Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 115 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm tearing apart the engine on my VN750 with the intention of rebuilding it. I'm going to try and document the entire process in a series of YouTube videos.

Thanks to everyone for the tips so far, and please give me a shout if you have any more.

EDIT: I'm going to put all the videos in this first post to make them easier to find.

EDIT 2: I've also created a YouTube Playlist with all the videos

1985 Kawasaki Vulcan Engine Rebuilt Playlist

EDIT 3: I've been asked to note that the procedures in the videos are applicable to all model years from 1985 to 2006 for the Vulcan 700/750.

EDIT 4: Here is a crude spreadsheet with the cost



1985 Kawasaki Vulcan Engine Rebuild

Pt.1 - Removing & Disassembling Heads

Pt.2 - Removing Clutch, Starter Gear, Right Balancer, Right Cam Chains & Sprockets, Rear Cylinder, Stator & Cover

Pt.3 - Removing & Cleaning Valves, Removing HLA oil filter, Cleaning Heads

Pt.4 - Removing Flywheel, Left Balancer, Left Cam Chains & Sprockets, Front Cylinder

Pt.5 - Removing Final Drive, Damper Cam, External Shift Mechanism Cover, Oil Filter Plate

Pt.6 - Removing Pistons, Engine Case Bolts, Splitting Engine Case, Removing Crank Shaft, Transmission, Oil lines,

Pt.7 - Removing Water Pump Shaft, Water Pump Mechanical Seal, Oil Pump Sprocket & Chain, Balancer Shaft, Oil Pump, Left Side Oil Pipe, Oil Pressure Relief Valve, Oil PAssage Cover, Shift Drum, Shift Mechanism, Tie Rod & Shaft

Pt.8 - Bleeding HLAs, Checking Tolerances on Cam Shafts & Cam Shaft Covers

Pt.9 - Checking Tolerance on Heads, Cam Shafts, Cam Chains, HLA Leak Down, Valves, Valve Guides, Valve Seats

Pt.10 - Checking Tolerances on Valve Springs, Cylinders, Pistons, Piston Rings

Pt.11 - Checking Tolerances on Clutch Plates, De-glazing Clutch Plates, Checking Tolerances on Oil Pump

Pt.12 - Checking Tolerances on Crankshaft, Transmission, Honing Cylinders

Pt.13 - Lapping Valves

Pt.14 - Drilling Clutch Hub (Fix Coffee Grinder Noise), Installing Valves

Pt.15 - Installing HLAs, Rocker Arms & Springs

Pt.16 - Installing Oil Pump, Balancer Shaft, Oil Pump Chain & Sprocket, Oil Passage Cover, Oil Relief Valve, Oil Lines

Pt.17 - Installing Internal Shift Mechanism (Tie Rod, Shift Shaft, Shift Arm), Oil Pump Chain Guide, Oil Return Line, Water Pump Mechanical Seal, Water Pump Impeller & Shaft.

Pt.18 - Installing Shift Drum, Gear Position Lever, External Shift Mechanism Cover, Transmission

Pt.19 - Install Crankshaft, Combining Crank Case Halves, Oil Filter Plate, Starter Idler Gear, Right Side Balancer

Pt.20 - Install Left Side Balancer, Flywheel, Pistons,

Pt.21 - Install Cylinders, Cam Chains, Cam Chain Guides

Pt.22 - Install Heads and Spark Plug Retainers

Pt.23 - Installing Cam Shafts, Setting Cam Chain Timing, Installing Cam Cap, Cam Chain Tensioners, and Cam Shaft Cover

Pt.24 - Installing Flywheel, Primary Gear, Pick up coil mod, Shift Shaft Oil Seal, Left Side Engine Cover, Pick Up Coil Gap, External Oil Lines, Oil Pressure Switch

Pt.25 - Installing Clutch, Right Side Engine Cover, Clutch Cover

Pt.26 - Installing the Exhaust manifolds, Oil Drain Plugs, Carburetors, Starter motor, Final Drive Gearbox. Mounting the engine and starting the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Edit

Whoops, something went wrong with part 2.

