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Discussion Starter #1
I just got a set of SpeedBleeders for my vn750. I would like to replace the fluid. I've got about 8,500 clicks on the bike, and I'm guessing the fluid has never been changed (I'm the second owner).

I have a couple of questions, as I've never done this before.

First, it seems to me that when I install the SB, I will be removing the stock bleeder valves. Won't the fluid pour out during this process? Or will the fluid only exit the system if I depress the brake lever?

Now, do I have this right? Once the SBs are installed, the procedure would be to pop the cap off of the reservoir, attach the hose to one SB and open it up. Then slowly pump the lever to purge fluid, making sure to keep adding fluid up top to keep air out of the system. Once I see a steady stream in the hose (no air bubbles), close that SB and move to the other side and repeat. Then close that SB and fill the reservoir.

Sorry if my questions seem basic... this procedure is new to me. Just want to make sure I get it right.

Thanks in advance!
 

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basically thats right. I thought there were instructions with them. The fluid will come out if you remove the stock bleeder. Thats ok. Just put the new pimpalicious speed bleeders on and i believe you rotate them open 1/4 turn and pump the brake. There are excellent threads about bleeding brakes you should check out on here. It matters how intense you want to be. Some pump rubbing etoh through to get all the moisture out. I just used new fluid and pumped till all new stuff was in there. Then i tied the brake handle down overnight to compress the bubbles and make them rise.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I ordered them from the SB website and they arrived without any instructions. I have read a few of the threads here, especially one with lots of photos... although he wasn't using SB.
 

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I used a krystalveissen beer bottle i had laying around and just pumped the brake fluid into it. The speedbleeder website has little clear plastic baggys for when you are racing and need to pull the vulcan over to do a quick brake fluid change.
 

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I just got a set of SpeedBleeders for my vn750. I would like to replace the fluid. I've got about 8,500 clicks on the bike, and I'm guessing the fluid has never been changed (I'm the second owner).

I have a couple of questions, as I've never done this before.

First, it seems to me that when I install the SB, I will be removing the stock bleeder valves. Won't the fluid pour out during this process? Or will the fluid only exit the system if I depress the brake lever?

Now, do I have this right? Once the SBs are installed, the procedure would be to pop the cap off of the reservoir, attach the hose to one SB and open it up. Then slowly pump the lever to purge fluid, making sure to keep adding fluid up top to keep air out of the system. Once I see a steady stream in the hose (no air bubbles), close that SB and move to the other side and repeat. Then close that SB and fill the reservoir.

Sorry if my questions seem basic... this procedure is new to me. Just want to make sure I get it right.

Thanks in advance!
SpeedBleeders are a great maintenance product! Here are a few tips I've learned;

Installation:
  • Wrap a rag just below the brake bleeding valve to catch any brake fluid lost during installation.
  • Remove the master cylinder cap, top off the reservoir (fill it to the top) with brake fluid, then reinstall and secure the cap. This will help minimize the amount of fluid lost and prevent the master cylinder from running dry during the installation process.
  • If the existing bleeder valve does NOT have a rubber cap, then temporarily use the one provided with the SB valve. This will also help minimize fluid loss during installation.
  • Have the SB valve ready to install quickly after removing the original brake bleeder valve to limit the amount of brake fluid lost during the install. NOTE: only a small amount of fluid will come out since the capped master cylinder reservoir will generate a vacuum, reducing the flow of fluid.
  • The SB valves have thread lock and will NOT screw in easily by hand. It must be done by wrench. Do not be so overly concerned about the brake fluid leaking that you do cross thread the valves during installation. Take your time. Brake fluid is cheap, tapping the caliber is not.
  • Repeat on second caliber.
Bleeding:

IMPORTANT: SB should not be used to bleed a system that is completely dry. The brake system will not compress the air sufficiently to open the SB check valve. Initial bleed should be done using standard bleeder valves or no valve at all (i.e., gravity bleed). Install the SB valves AFTER the system has been filled with brake fluid.​

  • Install a length of clear tubing onto the SB valve. Loop the tubing straight up, then down into a clear container. The loop straight up will catch and hold the fluid close to the valve opening for inspection.
  • Open the master cylinder and top it off with fresh fluid.
  • Open the SB valve 1/4 to 1/2 way. The thread lock will prevent the fluid from escaping around the valve.
  • Pump the brake handle about 3/4 of the way. Don't pull the brake handle all the way to the handlebar, that might damage the master cylinder. Just pretend that you're pulling up to a stop sign with no other vehicles around. Slow and steady.
  • The check valve in the SB will close when the brake handle is released. Note: sometimes the brake handle will need a gentle push back to its fully extended position. Nice and easy.
  • Continue pumping and topping off the master cylinder (don't let it run dry!!!!) until the fluid coming out of the SB valve is clear and free of bubbles. Having the tubing loop just after the SB valve will make this easy to determine.
  • Close the valve.
  • Move to next valve and repeat the process. This will take less time since the primary line has already been flushed.
  • Test the brake function when all calibers have been bleed.
  • Repeat every 2 years.
After many, many uses the thread lock on the SB valve will wear away and allow fluid to escape around the threads. Remove the valve and reapply thread lock. Never had this happen, since I only change the brake fluid every 2 years and the thread lock last a long time.
 

