Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Crashes involving motorcycles happen. It’s just a fact. Some are just the motorcycle, some are motorcycles and cars. Many of these crashes result in the rider being hurt or killed. Most of us know riders who have been hurt or killed. It happens and it’s real. But there are things we can do to reduce the odds of us getting hurt. What it comes down to is two things: avoiding the crash and minimizing injury if there is a crash. Take the quiz below and see how you score on keeping yourself safe.

Avoiding the Crash

Hazard Perception
a. I look well ahead and see hazards long before I get to them
b. I look as far ahead as the vehicle in front of me so I can respond when it does
c. I look at the road right in front of me

Riding Skills
a. I have taken professional training to improve my riding skills and I practice them
b. I read a book or magazine article about riding skills
c. I figure I’ll just know what to do when the emergency happens

Being Seen
a. I have bright colors and retro-reflective material on my clothing, bike, and helmet to help me be seen
b. My jacket is black, but I wear a light colored helmet
c. I dress all in black and I ride a black bike

Drinking and Riding
a. I have a zero tolerance for alcohol when I’m riding
b. I often have a drink or two and then ride home
c. Drinking and riding is just part of what we do

Minimizing Injury

Protective Gear
a. I wear all the gear all the time (boots, sturdy pants, jacket with armor, gloves, helmet, and eye protection)
b. I wear a jacket and helmet
c. I only wear gear for long rides; around town I just wear a t-shirt and sneakers

Scoring: a = 2 points, b = 1 point, c = 0 points
If you scored 0 – 3 points: You are probably leaving a lot of your safety to chance, and the odds have a way of catching up with you. Look through the questions above for suggestions on how to reduce your risk of being in a crash.
If you scored 4 – 7 points: You are off to a good start. You seem to be aware that much of your safety is up to you and that there are steps you can take. Keep on that track and look for more ways to reduce your crash risk.
If you scored 8 – 10 points: Great job! You understand that what happens to you when you ride is your responsibility and you are taking action. Keep up those good riding habits – you never know when you will really need them.

Have to admit. I only got a score of 6 this time. I don't wear any bright colors when I ride and sometimes I wear only my helmet and boots with jeans and a T-shirt. Although all of these questions are important we should take note of the first one. It is OUR responsibility to be aware of what is going on around us. Unfortunately we will not be able to react to everything that happens but it is always good to be able to look at a situation and say, what if this happens? and have a plan to react if the situation occurs.

Have a good day and Ride Safe! :rockon:
 
  • Like
Reactions: FlaRider

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,750 Posts
Just three things:

1. Helmet
2. HiVis jacket
3. Ride like everyone is out to hit me!

Worked for 37 years.

Ride safe,

DT
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
126 Posts
i need to emphasize this....

the choice: "I wear all the gear all the time "

i think this is a biggie... the gear is only needed when the accident happens and since we don't know when that will be, we need to wear it all the time.
if you only wear it 90% of the time, the accident will happen during the 10% its off.

my worse injury was when i had just done some work on my dirt bike and decided to just 'ride it around the back to check it out'. so didn't put my helmet on... 5 minutes later i'm unconscious on the ground with a messed up retina after my head bounced on the hard clay.

my helmet would have saved my eyesight.
 

·
Drive less, ride more...
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
A most excellent post, VC.....in my personal opinion, if more riders internalized your above ideas and level of awareness, the MC accident/death rate would be much less than it is.

Also, I think it's obvious that if more riders took the above seriously, we as motorcyclists would garner a lot more badly-needed respect from the non-riding public.

You're absolutely right--even though the month of May has been designated as "Motorcycle Awareness Month" by the AMA and the US Congress, our safety is (unfortunately) ultimately our own responsibility.

In the spirit of your above posting, I'd like to offer the following link as food for thought to those who've not seen it...some of the info in it may save a crash or two someday--it's pretty cool:

http://www.highviz.org/
 

·
Adventuregeek
Joined
·
162 Posts
Scored 10 of 10, but I'm the methodical, analytical type.

