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Premium Member
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3,505 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Okay, Liquid Wrench isn't quite as good as I thought. I was pulling the air intake things off of Orleans so that I could marble the bike, and broke off a bolt (second one on this bike). Aside from learning that I should use a Dremel to get the remainder of the bolt out of the cylinder, I came across a series of posts about PB Blaster for loosening up stubborn nuts and bolts. Can anyone tell me where I can get this second-miracle-after-Seafoam stuff?

Also, to avoid breaking bolts in the future...I've always applied some kind of lube like a lithium grease to threads before screwing 'em in, but some of the posts I read talked about the anti-seize that's usually used for the spark plugs. Are there areas on the bike where anti-seize is preferred over pleb Li grease?

Onward....
 

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brand new old guy
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39 Posts
Too grease or not to grease

I use li grease on frame bolts, and anti sieze on bolts that are in contact, with the exhaust manifolds to include the spark plugs, all other bolts I leave au natural. the mounting bolts I lather with grease execpt the threads, which I use blue thread locker. All screws in contact with plastic I use a dab of grease on, and those few that touch chrome I use thread locker. I hope this helps you out, as for pb blaster, I use it only when I feel a bolts too rusted or I know it's torqued down and never been loosened like the head bolts. Be careful using a dremel on alluminum, if you mess up it's going to be expensive.

:motorcycl
 

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Premium Member
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1,766 Posts
Cindy -

You can get PB Blaster at any of the automotive stores (Advance Auto, Autozone, NAPA, etc.).

Didn't do anything for me getting that bolt of the the exhaust manifold. Just broke two easy outs off in it. Got a used manifold to cure the problem.

Anti-seize is generally used where you have dissimilar metals involved. Like steel spark plugs in aluminum heads. You can use light grade loctite, it will hold and prevent threads from binding.

Jon
 

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Uber Member
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1,280 Posts
every time i do any auto mantinance, the night before i look over what all i will be doing, and make a quick plan on my steps. I then look for trouble bolts nuts and fittings. Then i take the appropriate steps to speed the process. I then spray all the rusted bolts with seafoam's deep creep. I also make note of any special tools needed. This takes 15-45 mins. Saves about an hour or more depending on type of work done. Then if i still have trouble i follow up with some more deep creep. Havent had a bolt break on me yet, except one time i had some 3mm rusted bolts break. ::knocks on wood::
 

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HAWK
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2,576 Posts
I go to my parts department at my dealership where I work:smiley_th
They do sell it at most autoparts stores and it works great
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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6,141 Posts
One thing that sometimes helps, but could end up being just as bad as busting a bolt when trying to remove it, is to try to give it a turn in if it seems tough to turn out. Occasionally they will move forward just enough to make them come out easier.
Not that I suggest anyone try this, but just mentioning it.
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #8
Seafoam makes another product? Cool - I'm enamored of the stuff I'm dumping in my engine, so I'll gladly try another product. [Tangential Question: if I dump Seafoam Usual in the carbs, where am I putting it in?]


Thanks, too, for the "dissimilar metals" heads-up - that makes sense. Hard to tell what kinda bolts are coming off Orleans - just that several have come off in pieces. Hyper, I'll give the CW turn a go on the front cylinder air intake bolts - nuthin' left on the rear cylinder 'cept a little bitty piece that's below flush with the opening. Grrrrr...gotta yank that out whether I marble, coaster, or just hook up the hoses as usual.

I think we need a "Zen smiley". Just to remind us (well, me) that it's all about the process!
 

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Registered
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299 Posts
A lot of the time heat works well to get out rusty bolts..Or you could drill a smaller hole in the center of the bolt and use a bolt extracter.As far as putting anti sieze on the bolts I highly recomend it.Anti sieze can be used on any bolt that has threads.I use it whenever I remove a bolt or nut Never ever had a problem.I work on small engines and I use all the time.I also repair appliances washers dryers etc.I use it there to.I will use lock tite when I dont want a bolt or nut to loosen up.
 

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Uber Member
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1,280 Posts
A lot of the time heat works well to get out rusty bolts..Or you could drill a smaller hole in the center of the bolt and use a bolt extracter.As far as putting anti sieze on the bolts I highly recomend it.Anti sieze can be used on any bolt that has threads.I use it whenever I remove a bolt or nut Never ever had a problem.I work on small engines and I use all the time.I also repair appliances washers dryers etc.I use it there to.I will use lock tite when I dont want a bolt or nut to loosen up.
I've heard that too, just make sure you use the chemical method separate from the heat method. Fires do not help the bolts out, but are very good for ensuring trips to the ER!
 
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