Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My fix on my bike took longer than I had hoped so it looks like I won't be able to drive it back from NY to Pittsburgh before the snow comes (it snowed a little today) but that leaves me with a problem.

My bike is at my dads at the moment yet I can't keep it in his garage for lack of space. He has a shed in the back that he offered but I was wondering if that is a safe place to store a motorcycle for the winter.

I mean, after i winterize it (remove battery, treat gas etc) is there any harm in keeping it in unheated shed that is home to bugs and spiders and possibly some mice?

I don't want to open the doors when I come back in spring and find the rubber chewed through and a nest of rats living in the burrowed out den that used to be my seat.

Am i just being paranoid or does anyone strongly advise against the back shed idea?
 

·
..have a vulcan good day!
Joined
·
4,508 Posts
My fix on my bike took longer than I had hoped so it looks like I won't be able to drive it back from NY to Pittsburgh before the snow comes (it snowed a little today) but that leaves me with a problem.

My bike is at my dads at the moment yet I can't keep it in his garage for lack of space. He has a shed in the back that he offered but I was wondering if that is a safe place to store a motorcycle for the winter.

I mean, after i winterize it (remove battery, treat gas etc) is there any harm in keeping it in unheated shed that is home to bugs and spiders and possibly some mice?

I don't want to open the doors when I come back in spring and find the rubber chewed through and a nest of rats living in the burrowed out den that used to be my seat.

Am i just being paranoid or does anyone strongly advise against the back shed idea?
Smart precautions are ideal.
There are many procedures/methods/idea's of best method to store your bike.
many should chime in with idea's/thoughts....all will be good.
keeping it short here
:smiley_th
 

·
Sparky!!!
Joined
·
8,697 Posts
The fallowing is taken directly off of the Yahoo Vn750 Group page.

What "storage" means to you may determine what you do or don't do to prepare the motorcycle.

Weather you live in Minnesota or Missouri or Mississippi, each area of the country will require different procedures. Indoors or outdoors, and 2 months or 6 months each have their own requirements.
........................................................................

These Storage procedures are from the 1992 Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Owner's Manual (page 115).

Preparation for storage:
------------------------
* Clean the entire vehicle thoroughly.

* Empty the fuel from the fuel tank, and empty the carburetors by unscrewing the drain screw at each float bowl. (If left in for a long time, the fuel will break down and could clog the carburetors.)

* Remove the empty fuel tank, pour about 250ml (1/2 pint) of motor oil into the tank, roll the tank around to coat the inner surfaces thoroughly, and pour out the excess oil.

WARNING
Gasoline is extremely flammable and can be explosive under certain conditions. Turn the ignition switch OFF. Do not smoke. Make sure the area is well ventilated and free from any source of flame or sparks; this includes any appliance with a pilot light.

* Remove the spark plugs and pour several drops of SE class SAE 30 oil into each cylinder. Push the starter button for a few seconds to coat the cylinder walls with oil, and install the spark plugs.

* Reduce tire pressure by about 20%.

* Set the motorcycle on a box or stand so that both wheels are raised off the ground (if this cannot be done, put boards under the front and rear wheels to keep dampness away from the tire rubber.)

* Spray oil on all unpainted metal surfaces to prevent rusting. Avoid getting oil on rubber parts or in the brakes.

* Lubricate all the cables.

* Remove the battery, and store it where it will not be exposed to direct sunlight, moisture, or freezing temperatures. During storage it should be given a slow charge (one ampere or less) about once a month. Keep the battery well charged during cold weather so that the electrolyte does not freeze and crack open the battery. The more discharged the battery becomes, the more easily it freezes.

* Tie plastic bags over the exhaust pipes to prevent moisture from entering.

* Put a cover over the motorcycle to keep dust and dirt from collecting on it.

Preparation after storage
-------------------------
* Check the electrolyte level in the battery, charge the battery if necessary, and install it in the motorcycle. Be careful that the battery vent hose is not pinched and that it is kept away from the driving system and other frame parts.

* Make sure the spark plugs are tight.

* Fill the fuel tank with fuel.

* Change the engine oil.

* Check all the points listed in the "Daily Safety Checks" section. (page 50)
 

·
..have a vulcan good day!
Joined
·
4,508 Posts
The fallowing is taken directly off of the Yahoo Vn750 Group page.
Seems, to me, like decent Key advice !
? ?

many will put simpler & more detailed in their own words.....

:smiley_th
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,353 Posts
I store mine in an unheated shed, but i know that mice can't get to it.
I can tell you that other than treating the fuel system and putting the battery on a tender, I don't forsee any issues for winter storage. Been doing this for years and never had a problem.

In your case you may want to do some other things in addition to what was posted above,

If you are worried about mice chewing or nesting, tape or seal up any openings that they might find welcoming....like the air inlet on the back of the air filter pods and the exhaust tips. Cover the bike and place a few moth balls around and on the bike to keep the varmints away.
Peppermint is something that mice detest. Place some peppermint leaves or rags soaked with peppermint oil around the bike and on the engine or other places you want to keep them away from.

Hope this helps!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
Not sure about the battery. New ones can withstand the cold better then the oldies. And a little leery about bringing one inside and charging it. JMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,248 Posts
* Tie plastic bags over the exhaust pipes to prevent moisture from entering.
Don't think I would try to cap the pipes, you'll trap more moisture than you'll keep out. With temperature swings, moisture will form on metal no matter what. You need air circulation to dry things out.

