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It's definitely weird, I'm having trouble coming up with a problem that would happen this way. It hasn't been sitting around, it's had the same oil, and this just began. But it works ok when it's cold, right?

About the only other thing is possibly the rack and pinion is sticking after it warms up.
 

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When I swapped out the clutch kit, the manual stated to put Moly on the pushrod before reassembling. If it is a part that needs to be lubed then it’s a definitely something that can stick I would assume.
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If you can get the center nut off the basket, you should be able to pull the pushrod out that side and see if it shows signs of sticking, clean it up if there's varnish built up.

It's just a straight rod, so should come out either side.

With an impact gun, you can hold the basket with a gloved hand to spin the nut off.

Another method to hold the basket without buying the tool... A penny between the gear teeth, or just stuff a rag in the gears. Totally harmless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
That nut is 98 ft.lbs. I'll see what I can do with it. I don't have a helper, so the holding tools with a handle wouldn't do me any good. Stuffing something in the gears seems like a better idea. It's going to be a while before the new parts come in, so I have time to mess with it a bit.
 

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I have the EBC Clutch tool and all things considered it is faster to use my dead blow hammer, 18 inch breaker bar and a penney between the gears. When my son and I split his case we went through about 6 cents tearing it down and going back together. The tool is a little too narrow, thin and the handle is shorter than I would prefer. I have only used it once

If you have a impact wrench it is easiest but I don't always use one. Sometimes to many tools, sockets, wrenches and an air hose make for a cluttered work space. Since I trip over my own shadow unless I am in a hurry I leave most of my air tools on the wall. Although there are times the only way to break a nut loose is with a good impact wrench a wrench without enough torque is just about worthless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I have the clutch plate and springs. I'm still waiting for the gasket to come from partzilla. I decided not to remove the nut. It would require removing the whole right side engine cover, along with a lot of other parts, and more gaskets. I'm going to put it back together with the new plates and springs, and if it still does the same thing, I'll look into taking it apart further. I'm starting to realize that being as old as it is, this bike is likely going to need a lot of parts in the future, some are not available, and the ones that are are on the expensive side, and aren't available from dealers. It seems to take forever to get original equipment parts when you order them online. Maybe I should start considering getting another bike in the future.
 

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The Clymer manual depicts a procedure for holding the basket and removing the nut with a large "vicegrip" type tool and others have held it with a strap wrench. Although I have read posts where the basket was broken by not using the correct tool and trying to use the ears of the basket incorrectly. (I guess that may be why I bought my EBC Clutch wrench in the first place.)

However, you can also access the pushrod from the other side by removing the clutch release mechanism sometime referred to as the little rack and pinion assembly of the forum. That way you can inspect those components and lubricate the rod without removing the basket. That procedure is also in the Clymer manual (with diagrams and pictures:)).
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I finally got all my clutch parts including the oem cover gasket. I have decided not to remove the pushrod right now. Removing it from the left side requires removing the pinion shaft, and there are teeth on that that mesh with the "rack" According to the manual, there is an oil seal that can be damaged by the teeth on the pinion shaft when removing it, and that seal does not seem to be available any more. Also there is supposed to be some special tool used to protect the oil seal from damage. I removed the threaded plastic cap on the left, the one with the slot in it, and sprayed carb cleaner in there until it came out the right side. I then used an oil can and pumped oil through the left side until it came out the right side. I'm going to replace the friction plates and springs and see what happens before going any farther.
 

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It sounds like what you have done should tell you if the rod is the problem. Over time though the use of oil instead of moly grease may actually gum up the rod and get stickie. have used some stuff from PB Blaster that is a kind of teflon/silicone lube. I use it on automobile door hinges and to lube vinyl clad house windows. it is supposed to hold up well over time. I don't know if it would work for the rod in place of moly or not.

I know I have taken my pinion assembly apart and not used any special tools. I often use plastic to protect seals when I need to. (Many timing chain covers on Fords use similar seals that can get damaged if not protested when removing them to replace a timing chain.) Usually the clear type that comes on packaging. Just cut it to the size that will wrap around the shaft real tight and slide it up past the seal

Hopefully you can get a season of riding in before you have any more problems. Good luck.
 
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