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Hi All,

Just wondering what tools are recommended to carry on the bike. My bike didn't come with the stock vn750 tool kit.

I thought about just duplicating what came in the stock kit. Or I found a nice one by CruzTools with a nice case - of course it's pricey.

Just curious what others on here carry with them when out riding.
 

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Cell phone and a credit card......



I do actually have tools that I keep on my bike. A socket set, set of the needed Allen wrenches, a roll of electrical tape and a couple of screwdrivers. I think I do have a spark plug socket, and ......a tire plug kit. Been awhile since I looked, but I think that's it.


KM
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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If your bike's stator starts to fail (which you can see happening with the trusty voltmeter you've installed on your bike, right?....:)), you can buy yourself some time to get to the nearest shop/dealer (or back home) by removing the fuse that handles the headlight.

This is the very top right fuse in the fuse panel (which is behind the bike's left side cover). You'll need a pair of needle-nosed pliers (or equivalent) to make this removal quick and easy. Having a set of these pliers on board is not a bad idea.

This bike is reliable enough (assuming it was properly treated by any previous owners--ha!) so that what's most likely to put you on foot is either a battery issue or a flat tire.

It's a "no-brainer" that periodically inspecting the battery terminals to make sure their connections are clean and tight will save you a lot of problems later while on the road. Coating these terminals (and all other major electrical connections) after they've been cleaned with some dielectric grease will go a long way to keeping them clean over time.

If you install "Ride On" tire sealant in your tires, then your odds of having to stop to repair most flats goes way down. "Ride On" does its best job in tubeless tires, like ours. If you still have a flat with "Ride On" installed, it slows down the deflation process--another advantage of this sealant. So then your odds of a blowout are substantially reduced.

If you have not read any threads here on the "phantom gas syndrome", then you need to do a forum search for this, and read up on it. That's what's next most likely to give you real trouble while on the go. But I have found that it only occurs when (a) the fuel tank is below half full, and (b) the weather is really hot (July, August). Otherwise, the phantom gas syndrome should mostly leave you alone.

Thus, my main point here is that one of the other main things you should "carry" along is some really good tire sealant in your tires.

I've never understood why others feel a need to carry spare spark plugs. But I can recommend that you carry a spare headlight bulb (and the tools necessary to open the headlamp bucket to replace it)--especially if you haven't installed driving/aux lights on your bike.

If your bike is an older bike, carrying along a simple circuit tester to help find/troubleshoot wiring issues while on a longer ride might be a good idea, too. With this same train of thought, a few spare fuses (of different capacities like those already in the bike's fuse panel) in the tool kit might help out with an electrical issue, too.

I always carry a kickstand base plate with the bike, so if I am forced to park the bike on a soft surface (sand, or even hot asphalt) I can do so without the bike falling on its side after I walk away.

A spare bike key, carefully hidden, can save the day if you lose/misplace your bike's main key somehow.

Hope all this helps....:smiley_th
 

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Just make sure you have a socket that fits the bolts to get the seat off and give you access to your battery. I use the ignition key to turn the screw off the side cover so you could get to the fuse box, and I keep an extra pack of assorted fuses handy, also a flashlight.
 

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I carry a few tools in all my vehicles, but knowledge of the machine, car or bike is your most valuable tool.
Making sure your bike in good condition before riding is more valuable than carrying a lot of tools.

But another rider wrote that he carrys all the tools he uses to service his bike.
If he has to get an Allen wrench from his shop toolbox while working on his scoot, he puts it in the bikes toolkit and replaces the one in the shop.

I suggest you get comfortable working on your bike at home when it is warm, light, and you are not soaking wet or stressed or in a hurry to get someplace. You will then know what you are prepared to try and fix out on the road, and what tools to carry for self rescue.

Or do as KM suggested and carry a cell phone and credit card.

I have seen the toolkit list that Ron Major, an Ironbutt Rider carried, and it was truely comprehensive and impressive.
His toolkit was bigger than many here have in the garage or shop.

Link to Ironbutt site an 28 rules for long distance riding.
Find Ron`s tool list in #28.
http://www.ironbutt.com/tech/aowprintout.cfm

Another Ironbutt rider carried a spare piston for his Nomad.
I guess he changed one at a picnic table one time, a thousand miles from home.
Now he doesn`t take any chances!

Here is a link to CD and Bear`s check off list for camping on two bikes, a VN750 and an 800 Suzuki, I think.
http://www.cdthayer.com/cruiserlist.htm

Scroll down to find their respective toolkits.

Now I don`t think most us us have any need to carry all these tools on a daily basis.
I`m just giving you an idea of what some riders consider a neccesary toolkit. :)
 

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For local (within an hour of home or so), I just carry the stock tool kit, a couple replacement fuses, and my old Gerber multi-tool. I'm pretty well on top of PM, so I don't anticipate trouble on short rides, and a quick cell call has a trailer/more tools on the way.

On longer rides, or when riding in a bigger group, I carry quite a few more pieces. I'll throw in a good socket set and a variety of extensions, an extra spark plug socket (usually a couple different sizes), a regular and needle nose pliers, allen wrenches, a vise-grip, a couple sizes of adjustable wrench, a multi-bit screwdriver, a cheap multimeter (you don't want to bang around your good one), and a tire plug kit.

I also carry extra spark plugs and a quart of oil. Depending on the route, I might strap on a 1-gallon gas can, too. My wife does first-aid, so we pack her kit on long rides, too (maybe overkill, but if you mechanic like me, a few band-aids could come in handy ;) ).