I have done many activities considered dangerous. These include thousands of miles of inline road skating, roller hockey, and seven years of aggressive mountain biking. I've stayed out of the ER by learning from the mistakes of others, thinking about what I'm doing, and taking every reasonable precaution I can.

I'm following that philosophy for motorcycling too. I owe nothing less to myself and my wife (who rides her own, safely and in bright armored gear). Armor never made me invulnerable, but always lessened the damage when I ate it!
 

·
Love My Baby
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
I've seen too many accidents where the motorcycle rider winds up in ICU on a ventilator, and often dies. (I work in a major trauma center in south Florida). Most of the time these riders were wearing a helmet, but they were either drinking or running from the cops or riding like maniacs or some combination of the above. My take on this is that the three most important things you can do to stay safe are:

1. Avoid alcohol and drugs (even if you're not riding a motorcycle)
2. Ride like everyone is out to hit you (thanks Dirtrack650)
3. Don't assume your gear will help you one stinking bit. That assumption might make you more likely to take stupid risks, because you think you're protected.

I'm not saying not to wear the gear, just not to assume it will protect you or make you invincible. That would be just as stupid as wearing your seat belt and driving like a maniac because your seat belt will protect you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
Valuable reminder!!

Many Thanx VC! :beerchug:

Crashes involving motorcycles happen. It’s just a fact. Some are just the motorcycle, some are motorcycles and cars. Many of these crashes result in the rider being hurt or killed. Most of us know riders who have been hurt or killed. It happens and it’s real. But there are things we can do to reduce the odds of us getting hurt. What it comes down to is two things: avoiding the crash and minimizing injury if there is a crash. Take the quiz below and see how you score on keeping yourself safe.

Avoiding the Crash

Hazard Perception
a. I look well ahead and see hazards long before I get to them
b. I look as far ahead as the vehicle in front of me so I can respond when it does
c. I look at the road right in front of me

Riding Skills
a. I have taken professional training to improve my riding skills and I practice them
b. I read a book or magazine article about riding skills
c. I figure I’ll just know what to do when the emergency happens

Being Seen
a. I have bright colors and retro-reflective material on my clothing, bike, and helmet to help me be seen
b. My jacket is black, but I wear a light colored helmet
c. I dress all in black and I ride a black bike

Drinking and Riding
a. I have a zero tolerance for alcohol when I’m riding
b. I often have a drink or two and then ride home
c. Drinking and riding is just part of what we do

Minimizing Injury

Protective Gear
a. I wear all the gear all the time (boots, sturdy pants, jacket with armor, gloves, helmet, and eye protection)
b. I wear a jacket and helmet
c. I only wear gear for long rides; around town I just wear a t-shirt and sneakers

Scoring: a = 2 points, b = 1 point, c = 0 points
If you scored 0 – 3 points: You are probably leaving a lot of your safety to chance, and the odds have a way of catching up with you. Look through the questions above for suggestions on how to reduce your risk of being in a crash.
If you scored 4 – 7 points: You are off to a good start. You seem to be aware that much of your safety is up to you and that there are steps you can take. Keep on that track and look for more ways to reduce your crash risk.
If you scored 8 – 10 points: Great job! You understand that what happens to you when you ride is your responsibility and you are taking action. Keep up those good riding habits – you never know when you will really need them.

Have to admit. I only got a score of 6 this time. I don't wear any bright colors when I ride and sometimes I wear only my helmet and boots with jeans and a T-shirt. Although all of these questions are important we should take note of the first one. It is OUR responsibility to be aware of what is going on around us. Unfortunately we will not be able to react to everything that happens but it is always good to be able to look at a situation and say, what if this happens? and have a plan to react if the situation occurs.

