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Discussion Starter #1
In the past I had a 650 cc bike. That was enough for me. It had lots of get up and go. Now they are making and pushing 1800 cc and bigger.

Other than bragging rights, what's the reason? They burn more fuel, cost more to start with and cost more to insure.

Doesn't a lighter weight bike handle better, maybe more fun on the curves?
 

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I like the mean streak 1500 because it handles extremely well for a larger bike. Even though its longer, its also lower. It still does well on gas too, about 45/gal. The one thing I really like about it is what it can handle. I don't worry about gusty crosswinds on bridges, big bumps in the road, or losing too much weight going over hills. The one thing I really love about it is its highway capability. I put in 5th and she hums at 3k rpm at 70 mph.
 

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I'll echo what LibertyPilot said. Don't get me wrong, I loved the 750 for its nimbleness and quickness, but I personally have always wanted that big bore v-twin feeling and sound. I worked my way up to the larger bike over a several year period, knowing I wasn't yet ready for a bike this large early on in my experience level. I eventually realized that I wanted more comfort for long trips, something the smaller bikes couldn't quite give me. I like the slower cadence of the 1500 engine, especially at the higher speeds. The 750 always seemed like it needed one more gear because of the higher rpms and the sound. I have no problem with the 750, and if I had the money, I would have kept it as a second bike, but it really hits the bumps harder, being lighter, and was always a monkey butt waiting to happen on long rides, even with the better seat, backrest and floorboards, with my 260 lbs riding on it.

The 1500 handles great, not quite to the level of the 750, but really good for a bigger bike, and it eats up the bumps in the roads. My mustang wide touring seat is 16 inches wide and really makes a difference on long stretches.

I've never ridden a VN2000 or VTX 1800 or one of the other huge bikes, but I would imagine the more weight makes them smoother riding, and some folks are really eaten up with having bigger, more powerful engines. My best friend and riding buddy has owned a Goldwing 1800 for several years, and he loves it for some of the 3000+ trips he goes on. He went all the way from Texas to Alaska and back last Summer on it. He's offered to swap bikes with me on some of our rides, but I'm not interested in trying to handle a bike that big. I think it weighs around 900 lbs and has a v-6 in it. I doubt I would ever have a desire to own a bike that large, but they are ridiculously popular, probably one of the better selling bikes in the country.

So, if they build it, there's always someone who will buy it I guess...
 

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Figures the three 1500 guys would chime in !

I agree with LP and fergy, tough I am at my limit. I think the VTX1800's and the V2K's are just way too big. I like to ride and handle and my Meanie does this very well yet offers the bene's LP and fergy mentioned.

I commute on mine a lot and it's mostly highway at 75 - 80 mph, the 1500 just does this WAY better than the 750 does.

And at 6 foot 235, I fit much better on the 1500 too!

Jon
 

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I am a big boy too,and I am thinking Nomad next,or the 2000 Vulcan because of the Belt drive,I am not ,nor never have been a fan of shaft drives,Character flaw I guess.But the Nomad is already set up with the windshield and hard bags.I love the sport tourers but have just about realized the were not made for short fat people and will probably upgrade to another big touring type twin
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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I am a big guy too. I was 6 foot tall from my teens, but my current #300 has compressed my spinal column by about 1 1/2". The 750 is my first bike, and like fergy, I bought it as a learner bike to get some experience on a powerful machine with out the disadvantage of heavy weight, and high cost of repairs in event of a fall down. I have only ridden one bike larger than mine, a Honda Shadow 1100 for about 40 or 50 miles, a year before I bought a bike.

I need a longer framed bike to accomodate my legs and belly more comfortably for trips longer than 30 minutes or so. It would be interesting to go for another ride on the 1100 Honda, to compare the fit after riding the Vulcan. If or when I ever get a larger bike it will likely be 1500-1600cc for the reasons also mentioned by others above, ie. lower engine speed, deeper exhaust note, more comfortable on the highway, handles wind and bumps better.

(Private note to denny. I think you know this, but just made a typo. The Goldwings are all horizontally opposed engines, or "flat" 4 or 6 cylinder, not a v-6. <G>)
 

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(Private note to denny. I think you know this, but just made a typo. The Goldwings are all horizontally opposed engines, or "flat" 4 or 6 cylinder, not a v-6. <G>)
Yup their boxer motors like VW's, Porsche's, BMW (bikes), some Ferrari's, etc. Most naturally balanced engine style mode.

Jon
 

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You guys are obviously missing the obvious and easy solution to this whole thing. Ya simply have to have a different bike for every mood and mode. At least three anyway.:pepper:
 

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That was my bad, Old Hoss! The "V" just seems to come out naturally.
One thing I didn't mention about the 1500 is how low you sit compared to the 750. The saddle is slung low in the frame and in my opinion, its easier for me to leg it around than the 750 was, albeit the thing weighs a couple hundred lbs more so it's probably a wash, but it seems easier to settle in when I pull up to a stop. Might be the stubbs I have for legs.:)

Of course, having the lower saddle, my legs don't have much more room to roam than the 750, plus the wider tank bothered the heck out of me for the first month but I quickly got used to that. There's always trade-offs. Like with any bike, I changed the seats out to the mustang wide touring models, with driver's backrest, bought risers to move the bars up and back toward me, then ended up buying an off set backrest bracket to move it on back an inch or so til I got everything right where I wanted it for comfort. Now it's my bike...
 

