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Discussion Starter #1
Ok started looking for a new stator, low and behold i have 5 options...

Electrosport ESG050- $119 +$15s/h
Electrex G05- $101.2 + unknown s/h
Electrex G105 (this is the high output "30% more")- 119+Unknown s/h
Oem- $250 depending where you shop
Rewind- about $100-150 to have it done, do it yourself for less then $50

I will be attempting a new mod that i will make myself that should negate almost all the engine heating issues...but still want the highest output.
 

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Read up on it. I think I remember reading something about a Honda stator that used two smaller wires instead of one big one. (More surface area for the electrons?) It gave a much higher output. If you are going to build your heat block in such a way that the stator can be removed without moving the engine, then this type of experimentation may be worth your while.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
well this is what i have figured out so far.... The mass of the cross section increases amps... meaning that if you were to cut the coil in half top to bottom, the more copper there the more amps you can push.

The more turns you get, the higher voltage you push.

so by running 2 smaller gauge wires in parallel it amounts up to moving up a gauge or 2. Question is, how many turns per pole? that is my only worry. i am sure there is some nasty formula. i may just take it it out and take the flywheel out and hook it up to a drill and mess around with the turns.
Idealy i want 12.8v at idle and 14.8 at 5.5k rpms. I think people are looking too much at voltage. yes voltage will drop as you apply load, but only if the amps arent high enough...

i think with the cooling that has been discussed earlier, a 20-40% gain in power should be a breeze with no longing effects. ::wonders if i should jump up a r/r unit to a more robust and higher wattage unit, or maybe even make my own lol::
 

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Yeah, if you are gonna change the stator output, then it would be wise to change the r/r. Correct me if I'm wrong, but $110+ for a OEM r/r? Seems like a bunch of diodes and a voltage regulator couldn't possibly be that much. Really, though, you should be able to get a regulator and rectifier already made that can handle the load without costing so darn much. Then you wouldn't be stuck with the default size and shape, so you could place it about anywhere. I bet if you cooled it you'd get a bit more current from it. You ever touched one, on the outside of the bike with air flowing over it? It's gotta be better than being over the belly - but i don't know. Take yours and lay it on the sidewalk at noon, and pick it up an hour later. It's that hot.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
oh yeah

well i think the stock r/r could handle a <20% boost. but if i go over that then yes i would need a more robust r/r. if i wanted to make my own i would make sure it would be able to handle a lot more. I prob could get the parts for less then $50. all i would need is a steel box, some thermal epoxy, 3 high watt/voltage diodes, and prob set up a twin phase voltage regulator too... that way the power is always clean and the voltage control would be shared between the too(redundancy to prevent a fry). then just throw a decent size capacitor in the loop. that will make everything just about bullet proof.
 

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I'm coming up with the same approx. value for an OEM r/r ($110 or so);and about 3x that for an OEM stator. Does anyone have suggestions for something that works but won't break the bank? I tried to pick up a NOS on eBay and apparently got outbid at the 11th hour (grrrr).

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
you must have been that robins person that was bidding on it.... I am going to attempt to rewind my own. If i can get it to work, i will post. I need a donor stator though, which i will post another thread for. hopefully i can boost output to the 400-500 mark with minimal drain at idle....
 

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Hey Hizzo, what is the current output of our current stator (assuming a correctly working r/r)? You said 500-550 watts, so it made me think, and I did 15amps X 70volts = 1050 watts, which means that a 15 amp fuse is probably too high for a fused stator. Needs to be more like 5 amps?
 

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<<you must have been that robins person that was bidding on it.... I am going to attempt to rewind my own. If i can get it to work, i will post. I need a donor stator though, which i will post another thread for. hopefully i can boost output to the 400-500 mark with minimal drain at idle....>>

Ha ha, yeah, that was me. Alas. I am bidding on an '86 stator as well, but I'm still not certain that my stator is out. I'll probably win that, given that I don't need it; so if you have trouble with the do-it-yourself approach, holler - I may have a stator for you.

Seriously, though, any other options for a regulator besides just sucking it up and making the purchase? Seems like the various sites I'm looking at either offer the OEM for $110+/-, or some version of their own for more.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
well seeing that i am still a college student in EE, i may not know a whole lot yet but this i do know. the parts to make up an r/r can be had for less then $50. when i boost the output of mine, i am looking at maybe even doing my own, but we'll see. i may get tired after my stator rewind and maybe go get a 40 amp r/r unit lol...
 

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Cindy - here is the absolute best way to test a stator. Check the voltage on each of the yellow wires going to the regulator. It should be 40-70 volts AC. Make sure you've disconnected the plug from the regulator before you do this. If it's quite a bit less, then it really is the stator.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
ehh i've decided to do it myself. that way i know its done right. there is actually and "art" to winding things. you dont just want the wires all wrapped around the poles like you make a yarn ball. that would drop effacy upwards of 30%. meaning 2 identical stators could have a difference of +/- 100 watts of each other, just by how neatly they are wound. you ideally want to have the windings all in the same direction, and as tight together as possiable without streching the wire.
 

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I wound one myself. It's no picnic! It lasted about 6 months and shorted to the laminations again. Unfortunately, I didn't realize that lamination shorting was the problem before I did the rewinding. If I had used some good tape to add more insulation, it might have lasted longer.

It's been so long that I can't rememember the turns per pole, but it was a tight fit with my poor winding skills. The wire gauge was #18, and I used a heavy insulated coating (not solderable).

The last, and final, replacement was well worth the $150 I paid including tax and shipping. I have sold the bike and bought a Yamaha Warrior. It doesn't require an engine removal to replace the stator!

Incidently, multiple strands of thinner wire generally do not fit as well because of the additional space taken up by the extra insulation, as well as, the round wire space loss, especially with twisting. The smaller wires may offset this effect slightly by fitting around corners better, but I wouldn't try it.

One possibility, however, is to use a heavier wire and fewer turns, or even just fewer turns with the #18. This will reduce the resistance and provide more power, but not at low RPM. If you don't let the bike sit at idle for long periods, this may be an easy way to get more charging power when cruising. I would worry about the regulator, however, as it can heat up some more.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
rdrabing said:
One possibility, however, is to use a heavier wire and fewer turns, or even just fewer turns with the #18. This will reduce the resistance and provide more power, but not at low RPM. If you don't let the bike sit at idle for long periods, this may be an easy way to get more charging power when cruising. I would worry about the regulator, however, as it can heat up some more.
Just wanted to make a note to this. Total wattage is produced by mass of your windings. by sticking with 18 gauge and using less windings you will produce less voltage (less turns). Your ampage will drop some (18 gauge limits it, and there is less mass) and by using watts=volts*amps, you will get lower wattage. That is before the regulator. The other key thing is the rpms in which what is produced.
 

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Post some of the sites you are finding this stuff, please. I may need it someday.
My stator is putting out 12.5 to 13.5, but not constantly.
thanks
 

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