Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I felt like my tires were low when i was riding home tonight, felt like it slid a little in a turn or two, so I decided to go pick up some stuff to check on my tires.

I went to my local autozone tonight and picked up a Slime brand digital gauge, and slime brand foot pump with gauge.

But.. neither actually work on the rear wheel. The digital gauge was too fat, and I couldn't get the foot pump nozzle on there because of the locking lever

Anyways, I was thinking of picking up this guy:
Progressive Air Shock Pump

its a 0-60 PSI pump, this would be sufficient to do both my tires and rear shocks right?

or should I get the 0-300 PSI one? I felt like the 0-60 would be more accurate? good idea?

Sorry for the stupid question, just really makes me nervous riding today, I was hoping to get it squared away so I could ride every day this week, its supposed to be nice weather....:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
I have several tire gauges; two digital and on pencil. Only the pencil model fits easily on the rear tire valve. However, I like the digitals better. So, I tilt the valve stem a few degrees (using my finger) to get the digital meters on. Same goes for my foot pump (standard Joe Blow model).

You could definitely use a shock pump if your just off a few pounds, but go with the 0-60psi model. However, the volume of air output by a shock pump is very small, compared to the foot pump. It will take a while to fill a full flat tire using a shock pump.

There are other meters and pumps that will fit, so you could also return the ones you just bought and shop around for a better fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I have several tire gauges; two digital and on pencil. Only the pencil model fits easily on the rear tire valve. However, I like the digitals better. So, I tilt the valve stem a few degrees (using my finger) to get the digital meters on. Same goes for my foot pump (standard Joe Blow model).

You could definitely use a shock pump if your just off a few pounds, but go with the 0-60psi model. However, the volume of air output by a shock pump is very small, compared to the foot pump. It will take a while to fill a full flat tire using a shock pump.

There are other meters and pumps that will fit, so you could also return the ones you just bought and shop around for a better fit.
Thanks, thats the game plan, not sure what im going to do, you're able to use one of the pumps with the long latches for the nozzle by pushing the stem to the side enough?

I also wasnt impressed with it since that pump read 40psi when i finally did get it on the rear stem, yet the pencil tester read like 32 psi.
 

·
and the Adventure Cycle
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
I wouldn't use a shock pump. Like cglennon said, it'll take awhile.
Check out something like THESE for getting the pump & guage onto the rear tire stem.
Just don't leave them on. Take them off once pressure is good.
For a permanent angled valve, ya could go with something like THESE.

Also, ya don't want to pull on the stem, as it could lead to it cracking. Not something ya want to happen when ya only have two wheels on the ground!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I wouldn't use a shock pump. Like cglennon said, it'll take awhile.
Check out something like THESE for getting the pump & guage onto the rear tire stem.
Just don't leave them on. Take them off once pressure is good.
For a permanent angled valve, ya could go with something like THESE.

Also, ya don't want to pull on the stem, as it could lead to it cracking. Not something ya want to happen when ya only have two wheels on the ground!
Brilliant!!! haha

Thanks for the suggestion, didn't even think of something like that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,735 Posts
How long are your stems? I got the shortest I could find at NAPA (3/4" ?) and don't have the above fitment issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I've no idea, whatever would come on the stock tires...

Ill have to try and get an angle extensions from an autozone or advance auto or something.

Would my issue of feeling like the rear end slips slightly be due to low tires? it doesnt seem like when I sit on the bike that the tire doesnt flatten out or buldge out much at all.
 

·
Love My Baby
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
I tried the extension angled valve stems and they are not worth the effort to put it on, fill up your tire and take it off, especially when you loose a lot of air taking the darn thing off. When I buy a new rear tire, I'm getting a stubby valve stem and that should take care of my air pump attachment issues.
 

·
and the Adventure Cycle
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
Would my issue of feeling like the rear end slips slightly be due to low tires? it doesnt seem like when I sit on the bike that the tire doesnt flatten out or buldge out much at all.
Are the tires old or newer? If they are old and dried out, it could cause the tire to not have good traction.
If they are newer, they could be low enough that you don't notice low pressure visually, but when riding, low enough to lose grip in a turn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Are the tires old or newer? If they are old and dried out, it could cause the tire to not have good traction.
If they are newer, they could be low enough that you don't notice low pressure visually, but when riding, low enough to lose grip in a turn.
I'm fairly certain they're the original stock tires. Looking last night for the PSI rating I noticed several little cracks in the sidewall, but didn't think to check the tire date. But on a bike that only had 5600 or so miles when I bought it, and at least one other new rider/owner, I doubt they have been changed. So I would say they're from 2000.