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In the past I had a 650 cc bike. That was enough for me. It had lots of get up and go. Now they are making and pushing 1800 cc and bigger.

Other than bragging rights, what's the reason? They burn more fuel, cost more to start with and cost more to insure.

Doesn't a lighter weight bike handle better, maybe more fun on the curves?
Yes it would. Perhaps we should all ride Ninja 250's instead.

Just because it is bigger does not always mean it burns more fuel. Nor that is is harder to start , and insurance is mostly based on vehicle cost , your location, your driving record, your age and not solely on engine size.
My neighbors 19 year old son pays 4 times the insurance I pay and my bike is over double the CC's.

Am guessing you drive a Prius or some other tiny fuel efficiant car.

If you have to ask why they make bikes with big motors , then you really just don't get it. And that my freind is a good thing.... ;)

KM
 

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Well human nature has always geared us towards MORE MORE MORE. Some researchers actualy point to part of it as Instinct. Why back the more food you got , the longer you lived, and so on. So the more you get- the longer you live (yes they actually published that paper). And most (maybe not all) people use a simple formula to gauge people.

money=success=good

Toys=money

But then again, i dont believe any two people can be judge by science or any other scale.

i wanted a Hog for forever, but in the end after driving um,and other bikes, I really dont care anymore, nowdays its the feel of the wind, and just being able to ride. BUT i must say, after riding my v750 in some 40 mph winds.. some extra heft would not suck, semi's make me feel like a leaf. the V-twin for me is the sound, nothing else.

i must admit my puzzlement comes from all the Asain bikes trying to look like hogs... why not just get a hog? But in the end, i think its just simple "we buy what we want" and we all want differnt things.
 

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I settled in on the 750 because of it being lighter and ease of handeling. I am 69 yrs old and a bum ticker, not very strong anymore. My previous bike was a Honda Shadow ACE 1100, it rode smoother but not enough to stick with it. Skip
 

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I understand the big v-twin deal, it is purely an emotional thing. It has a lot to do with the sound and feel. And touring bikes like the Goldwing need to be big (though my former 1100 Goldwing Interstate seemed more than big enough to get the job done) because they usually carry a lot of weight and a lot of stuff long distances. What I don't get is large displacement crotch rockets. I have owned two, a '93 Kawasaki ZX11, and a '94 Yamaha YZF1000. Both were bought used, and I didn't have them very long. They were two of the least favorite bikes I've ever had.

I understand the initial attraction, huge power, acceleration and top speed. But they absolutely suck at everything else. Way to uncomfortable for long distance riding, and way too big and heavy to handle well. My EX500 would outrun either one in the twisties, and is a lot less work to flick around curves. Sure they are fast in a straight line, but once the novelty of that wears off, and you realize that there is no place on earth you can use all that power and speed except a dragstrip, it becomes meaningless and worthless. You basically have a big heavy bike that is torture to ride, handles like a boat anchor, and has power and speed you can't use. I don't get it.


Now, I have also owned a Yamaha V-Max, and it was one of my favorites. Yes, it had more power than you could use, and it didn't handle very well, but it was 10 times more comfortable than those crotch rockets, which at least made it a practical motorcycle. And then there was the sound and the look. Completely opposite to crotch rockets. I have never cared for the look of crotch rockets, the EX has an old fashioned look that I really like. The V-Max was just wretched excess, without being uncomfortable, which would be attractive to any gearhead type. Unlike the sleek plastic covered crotch rockets, it was blunt, purposeful, and in your face. It had an attitude. It was also very straightforward and simple, it made power the old fashioned way, and there was no doubt what it's purpose was. It was king of the hill. That may be a part of the reason people like huge engines as well, my problem is that those huge engines don't put out huge power. When the 1500 Mean Streak first came out, a magazine compared the test results to the results from the original KZ900LTD, the first Japanese cruiser. The old KZ blew the Mean Streak away. Jerry.
 

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You guys are making me think of a larger blike, all though I love the VN750 for its nimbleness and seat height.

Just came from the dealer just one country mile down the road, he has started carrying
BMW's but they don't have the German quality of the BMW's of the 70s that I drooled over, but that VTX Honda sure looked inviting for an older person who is looking for comfort in a bike. My only question is how heavy of a bike do I need to hold the road better in windy conditions? Is a 1300cc heavy enough?
 

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........ My only question is how heavy of a bike do I need to hold the road better in windy conditions? Is a 1300cc heavy enough?

The real issue is not size or weight, but surface area. My Vulcan did seem to wish go with the wind alot more than my 1300cc FJR...But a stiff crosswind hitting a bike with a full fairing, bags and a top case will still cause some action.