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Your process is entirely right. When you unscrew the stock bleed bolt pesky gravity will leak out some of the fluid. If you do the off and on operation quickish you will be fine. Rags are a must.

I usually just offer a friend a beer and do it the old fashion way with 2 people. Speed bleeders seem entertaining though. If you are still not 100% ok with poking at the brakes/installing the speed bleeder- there are a couple videos on youtube if you search "motorcycle" and "speed bleeder".
 

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great write up on the process!
 

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Quite often while bleeding the brakes on my cars over the years, they would just gravity bleed and not need to have the brake pumped at all.

Is there some reason why the brakes on the Vulcan will not gravity bleed with the stock bleeders if the passage is clean and clear?
 

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I have sb on my street rod and I found that there was not enough thread sealer so I used some teflon tape since I did not have any sealer on hand and have not had any issues. as I said before use thread sealer thread lock is not the same because it is more watery and works like a glue. If used 1 you will not seal anything rendering them useless and 2 you will break them when trying to remove them. Thread sealer is in the same isle as thread locker. It is mainly used to seal the head studs on an engine that thread into water jackets like small block v8 and pretty much all automotive engines.
 

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Quite often while bleeding the brakes on my cars over the years, they would just gravity bleed and not need to have the brake pumped at all.

Is there some reason why the brakes on the Vulcan will not gravity bleed with the stock bleeders if the passage is clean and clear?
There is nothing wrong with using the stock or standard bleed valves to gravity feed, especially given the short distance between the master cylinder and caliber on most motorcycles. It is an easy 1 person job (active or gravity) as long as your arm's length spans the master cylinder and brake caliber. However, gravity bleeding, even on motorcycles, is like watching paint dry; slow and boring, IMHO. No offense to paint drying watching fans intended! In comparison, SpeedBleed type valves make bleeding very faster, very easier and foolproof. Best for racing bikes that change brake fluid often, but worth a few bucks if you want a fast, easy and foolproof 1 person brake bleed every 2 years. Think of all the beer you'll save by not having to have to bribe a buddy open and close the caliber bleed valve while you operate the brake.
 

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I have sb on my street rod and I found that there was not enough thread sealer so I used some teflon tape since I did not have any sealer on hand and have not had any issues. as I said before use thread sealer thread lock is not the same because it is more watery and works like a glue. If used 1 you will not seal anything rendering them useless and 2 you will break them when trying to remove them. Thread sealer is in the same isle as thread locker. It is mainly used to seal the head studs on an engine that thread into water jackets like small block v8 and pretty much all automotive engines.
Correct on every point! It is thread sealer, not thread lock that is used on the SpeedBleed threads. SpeedBleed has there own version to replace worn out thread sealer here for $10. However, it enough to last a lifetime. The teflon tape is a great way to bridge the gap and teflon tape has lots of other uses. Great tip! Thanks!
 

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I used a pressure / vacuum bleeder on mine in less than a minute I flushed a quart of fresh dot 4 through my brakes.
 

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Speedbleeders sound like just what I need to do when my bike gets to CO this November. I looked at the website and did not see the VN750 listed. Which model of Speedbleeder fits our bikes? Thanks!
 

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bleeder

speedbleeders sound like just what i need to do when my bike gets to co this november. I looked at the website and did not see the vn750 listed. Which model of speedbleeder fits our bikes? Thanks!
sb7100s
 

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Well, you guys got me all excited and I ordered these speedbleeders: http://www.jegs.com/i/Russell/799/639570/10002/-1?parentProductId=744478

Same diameter and thread as the speedbleeder.com SB7100S, but a little cheaper with shipping. I just realized they don't specify the length as speedbleeder.com does. Anyone used these on their bike or know if they will fit?
 

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Just to clarify things a bit, these are exactly the same as regular bleeder valves, but with one-way check valves. The bleeding process is exactly the same as with the stock bleeders, except that the check valve means you don't have to tighten it back down every time you release the brake (and thus loosen it up for every pump). The stock bleeders are essentially just a hole, which is why you have to open them to pump the fluid out then close them to avoid sucking air back in. The check valve in the SpeedBleeder allows the fluid to get pumped out without letting air back in.

Stock:
  1. Loosen bleeder
  2. Pump brake
  3. Tighten bleeder
  4. Release brake
  5. Make sure you have enough fluid
  6. Loosen bleeder
  7. Pump brake
  8. Tighten bleeder
  9. Release brake
  10. Make sure you have enough fluid
  11. Loosen bleeder
  12. Pump brake
  13. Tighten bleeder
  14. Release brake
  15. Make sure you have enough fluid
Repeat until finished.


SpeedBleeder:
  1. Loosen bleeder
  2. Pump brake
  3. Release brake
  4. Make sure you have enough fluid
  5. Pump brake
  6. Release brake
  7. Make sure you have enough fluid
  8. Pump brake
  9. Release brake
  10. Make sure you have enough fluid
  11. Tighten bleeder when finished
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks everyone for all of the info. As usual, the group here always has the answers! The write-up with photos is excellent. I plan on doing this at some point this weekend... was gonna do it after work tonight, but decided to go for a short ride instead... was gone for a few hours... so, maybe tomorrow.

Again, thanks everyone!
 
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