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Discussion Starter #1
I am almost done with a complete rebuild on my motor. I just have to get the pesky carb in. I just want to know if I will ever get to stop working on my bike and just ride it? It seems like so many people are continually working on their bikes. Is this just part of owning a motor bike? Or is is just these bikes. I owned a 1975 Yamaha DT 400 enduro before this bike and I only ever did routine maintenance on it and and it started on the first kick almost every time. Sometime I regret selling that thing. I just hope I can finally enjoy my bike without turning a wrench for a while. Someone please offer me some hope. I will admit I couldn't have done it without all of you. Thanks to each of you.
 

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Once you get her going, it may take a few tweaks here and there, but then she should be good to go. Of course, that means doing a pre-ride check as a habit and giving the bike a once-over regularly (checking all wiring connections, making sure there's no corrosion starting up anywhere, checking hoses, etc., etc., etc.). A lot of folks end up on this site because they've purchased a bike that has "issues"- so the threads here aren't necessarily representative of how this little gem of a motorcycle actually performs. :)
 

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CWO3 Navy (Retired)
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722 Posts
Ditto what she said! These bikes are the Checker Marathon of motorcycles! Mine sat for 10 years and after doing the carbs and brakes, I was on the road and put over 3,200 miles on it with only an oil change and tires. The other work I did was because I wanted to not because I had to. So have faith, get the bike running and it will give you great service.
 

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Newb with a Bullet!
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589 Posts
That's good to hear because I'm starting to feel the same way about my ride! I keep hoping, however! And I'm learning a lot along the way and have found I enjoy "wrenching" as much as "riding". Although too much of prior and not enough of the latter is an undesirable ratio!
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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Hang in there, Fellow Vulcaneer....:rockon:...!!!

It's usually darkest right b4 the dawn, as they say.

If your bike is one that has been thru at least 2-3 different owners, and has sat for a while, unloved and/or unused, it can easily develop problems...and subsequent owners end up paying the price for this neglect.

After you take the advice already given above, to save yourself even more headaches, later...be sure to:

a) Inspect the rear driveshaft splines, for proper lubrication. If they are dry, or underlubed, they can obviously wear off....leaving you on foot, and heaven only knows where...:(...! Many threads here explain/discuss how to fix this (if you haven't already).

b) Relocated your bike's regulator/rectifier ("r/r" in most threads). This "upgrade" will help extend its service life.

c) If you haven't already, install a maintenance-free, AGM battery on your bike. Besides better starting performance, a sealed battery doesn't have to have fluids checked (read: seat removed) or added at least twice a month.

d) Especially if your bike is an older one, or one that has sat out in the elements, clean your bikes main electrical connectors (e.g., at the regulator/rectifier) with a good electronic contact cleaner that's also labelled as safe for plastics! Then pack said connectors (and keep them packed) with dielectric grease.

e) For much better peace of mind, especially while on longer rides, install "Ride On" tire sealant in your bike's tires (unless they are near their replacement). This sealant does an amazing job of keeping a tire sealed and from going flat, due to things like a nail or drywall screw puncture. As a backup, keep a tire repair kit on board your bike (and know how to use this kit, b4 you need it!).

f) Install a voltmeter (preferably one that's designed for motorcycle duty) to monitor your bike's charging system. This can later save you from being on foot--without warning....:mad:

g) Do a thread search for the "phantom gas syndrome"...and know what causes this.....and how to handle it.

h) Especially if you store your bike exposed to the elements at all, be sure to get a good cover for it--and use the cover, religiously. Your baby is a great machine--but she will rust, if not covered and polished properly. Of course, a rusty bike is an ugly bike. REAAA-LY ugly.


Much of the above is good practice in general, and not just on our bike. Your initial investment with this above "check list" will save you a lot of hassle and frustration later on, and keep you riding instead of unexpectedly wrenching. Again--many threads exist on this forum for most of the above--so you can be educated on the subject, if you're not already.

After you get the "kinks" out of your VN750, you will find that it is a fun machine, with quite a lot of info, support and camraderie from this forum as a huuuuuuuuuuge bonus! It is the last bike of its kind--and thus is truly unique (not a Harley wanna-be) in the motorcycling world. Ride your VN750 with pride.....:rockon:
 

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Premium Member
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812 Posts
Chainsaw, welcome to this wonderful group.

I bought mine in 2006, she was 3 years old. An acquaintance bought her new in 2003 and rode for a year then moved on to 2 Harleys. For 2 years prior to me she sat in a garage without use. Beside a minor problem in the rear hub stemming from a bad gasket or use of the wrong gear lube there have been no problems at all. Now I have never owned a vehicle, car or bike that I haven't tinkered with. As you can see in the signature I have added and changed the things that I like but otherwise this is a great machine. If you're doing the rebuild correctly and follow good mechanical practice with this bike, opening your toolbox is going to be your option.

This is a good high performance machine, ride safely and enjoy.

Gemguy :beerchug:
 

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You don't want to labeled a poser do you?

;-)

DT
 

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Straight roads are evil
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580 Posts
Motorcycles need more maintenance than cars, it's a fact of life. If you keep the bike maintained, it'll run long and hard. I've got about 42K in just three years on the bike (original owner).

Would post more but it's time to go ride a few hundred more miles of twisty roads. Gear up, let's ride!
 

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Premium Member
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2,850 Posts
I am almost done with a complete rebuild on my motor. I just have to get the pesky carb in. I just want to know if I will ever get to stop working on my bike and just ride it? It seems like so many people are continually working on their bikes. Is this just part of owning a motor bike? Or is is just these bikes. I owned a 1975 Yamaha DT 400 enduro before this bike and I only ever did routine maintenance on it and and it started on the first kick almost every time. Sometime I regret selling that thing. I just hope I can finally enjoy my bike without turning a wrench for a while. Someone please offer me some hope. I will admit I couldn't have done it without all of you. Thanks to each of you.
I felt the same way a few months after buying my bike too, but like has been mentioned, years of neglect and/or questionable repair skills by PO's takes a toll. My first few months of ownership I worked on it alot more than I ride it, and now this spring and summer I've ridden it a whole lot more than wrenched on it.

You can get to the point where you'll only do normal maintenance or the occasional fix, and once these bikes are sorted out, they're pretty nice to be out riding around on. :smiley_th
 

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I've had mine for about 2 years and can tell the PO did a good job maintaining it. Its a 93 with 16k on the clock and needed nothing but usual maintenance. I ride to work most days which is 70 miles round trip and usually put about 200 on her on the weekends. When properly maintained, rebuilt or not, these things run their asses off...
 

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Premium Member
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Hey Chainsaw! Welcome to the group! As far as working on the bike, it's all relative to how you bought it. My 02 I bought with 9300 miles on her and the splines were dry and shot. Usually this problem shows up in the 2000-2006 models but it has been here and there on older bikes. Cost me $100 plus shipping to get a used final drive and drive shaft off ebay. I did the spline lube procedure pictorial in my sig as I did the repair. Everything else I've done has been routine stuff, and some mods that are recommended here. The spline lube is actually an easy job to do so as much as everyone makes it out to be a pain, it is maybe on the first run through, but once you've done it, it's not anything to be afraid of in the future.

My previous bike was a KZ1000P that had 60K of hard living on it already, retired from the Ft. Worth PD in 2003, and needed plenty of TLC to get it dependable and looking good. But, I knew that going in and only paid $1100 for it. Once you have the bike running good and all the all the maintenance that it's been needing already done, you will have a great running and dependable bike and can concentrate on riding and periodic maintenance when it is due. Hang in there. You'll love the bike in due time! :beerchug:
 
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