I'll try to re-upload it tonight
 

·
Bat
Joined
·
161 Posts
There is nothing like seeing the job done firsthand, just being a fly on the wall and watching a masterful mechanic take things apart correctly and with explanations. Thanks for a great job on part 1, and I'm anxiously anticipating part 2!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #5

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,778 Posts
You must be a master mechanic, my hands never moved that fast removing stuff!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
448 Posts
Nice tear down. I have a comment tho, when you take the cams out would it be better to take out the ACCT's first? That way it takes tension off of the cams when you pull the plates off. I noticed that the cams were at an angle from the heads when you took off the cam plates from the tension on the chains. I believe it would also make it a little easier to get the cam plates off of the cams without the tension on the chain.
also are you going to replace the HLA's? If not does it matter which hole they go back in? I know on a multiple cylinder setup, I always put the valve train parts in order so that I can put them all back in the same order so they will wear the same. Especially a cam and lifters in a V-8 engine.
Again awesome job, I'm not telling you what to do of course, just a few comments. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
I might be jumping the gun on this...but went back to rewatch part 1 again and part 2 was uploaded although no link here yet..but here it is!

http://youtu.be/EdvB81YIyhQ

I'm outside today working on exactly what he's doing in the video...so hoping there's a part 3 for cracking the case...!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Nice tear down. I have a comment tho, when you take the cams out would it be better to take out the ACCT's first? That way it takes tension off of the cams when you pull the plates off. I noticed that the cams were at an angle from the heads when you took off the cam plates from the tension on the chains. I believe it would also make it a little easier to get the cam plates off of the cams without the tension on the chain.
also are you going to replace the HLA's? If not does it matter which hole they go back in? I know on a multiple cylinder setup, I always put the valve train parts in order so that I can put them all back in the same order so they will wear the same. Especially a cam and lifters in a V-8 engine.
Again awesome job, I'm not telling you what to do of course, just a few comments. :)
I should have taken the ACCT's off first. I'll be honest with you, this is the first time I've gotton my hands dirty on a four stoke.

There is a procedure in the service manual to check the HLA's. If they are within that service limit I'll try and re-use them.

It probably would have been a good idea to make a template for all the valve train components so they went back were they came from. The cams are marked so I can't get those wrong. But I didn't keep track of the rocker arms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I might be jumping the gun on this...but went back to rewatch part 1 again and part 2 was uploaded although no link here yet..but here it is!

http://youtu.be/EdvB81YIyhQ

I'm outside today working on exactly what he's doing in the video...so hoping there's a part 3 for cracking the case...!!
No worries.

I'm waiting on a 18mm x 1.5mm bolt to remove the flywheel. So it'll be a couple days before I get to the crank case.

Maybe I should be editing my first post in this thread with all the video links?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
No worries.

I'm waiting on a 18mm x 1.5mm bolt to remove the flywheel. So it'll be a couple days before I get to the crank case.

Maybe I should be editing my first post in this thread with all the video links?
Thx..didn't want to tick anyone off...:) I'd add the links to the first post.

Yeah..I got stuck at the 18x1.5mm bolt too and ordered it awhile back. I like the vicegrip tool you made too.

I'm currently stuck with trying to get the pair of 6mm nuts off that hold the cylinder head in place on the side of the cylinder. Apparently they've all but welded themselves on. Got them soaking in PB Blaster atm. My bike was pretty badly abused, so it's getting a complete teardown, restoration and probably some customizing along the way.

This is my first motorcycle restoration so I got really anal and printed out all the diagrams and parts lists and organized it into a notebook and I'm bagging and tagging each part as it comes off the bike and marking whether it needs to be replaced. It's tedious, but effective.
 

·
Young Gun
Joined
·
213 Posts
This is my first motorcycle restoration so I got really anal and printed out all the diagrams and parts lists and organized it into a notebook and I'm bagging and tagging each part as it comes off the bike and marking whether it needs to be replaced. It's tedious, but effective.
I did that when I rebuilt the carbs. I followed the manual and instead of tagging the name of each part, I found it helpful to tag which steps they were removed in (page#, step#)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
I did that when I rebuilt the carbs. I followed the manual and instead of tagging the name of each part, I found it helpful to tag which steps they were removed in (page#, step#)
I know whatcha mean! As closely as I'm following the manual on all this, I've got about 5 bookmarks running, since I have to jump back and forth between chapters almost every step in the instructions. I've got so many parts to order though, I'd never keep track, if I didn't highlight and mark the parts to replace as I go. My plan is to be able to order a microfiche page at a time and start building back from there.

On my seized nut issue..I've ordered a set of small nut splitters(should be here wednesday) that I think will get in there and crack the acorn nuts off. They've been soaking in PB Blaster for 2 days now..no effect. I've tried vice grips, etc...if the nut splitter doesn't work..I guess I'll have to dremel them off..but I'm hoping to avoid that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,778 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Kroil is the best penetrating fluid I know of. http://www.kanolabs.com/google/ Much better than PB blaster but expensive.
Thanks for the link! I'll probably try the Kroil and also another product Freeze-off, if the nut splitter won't get in there..I got the smallest splitter I could find, but it's gonna be tight on clearance. I really hate to cut them off with a Dremel and all 4 are in same condition. Doesn't seem to be rust so much, as probably seized from heat or severe over-tightening. I plan to replace both the studs and the nuts when I do the rebuild.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
1 - 20 of 115 Posts
Top