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Had a great ride yesterday with temperatures uncommonly high for this time of year (69 degrees). Rode up to Xenia, OH to see my brother in law whose son is due to return for awhile from Afghanistan (Army-Fort Campbell). Anyway, had a great ride through some back roads, covered bridges, John Bryan State Park and Young's Jersey dairy. Anyway, I got home and cleaned the bike all up, changed the oil, filled the tank, and added some stabil. Well I just read this Winter Storage info in the Vulcan Verses,

"26.10.3. Change the oil & filter, check air filter, brake fluid. Run some Stabil or Seafoam in the gas till you can smell it a bit in the exhaust. This will help to reduce "varnish" in the carb and fuel lines. Fill tank to top.
Start engine and turn off gas and let the carb run out to empty. This will lessen chance of varnish in the bowl."

Not sure how to turn the gas off on my 86 VN750? It can't be "ON" or "RES" so is it the "PRI" setting? I've used that when the bike sits for awhile to prime the gas in order to make it easier to start. Help! Thanks!
 

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"Run some Stabil or Seafoam in the gas till you can smell it a bit in the exhaust. This will help to reduce "varnish" in the carb and fuel lines. Fill tank to top.
Start engine and turn off gas and let the carb run out to empty. This will lessen chance of varnish in the bowl."

I disagree with the above post. The small amount of fuel stabilizer in the residual fuel left in the carb after you try to run it to empty, isn't going to prevent varnish. Both will evaporate, leaving varnish in the carb. You are better off to just park it with the carb full. I had a bike with Sea Foam in it that sat for a year and cranked just fine. The gas was good and the carb wasn't gummed up.

To answer your question, there is no way to turn your petcock off. You would have to disconnect the fuel line below the petcock and capture the fuel until the carb ran empty.
 

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Thanks! That's what I was trying to figure out. I always run seafoam in the tank and add stabil as well over the winter months. Just paranoid. It's full and that's how she'll sit until better weather!
 

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"Run some Stabil or Seafoam in the gas till you can smell it a bit in the exhaust. This will help to reduce "varnish" in the carb and fuel lines. Fill tank to top.
Start engine and turn off gas and let the carb run out to empty. This will lessen chance of varnish in the bowl."

I disagree with the above post. The small amount of fuel stabilizer in the residual fuel left in the carb after you try to run it to empty, isn't going to prevent varnish. Both will evaporate, leaving varnish in the carb. You are better off to just park it with the carb full. I had a bike with Sea Foam in it that sat for a year and cranked just fine. The gas was good and the carb wasn't gummed up.

To answer your question, there is no way to turn your petcock off. You would have to disconnect the fuel line below the petcock and capture the fuel until the carb ran empty.
YEA---Finally someone that I agree with... I think it is best to leave the carbs full, as well as the gas tank... I remember years ago when I fished a lot and would just kill the outboard engine and store, someone said I was doing wrong and that I should run the carbs dry, so I did and the next spring it took 2 acts of congress to get it started, and about another month to get it running right...
Had no problems before or after by leaving the carbs full...
Other than that I aslo think that if you can, a start and run a bit every 2-3 weeks will also do wonders for the storage part...
Just make sure your battery stays up to par, as a discharged battery will freeze...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Not that I'm biased in any way, but I would only use seafoam for the procedure. I've had bad experiences in the past with stabil, and it is mostly from the high humidity we have during the winter here as it typically doesn't get that cold for any length of time, but does go through large swings in temperature and humidity which, IMO causes issues with fuel systems on machinery stored in garages, sheds and such. I had the "act of congress" procedure on any lawnmower, weed eater, chain saw and such trying to get them started in the spring every year using stabil until I finally heard of seafoam and tried it the first winter. I've never had a problem since 2002 getting any of those machines running in the spring...