Have a good day and Ride Safe! :rockon:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,236 Posts
I scored an 8 on that test but it didn't ask about what rubyrick brought out,I won't lie I ride too fast, too much,and I know I shouldn't but I'm like a rat eating D-con I love it and it might kill me.I have a Corolla and Oldsmobile and an old Dodge 4x4,for the times I don't have the urge to act like an almost 50 year old Idiot ,come to think of it, I'm going riding,Denny
 

·
Vintage bike addict
Joined
·
859 Posts
There wasn't any basic rider courses when I started. I don't believe loud pipes will save and I believe bright clothing is just as ineffective. I always wear my helmet. I always assume no one sees me or cares. For every other vehicle on the road I think "What is the dumbest thing they can do?" and I plan for it. I use that plan more often than not.
Save for mopeds and bicycles every other vehicle on the road is bigger than my bike. I give them the right of way. Road rage, drinking, anger or just being offended are indulgences best avoided when on two wheels. It's been 40 years since my first bike. This attitude and good maintenance have kept me out of harms way.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,927 Posts
There wasn't any basic rider courses when I started. I don't believe loud pipes will save and I believe bright clothing is just as ineffective. I always wear my helmet. I always assume no one sees me or cares. For every other vehicle on the road I think "What is the dumbest thing they can do?" and I plan for it. I use that plan more often than not.
Save for mopeds and bicycles every other vehicle on the road is bigger than my bike. I give them the right of way. Road rage, drinking, anger or just being offended are indulgences best avoided when on two wheels. It's been 40 years since my first bike. This attitude and good maintenance have kept me out of harms way.
+1 and an
Amen Brother.....


I think modulated lights, high vis gear make alot of sence, but there are no guarentees. After I saw a middle aged woman RUN A STOP SIGN AND HIT AN AMBULANCE THAT HAD ITS LIGHTS FLASHING AND SIREN BLARING that everyone at the intersection saw and heard coming from quite a ways off...I realized that you could be wearing a bright yellow clown suit and still some asswipe will turn right in front of you. Best off to expect it to happen and plan accordingly than to relay on anyone seeing you no matter what you are wearing.


KM
 

·
Drive less, ride more...
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
If you guys are advocating that riders always think and anticipate ahead, and have a "plan of escape" in case something stupid happens with an approaching threat, then obviously that's great feedback and anyone who deserves to be on a bike really should take that advice to heart....:smiley_th

However, none of the posts/threads/links given on hi-viz clothing or accessories ever said that they are "guaranteed" to always work all the time everywhere to prevent anything bad from happening.

But the data gathered over time behind these accessories does point out that riders who choose to employ them do spend more time riding and less time demonstrating their braking, swerving and cursing skills. Even the Hurt Report spells this out (e.g., see line item #14 in this report--"accident involvement is significantly reduced").

That's why the safety experts (who obviously also have years of riding experience) recommend we use them.

I hope this clarifies some of the earlier info posted...:)
 

·
Love My Baby
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
There is obviously a wealth of wisdom and experience here that we all can learn from. Taking in a bit from everyone can only make us all safer riders. Some excellent tips here guys. Thanks to all...
 

·
Recovering Dirtbiker
Joined
·
47 Posts
Being seen

* Pulse brakes early when preparing to stop at intersections or when using engine braking so that cars behind me will realize that I'm slowing down and have time to react.

I probably should buy a brake light modulator but I still think flashing the brake light slightly before you actually commit to braking sends a stronger signal to people behind you that you are preparing to stop. Cagers (even ones who only 1/2 way pay attention) are conditioned to slow down when they see brake lights.
 

·
The Reanimater
Joined
·
847 Posts
Well I started riding a MC in 1972.

I've never had or been in an Accident (Knock on Wood) Because I follow 3 little rules.

1: This MC can and will Hurt or Kill Me if I give it a chance too. So Don't!

2: Never Start or Put Myself in a Dangerous Situation...Like Weaving through cars or going around cars Blind.

3: ALL Other Drivers on the Road is/are Idiots! They are NOT watching out for You, So Make Sure Your Watching Out for Them.
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
These are all excellent suggestions. Now if we will all just put into action all that we know.

David Hough in his excellent book, Proficient Motorcycling, recommends monitoring the road for 12 seconds ahead of you. You can't see everything, but watch for patterns of behavior, similar to ripples in the river water when canoeing, indicating rocks below. ie. If everyone is making a little swerve to the left, while driving in the city, watch out for a hidden car in a driveway or back alley to your right.

If you are monitoring 12 seconds ahead effectively, you will spot any potential trouble with lots of time to slow down, move to a different lane, or turn off to avoid it.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top