Not sure about the battery. New ones can withstand the cold better then the oldies. And a little leery about bringing one inside and charging it.
An AGM type battery shouldn't out-gas like a wet cell does, so indoor storage/charging shouldn't be a problem with that type of battery.

* Reduce tire pressure by about 20%.
Huh?? A sure way to get flat spots if you can't get the tires off the floor. But why anyway?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Seems, to me, like decent Key advice !
? ?

many will put simpler & more detailed in their own words.....

:smiley_th
ee

I disagree with emptying the fuel tank and especially the carbs. Gaskets have a tendency to dry up and create leaks when refilled in the spring. I put in a full tank of gas with Stabyl added, (or Seafoam if you choose) and run the engine long enough to get gas treatment down into the carbs. I have been doing this with zero adverse effects and zero rust in the tank for many decades now. Just make sure after running the engine that the tank is filled up to the top after running the engine. And BTW, I have always stored my bike in an unheated shed every winter.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,958 Posts
Agree no reason to empty tank.(unless you're going to store it for a whole year)
Draining the carbs should be fine.
Do fill the tank with non-Ethonal gas if you can and use SeaFoam. A few have suggested putting some two stroke oil in the gas and running the bike until it starts burning it.

As for mice and bugs, covering the exhaust ends is fine. Spock is correct, you'll get moisteue in there either way, so doesn't matter if you "trap" it in there...(that two stroke oil should keep the rust out right?)
Plug up the air intakes on the ears, for some reason this is always a favorite hiding place for mice. Cover the bike with a large cotton sheet, not plastic.
Put a open can of mothballs under the bike, don't put any on the bike as they can react with some paint and plastics.

Agree taking the battery out and bringing it inside. I'd suggest not leaving it on a charger 24/7 but just hooking it up to charge it every month.

The number one issue with long time storage with these bikes is fuel drying up in the carbs and clogging the pilot jet. So it's up to you what method you use to deal with this. I believe draining the carbs and running some straight SeaFoam or carb cleaner through them is as good as any of the others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,248 Posts
covering the exhaust ends is fine. Spock is correct, you'll get moisteue in there either way, so doesn't matter if you "trap" it in there...(that two stroke oil should keep the rust out right?)
It does matter if you keep moisture in the pipes. You need air circulation to dry them out in between temperature swings.
Don't think mice can get past the baffle plate on stock pipes.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,958 Posts
If the bikes covered inside a shed, how much air is going to be circulating? And how is the moisture going to be a problem at below freezing tempatures?

Only seen rust in exhausts that have bed left outside to sun and rain, but have seen photos of mice in mufflers.

Guess if you're concerned about moisture , cover the ends with metal screen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,248 Posts
If the bikes covered inside a shed, how much air is going to be circulating?
All of it. Not talking about wind here.

And how is the moisture going to be a problem at below freezing tempatures?
Don't know about where you are, but in winters here, temp swings from 20° to 60° are not uncommon, and that's when condensation forms in garages and sheds. Last week, a high of 72° and a low of 28° in 24 hours. Not even winter yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Storage

One other advantage to keeping the tank full with treated petrol is when some good weather arrives I take advantage of it and just refill the tank with more treated petrol when done cruising!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Lot of great advice here fellas and I appreciate it.

For length of time, once I get the mod piece in I'm going to replace the stator and drive it around some since I'm up there for Thanksgiving and whatnot. So basically from December 1st until its safe enough to ride again (no snow), hopefully March.

So I'm lookin at three months.

The shed has no electricity capability and as such I wouldn't be able to put a float charger on it. I'm leery about leaving it out there for three months uncharged.

I think some seafoam like additive for a couple of months should be able to keep the gas good from what I hear.

Thanks for the great advice on stopping the mice from making a home inside my bike...good ideas.

And i'm not saying that there's a pied piper epidemic, but mice, squirrels, chipmunks whatever might be out there, i don't know. Just want to be cautious.

So what i've gathered is that some seafoam in the tank, cover openings that may invite nesting, cover the bike in my bike cover and take the battery out for the occasional charge and I should be good to go.

Thanks again for all your help, much appreciated. Now just have to get the darn thing to keep a charge :dead_hors
 

·
1986 VN750
Joined
·
3,255 Posts
The shed has no electricity capability and as such I wouldn't be able to put a float charger on it. I'm leery about leaving it out there for three months uncharged.
Pull the battery and leave it charging elsewere maybe? I keep a share on charge 90% of the time in my garage. I just keep it out of the way of anything so its not accidentally bumped/etc.

That being said I did leave an AGM for 3 months and it didn't do any harm after a re-charge. I, nor anyone else really I'm sure, suggests doing that though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
That'st the plan tanner. Just pull it and leave it on a float charger, have my dad check on it from time to time when I'm not around.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,027 Posts
Here we have summer storage. I got up early this morning and went for a 200+ mile ride. I came back home around 12:00, because it was getting a little warm. Not seriously hot, but uncomfortably warm.

One thing I know for sure, after just doing a complete carb clean. If I'm going to let it sit for more than a few days, the carbs get drained and filled with WD-40.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,248 Posts
Temps shot up to the low 60s here yesterday. Went out and pulled the cover off to go for a ride, and the whole bike was covered in condensation, even the plastic side covers.

Warmer today but way too wet.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top