And I also vote for leaving the tank full and not draining the carbs. I ride throughout the winter, so I don't know about just starting and running it periodically, but I would think it would be better to actually ride it for 30 minutes here and there as apposed to just starting it and warming it up, but I understand that might be impossible.
 

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X3 flite.

Another thing about leaving carbs empty, some things can dry out. crack, and go bad if left empty for long periods of time. I have never emptied my carbs on my bikes, snowmobiles, or any other gas engine for that matter and have no problems with start up in the spring. I drain the gas mixed with K100 or seafoam that was in it over the winter and put in fresh. The gas I drain out just goes in my truck so its doesn't go to waste. Plus my truck always needs gas anyways. lol
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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I ride throughout the winter, so I don't know about just starting and running it periodically, but I would think it would be better to actually ride it for 30 minutes here and there as apposed to just starting it and warming it up, but I understand that might be impossible.
Oh I agree, absolutly ride if you can, 30 minutes would be very good, and more is better...lol...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Other than that I aslo think that if you can, a start and run a bit every 2-3 weeks will also do wonders for the storage part...
I've read (no personal experience) that just starting it up for a few minutes can actually be worse. It puts more acids into the oil from running it, but you're not actually getting it up to temp where it can burn off the condensation and stuff. It's essentially the worst part of running an engine, without any of the good parts.
 

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Oh I agree, absolutly ride if you can, 30 minutes would be very good, and more is better...lol...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
I've read (no personal experience) that just starting it up for a few minutes can actually be worse. It puts more acids into the oil from running it, but you're not actually getting it up to temp where it can burn off the condensation and stuff. It's essentially the worst part of running an engine, without any of the good parts.
X3 Starting and riding until the engine is hot enough for long enough to evaporate any condensation in the oil would be the best option. Just starting the engine and letting it idle will not warm the oil up enough to drive off the water in the oil, especially in cold weather. The water will combine with other combustion byproducts to form sulfuric acid (and maybe other acids too) in the oil, which attacks anything it comes in contact with.

Starting the bike every few weeks will keep fresh *seafoamed* gas in the carb bowls and may prevent gum or varnish from forming, but for the reasons mentioned above, it is not my first choice for winter storage. For maximum protection I would put in fresh oil and a new filter, a full tank of gas treated with 4-6 oz of Seafoam, ride it for 20-30 minutes to get everything warmed up and well circulated, then park it and leave it sit until ready to ride again.

Make sure the battery is charged up and keep it in a cool but not extremely cold place, or keep it on a tender.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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I've read (no personal experience) that just starting it up for a few minutes can actually be worse. It puts more acids into the oil from running it, but you're not actually getting it up to temp where it can burn off the condensation and stuff. It's essentially the worst part of running an engine, without any of the good parts.
I think that is true, also water vapors can form etc. too, so I think you should at least run long enough to get up to temp. ...
I mean, you would need to run a bit anyway to offset the battery discharge from starting, and also put a bit extra back in...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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I fog my engines in the winter, so starting them periodically is out of the question. I bought battery tenders, and will keep them on the bikes for the duration. But, I'm not done riding mine yet. Maybe Thanksgiving week I'll put it away, but I haven't decided yet. My wife's bike is put away for the winter. She won't ride if it gets below 50 degrees.
 

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I fog my engines in the winter
Interesting, I have never heard of this before; I had to "Google" it.

A couple questions:
What brand fogging treatment do you use?
Where do you spray it in your VN750 carb?
Do you spray it right before turning the engine off?

Compared with Seafoam, it seems more directly aimed at preventing corrosion and damage from a dry start after prolonged storage. I don't see why you couldn't still add a heavy dose of Seafoam to your gas while using a fogging treatment.
 

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Interesting, I have never heard of this before; I had to "Google" it.

A couple questions:
What brand fogging treatment do you use?
I purchased a can of marine fogging stuff. I can't tell you the brand right now, because it's at home, and I work 250 miles away from home all week. I don't even remember if I bought it at an auto parts store or Wally World.