Hell , my wifes Focus, which is a good 1800 lbs more than my bike will want to drift in a strong wind. A "bigger" bike is not a cure-all for laser tracking in a stiff wind.

But really , if you want to eat up hundreds of miles on a bike in a day, a reasonably large bike is just more comfortable than a small one. Most of which is related to the bikes mass because of the fundimentals of momentem....i.e. a heavy object takes more energy to move off its vector than a small one....thus little bumps , MILD wind gusts, expansion joints on the road, tend to cause less deflection on something that is heavy as opposed to light.

Smaller bikes do tend to weigh less...bigger ones weigh more.

Perhaps this is the reason for Jerry's comment on "crotch rockets" ( a phrase that does show ones prejudice right off...) this being that most of these bikes are engineered to be as light weight as current technology allows, but pack buttloads of power. So they are powerfull but weigh less than cruisers that are half their engine displacement.

A 1000 cc "crotch rocket" weighs over 100 lbs less than our "tiny" Vulcan 750. Out on the highway it be going fast for sure....but would pound the crap out of you on a long trip. It would of course still out handle pretty much any bike...but that is exactly the point in its conception. They are basicly race bikes, and many like the R1 or R6 are raced as is right off the showroom flow.
They are not meant as touring bikes, but full blown sport bikes...just as there are sports cars as opposed to SUV's , trucks, sedans, etc.

No one ever said a Ferrari was comfortable...they are just a blast to drive.....

KM
 

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I have no "prejudice" against any kind of bike. Perhaps "crotch rocket" was not the correct term for the bikes I had. They definitely did not handle as well as the Vulcan 750, but had way more power, which was not actually needed. I'll admit it is enticing though. The main issue I had with these bikes is how uncomfortable they were, and even as big as they were, with full bodywork, they still got blown around in the wind. They were "sport" bikes, but I found that at least for me, a much smaller sport bike works way better for what I consider "sport" riding, which to me means they will handle well while riding down a curvy road at high speed.


I have to admit I don't understand KM's choice of bike ( FJR1300) That bike certainly has plenty of power, and is capable of long distance travel, but I would not be capable of long distance travel on it, because of comfort issues (I have sat on one on the showroom floor, and found the bars too low, the pegs to far back, and the seat uncomfortable) On the other hand, most people consider the Vulcan 750 seat uncomfortable, while I think it is the most comfortable seat of any motorcycle I've ever owned. I guess it depends on the rider. Get the bike you like, but if you intend to rack up a lot of miles, I would put comfort first. I would do much better with a VTX1300 than an FJR1300 on a long ride, and have the Ninja 500 for shorter rides on curvy roads. I also have an XT225 (street legal trail bike) so I pretty much have all the bases covered. Jerry.
 

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I have to admit I don't understand KM's choice of bike ( FJR1300) That bike certainly has plenty of power, and is capable of long distance travel, but I would not be capable of long distance travel on it, because of comfort issues (I have sat on one on the showroom floor, and found the bars too low, the pegs to far back, and the seat uncomfortable)....

Well, keep in mind I am very Elf like in build. 5"9" with a 30 inseam and soaking wet barely hit 150 lbs. The FJR fits me quite fine...(I did add a Corbin seat which lowered me some...that also at the same time effectively raises the handlebars...solving 2 issues you pointed out.)

They do make risers for the bars, but no need to defend my choice here, as everyone has their own list of needs when it comes to bikes...or even cars. I find the FJR is alot more comfortable for burning off 300 to 400 mile days than the Vulcan, and is ALOT more comfortable riding 2 up.

No offence meant at your use of the term "crotch rocket" as by saying you were predjuced , you were basicly saying you did not like them , just echoing what you said...Alot of cruiser riders seem to call anything that is not a cruiser a "crotch rocket" when many of them are quite different. My FJR was called a "crotch rocket" by some HD rider...so just find the term a bit funny.

(Really, look at a guy with his legs spread out on the highway pegs of his Sportster and a geared up rider hugging the tank on is GSX and tell me which one seems to bring to mind the word "Crotch")

And I have a friend that wil pit his R6 against your Vulcan 750 anytime to show you what bike out handles what...;)


This whole thread seemed abit silly and did smell a bit Trollish to start with. Why do we need large engine bikes at all....? Indeed. LOL



KM
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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Well I did have a "Simplex" but I really wanted something larger...lol...
I am happy right now, who knows tomorrow I may get something else...lol...
Need is not what it is all about, if we only had what we needed, oh well, no way do I need what I already have...
You know that is why they make chocolate and oh well (can't spell vanilla)...lol...
Its just whatever flips the water off your lilly...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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HAWK
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As everybody said my 1500 Nomad just works for me, if I had the room I would have kept the 750 also but the Nomad does everything my 750 could do and more.
I have 2 stators and 2 R/R's so I have double the power for accessories.
Like they said cross winds don't bother me and I have done 500 mile days on the 750 and the Nomad, and I will say I could do more on the Nomad.
 

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Gnarly Jokester
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1500 Nomad

How much does your Nomad weigh? Do they still make the beasts?
Interested in moving up in weight, but could never sell my 06' VN750.
 
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