Ride safe,
Hippie
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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You can simplify this a whole lot by just carrying a "redneck" tool kit.

Contents:

1 pair of vice grips
And
1 roll of duct tape

Will fix anything I am told.........
Not really, you actually need the 3 piece set to catch everything, add a hank of tie wire for the 3 piece set...lol...:beerchug:...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Not really, you actually need the 3 piece set to catch everything, add a hank of tie wire for the 3 piece set...lol...:beerchug:...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
I would have added that, but I thought most of the folks here couldn't afford the "Deluxe Set".......
 

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Stole my reply, lol...

Ya stole my reply, lol...

You can simplify this a whole lot by just carrying a "redneck" tool kit.

Contents:

1 pair of vice grips
And
1 roll of duct tape
But yup, baling wire, a MUST ! Ive held U-joints together with it for 50 mi. 2 pr vice grips btw...one reg one needlenose...

Lil more on the redneck end....and yes, I have very few teeth, and have run a still in the past.

1) pint of shine (for carb purposes)
2) large hammer (for when yer ticked off)
3) a chainsaw plug wrench (works on all but 1 plug) has a flat screwdriver too.
4) Space Blanket, so you can spend the night with yer scoot in the boonies since ya cant afford a cellphone or have plastic.
5) a new lighter....having fire is always a good thing....even dries fuel soaked plugs.
6) can of chiili, or ravioli, and quart of water (24oz Keystone Ice if you have saddlebags)

And Shark... I believe you dont need to remove the seat to jump or charge...exposing the starter relay has the positive lead right there, 5 inches from battery. So, a quarter is all ya'd need to open the cover.

But I keep a large, flat screwdriver onboard to "break a bead" if I need to...havent done it on a new fangled tubeless yet, but cant be much different...

On long trips used to have a can of fluorescent paint too, so I could spray "Hep me!" on sumpin if needed, lol.
 

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Plastic is always helpful, but it's good to have some cash with you, especially on longer rides. It can buy help from regular folks and might be useful if a business doesn't accept your card or if your bank/card company is having computer trouble.
 

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knees in the breeze!!!
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geezz !!! with all this stuff you guys carry whats your milage down to with all the weight?? and where do you put it?? i still cant figure out why everyone is obsessed with making these quick sporty bikes into saddle bag wearing, windshield sportin, cross country tourin gold wing wannabes ! if i want a bike to carry everything and the kitchen sink i wouldnt have bought this one lol its a bad azz roar down the road crusier not a pack mule
 

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5) a new lighter....having fire is always a good thing....even dries fuel soaked plugs.
You don't need a lighter. Gods honest truth.... Was out camping with my girlfriend right after I got my first bike...(a Suzuki TS 185) realized we had no matches or lighter to start a fire.

So, I pulled the fuel line to the carb, drained some gas on a rag, yanked the spark plug wire and spark plug (thanks to the OEM tool kit for the spark plug wrench) laid the plug against the cylinder fins with the rag , kicked the bike over (no electric start on this model) and presto.. I had fire.
(this is how the cavemen would have done it had they also had motorcycles)


I've done the same thing to light cigarettes, joints, and to start a fire on another camping trip.
 

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Got my latest new toy finished this weekend and hope I never have to use it in the case of a breakdown. I put eyelet bolts in usefull places for hauling multiple bikes. It was an old long heavy duty boat trailor that I started converting at the beginning of summer. Cut 7 feet off the front of it. Also designed it to haul my fiberglass bodied sand buggy. Pulls good. Got around $750 in it. What ya'll think.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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Hey, looks good from here... Just need the phone number that goes with it...lol... That cutting off the front reminded me of many years ago I had an old small boat trailer that I converted into a utility trailer... I cut a good bit off the tongue & front, I pulled it with an old military jeep, and when you backed up with it, when you saw the rear move the wrong way, it was too late...lol... That thing had some old V8 Ford hubcaps on Ford wire spoked wheels, and someone stole it I would bet for the wheels... The tires had S-2 on them, which I think means they were made during the rationing period of WWll...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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If only it had 6th gear..
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That thing is sweet man. Good job. Wish I still had my trailer. The v fits nicely in the back of my GMC but I liked loading bikes lower to the ground. My trailer had a short tongue too and was a b**** to back up straight when she wandered ha ha. Looks like your deck is quite a bit longer so I bet yours will handle better. Take care.
 

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geezz !!! with all this stuff you guys carry whats your milage down to with all the weight?? and where do you put it?? i still cant figure out why everyone is obsessed with making these quick sporty bikes into saddle bag wearing, windshield sportin, cross country tourin gold wing wannabes ! if i want a bike to carry everything and the kitchen sink i wouldnt have bought this one lol its a bad azz roar down the road crusier not a pack mule

I guess I missed the day you were elected the Supreme Ruler of motorcycles where YOU got the say how each bike was used by their owners.

I guess you forgot Kaw offered an entire touring package for the bike, or that some folks don't want an 859 lb Goldwing.

The 750 is "sporty" compared to some of the other cruiser styled bikes on the market, but compared to a true sport bike, it's like comparing an Escort to a Ferrari.
Your view of what this bike does , or should do..... Is just that... Your view. Don't make fun of others for theirs.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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/\ Be careful KM, Hank Jr. got the boot from the biased espn weird ones over his statement about Hitler & Netanyahu...lol...:doh:...
I love Hank Jr., he aint no spin Doctor...lol...:beerchug:...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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..have a vulcan good day!
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Nice ! A well done job !
 

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AAA card with motorcycle coverage.

Jon
 
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