Its just funny because I didn't notice this before, maybe im pushing the bike a little harder than I was because i'm getting more comfortable on it. But im still a wuss so who knows.. lol

I think on one of the cheapo stick guages I got like 29-30 psi on the front, and 32-34 psi on the rear, but then when i put that foot pump on, the guage read 40 PSI, and I couldn't get the digital gauge on there to verify... didn't even bother with the front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Yeah, I figured... i was planning on riding on them for the season and replacement in the fall if I don't fall into a larger, better fitting bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I use one like this: http://www.matcotools.com/ProductImages/TG1031.jpg

The "head" has two positions you can push on the valve stem. I use the bottom one so that the barrel is folded back against the tire. It works much better that the typical plastic crap pencil gauges. Higher quality too and no problems fitting it on a standard "long" valve stem.

In my experience, the gauges on the foot/hand/manual pumps don't really reflect the pressure in the tire. So I always follow with the pressure gauge listed above.

Oh, and if you get new tires you should be aware of the "oversize tires" mod. It'll correct your speedo on the front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I use an angled tyre valve stem extender similar to the one suggested by Hyperbuzzin and I've never had any problems. Just put a tiny bit more air in than you need. It means I can check my tyres anywhere. Its the next best thing to short stems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Im going to see if I can find a set of them today so I can keep riding, Im also calling around/visiting a couple places to get quotes on the tire install and possibly have them lube the spline if I end up dropping the whole bike off.

The place I bought the bike from wants $35 per tire, if I buy the tires through them to take off. replace and remount the tires. $50 per if I buy the tires and bring them in... Wonder what they would want if I bring the wheels in to them... Guess I should call them back, haha.


I wonder if its just the cool weather making the tires not feel as full causing the slip, but it certainly scared me enough to back off the rest of the ride home.

~30ish PSI in the front and ~32ish PSI in the back isn't way off is it? I didn't think 2-3 PSI would make that big of a deal, then again, shame on me for not checking the tires more regularly...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
My local honda shop charges 37.50 per if you bring in the bike, half that for just the wheels. Your guys sound pretty expensive. If you pull the wheels, do the spline lube yourself and save money and gain experience. If you have them do it, you might want to print out the procedure and give it to them. Most of them won't know what you are talking about and you can't trust them to ask.
I also use one of the angled valve stem extensions and have never had a problem.
I agree that you shouldn't feel a problem with 30-32 lbs in them, but you felt something, which would make me slow down too! Yep, it is just too important to keep an eye on the pressure of your tires on a bike. Nuff said!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Ok so I came home and filled the tires up despite 5 stops I was unable to find an angled valve stem extension locally. Each place got more and more expensive to do the rear tires for me, the cheapest was the 1st place and im sure it will go down if i do it myself, which means its probably going to wait a while.

Both tires are around 35 psi or so. I used the pencil one then the digital one on the front to calibrate and used the pencil gauge on the rear.

I also noticed a coolant leak out of the screw on the bottom of the engine block on the right side near the exhaust... tightened her up, hopefully its fine... only a tiny little coolant drip out of there.

if it isn't one thing, its another...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
Im going to see if I can find a set of them today so I can keep riding, Im also calling around/visiting a couple places to get quotes on the tire install and possibly have them lube the spline if I end up dropping the whole bike off.

The place I bought the bike from wants $35 per tire, if I buy the tires through them to take off. replace and remount the tires. $50 per if I buy the tires and bring them in... Wonder what they would want if I bring the wheels in to them... Guess I should call them back, haha.


I wonder if its just the cool weather making the tires not feel as full causing the slip, but it certainly scared me enough to back off the rest of the ride home.

~30ish PSI in the front and ~32ish PSI in the back isn't way off is it? I didn't think 2-3 PSI would make that big of a deal, then again, shame on me for not checking the tires more regularly...
The 'slip' is probably due to the age of your tires, not the inflation (especially since you're inflation numbers are within specs).

Tires are full of volitile elements that dry out over time (about 5 years). Once that happens the tire become hard, they dry rot, crack and looses gripping qualities. Your tires are 9+ years old, almost twice there useful lifespan of about 5 years (average for a cruiser bike tire). And yes, cold weather will make the situation worse because the chemicals that kept the tire soft in cold weather are gone.

Baby just needs a new pair of shoes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I looked at it again, and realized I'm running Bridgestone Exedra's not the dunlops. unless Ive got mismatched tires, ill go check them again at lunch. Was there a time when the bridgstones were stocks or has it always been dunlops?

I still think they're old, the only code I could find on it was like T8999 or something of that nature.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top