Where do you spray it in your VN750 carb?
I don't have the VN750 anymore, but you do the same for any engine. You remove a spark plug from each cylinder, and spray a direct stream into the hole for about 10 seconds. Then replace the plugs. Take off all plug wires and crank the engine over a few times so the stuff gets into the cylinders good.

Do you spray it right before turning the engine off?
See the previous response.

Compared with Seafoam, it seems more directly aimed at preventing corrosion and damage from a dry start after prolonged storage. I don't see why you couldn't still add a heavy dose of Seafoam to your gas while using a fogging treatment.
I never said anything against using Seafoam. You want something in the gas to stabilize it. I store my bikes with the tanks full. I've been using Stabil, the marine version. I'm told it holds the gas better than the regular stuff. Reading the label on Seafoam, though, says it will do the same thing.

All I can say is I never have any trouble starting the bikes again in the Spring.
 

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For the seafoam lovers they also offer Seafoam fogger. I Use it in my snowmobiles when putting them up for the summer.

Another thing I do for winter storage is adding Marvels mystery oil or seafoam to the engine oil. It helps with condensation over the winter months and in the spring I don't see the milky color in the oil. I also leave the used oil in but before riding in the spring I start out with a fresh oil change, final drive oil change and so on.
 

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Dave
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Well, here's my dilemma.

I store my bike in the basement in the winter. Its dry and comfy down there.

BUT, I don't want gas in it since I also have a woodstove down there I use in the winter to put some heat up through the floor to the living space. My workshop is down there too. My luck something would start to leak......

I have always drained the gas and bowls with all my other bikes and after a 4-5 month stay down there, refilled, and restarted with no problems. The VN750 owners manual also says to do this along with other things.

Is there something about our Vulcans that will be different than my other bikes? Yeah I know about seals and gaskets drying out but I haven't experienced that.........yet.........

Thanks for your inputs.
Dave
 

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Well if what you have been doing works for you by all means keep doing it. What works for some may not work for others. I think climate has a big role in how things deteriorate over time. I store mine in an unheated shed so there is no threat like you have in your basement. One thing you could do is fog your bike after draining the fuel which can help in the long run.
 

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I would think what you have been doing is fine, given the conditions in your basement. Running some Sea Foam in the first tank of gas should remove any varnish that may develop in the tank and carb.
 

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Dave
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Thanks gang,

Since I just got my Vulcan this past June just wanted to find out if there was anyone who had done this and not had good results on this particular bike.

I have been running a little Seafoam in the last couple of tanks and will do again in spring.

I'll give it a whirl and if I have any problems next spring I will post here.

dave
 

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I think I would just pull the fuel lines and pour straight Seafoam into the carbs. (after draining the float bowls)

I would then plug the vent tubes and lines off the carb, cover the ends of the exhaust pipes with plastic bags held on with rubber bands, block up the rear a bit so both tires are off the floor and cover the bike with a clean cotton sheet. A dish of mothballs under the bike to ward off any crawling things from making a home there is good idea ...I have spiders in my basement...

If kept inside the basement, I would fill then pull the gas tank and store it in the garage...(rather than draining it)

Another old storage tip is to mix up some gas and two stroke oil and fill up with that instead. Run the bike untill the smoke begins to kill the neighbors cat and just shut the bike down. The theory was that the oil would "fog " the cylnders, lube the inside of tank and carb preventing rust, and keep the carbs from developing varnish because oil does not evaporate like gas does.

Come spring, drain the tank, fill up with fresh gas and she's ready to go after a few minutes of smokin out the 2 stroke oil.


But luckily I don't have to do all that because I still ride durring the winter here.
 

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To run the carbs dry just disconnect and plug (on the carb side) the vacuum line to the petcock and that will shut off the fuel supply. I'd either run seafoam through it for a bit before putting it away or like Knife said drain and fill the carbs with it.
 
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