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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my 2001 Vulcan 750 for a little over a year, and everything has been working fine. I recently started having a problem with my turn signals. They work fine at idle, but at higher speeds they pretty much quit flashing, but do flicker a little. The signals themselves are fine, the switch seems to be ok, and I am getting right at 14V at 3000 rpm at the battery. Does this sound like it might be a problem with the flasher unit?
 

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If they’re not working at speed it may be due to vibration or heat. The signals flicker when the relay doesn’t detect enough current flow when switched on. Maybe a wire or connector is touching and shorting out or some corrosion. If you tested that everything works electrically then I’d think the wiring would be the next step.
 

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I agree with mmart's assessment.
Is it speed related or rpm related? At the very least it is worth cleaning the contacts at the flasher before replacing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's rpm related. Signals work perfectly at idle, but when you rev the engine, they stop blinking normally and mostly stay on with some random flickering. Does the flasher come apart? I discovered a new one costs $80+ If it is the flasher, is there a less expensive alternative?
 

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To me that sounds like something could be vibrating still. As far as the relay goes, there’s plenty on eBay for cheap. Especially if you’re looking for the stock relay. Any model year will work. I switched to LED bulbs and swapped out the relay. The replacement wasn’t very expensive either. I think it was only $10. It’s a few years and its still working.

 

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As far as troubleshooting goes, you can unbolt the flasher and hold it in your hand to see if removing the vibrations does anything. Would maybe help narrow down the problem.
 

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It’s possible the flashing unit is bad. When you roll on the throttle you also increase the voltage coming from the stator/R/R. As the flasher is voltage “sensitive” its possible it shorted somehow making it do what you describe.
You should be able to find a flasher for a lot less than $80.00
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, I removed the flasher and held onto it. It's still doing the same thing. I'm still looking for a possible loose wire, but it's beginning to look like it might be the flasher. The hazard flashers are doing the same thing. Meanwhile I had some other things go wrong. I went to put air in the tires this morning, and the valve stem on the rear wheel broke off. It was hard and brittle. The PO had just replaced the tires shortly before I bought it, but I'm pretty sure that was a really old valve stem. So I was removing the rear wheel to take it to a shop to get the valve stem replaced, and when I removed the right muffler to get the axle out, I discovered the part that slips over what you call the "goats belly" was cracked about halfway around, where it attaches to the muffler body. I don't know if I broke it or if it was already cracked. I found a couple on eBay, but if mine cracked, those might be too. I think I'm going to try and find somebody to weld it. Everything has to go wrong at once.
 

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I had both of these happen to me, for the valve I used a piece of board and a huge C-clamp to break the bead and squeeze the tire. I popped in the new valve and then reset the bead with a ratchet strap and small compressor. I ran the strap around the full circumference of the tire but since then learned you can reset the beads with large zip ties.
As far as the muffler clamp. This was a little trickier. I ran one small screw on an angle through the clamp into the muffler to lock them together then took a healthy dose of JB weld high heat to “re-weld” the joint. I did this once before without the screw and used standard JB and it cracked again. The 2nd fix seems to be holding. Best of all it’s hidden under the heat shield.
Gas Tints and shades Auto part Metal Automotive exhaust
 

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There might be some old valve stems in the supply chain. Last week someone told me about getting new tires and one of the new valve stems broke off in a couple of days.

Those mufflers are prone to cracking right where the pipe meets the muffler body, a mig welder will zip it up but mmart's fix will work. I have a cracked muffler myself, but I replaced all the exhaust on mine. My exhaust came from a member in Texas.
 

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There's actually some "cold weld" welding rod available, never used it but it seems to work well. Using those rods you can weld with a propane torch.

We used to have a forum member making aluminum light bars, he used the cold weld rods to weld the brackets and box them in, they looked good.


The rods above are $20, these below are $5.57.

 

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I used these before when I replaced the door on the tool box. I went with these because I cut the new door with diamond plate aluminum and some aluminum hinges. I was pleased with the outcome but about 6 months after the fact I hit a decent bump and the welds broke clean off and the car behind me ran my work over. Somehow I was able to salvage the lock and reflector. Eventually I’ll redo it
If I’m not mistaken these are really only for welding aluminum to aluminum, I don’t know if they’ll bond to the steel on the mufflers.
 

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I used these before when I replaced the door on the tool box. I went with these because I cut the new door with diamond plate aluminum and some aluminum hinges. I was pleased with the outcome but about 6 months after the fact I hit a decent bump and the welds broke clean off and the car behind me ran my work over. Somehow I was able to salvage the lock and reflector. Eventually I’ll redo it
If I’m not mistaken these are really only for welding aluminum to aluminum, I don’t know if they’ll bond to the steel on the mufflers.
I remember that now. I was thinking that pre-heating might help with penetration.

I'm pretty sure this is the same thing, I watched an ad and they were welding steel then bending the heck out of the parts, hammering and twisting, the welds never budged.

I'm going to order 20 and see. Been wanting a mig welder bad, I just spent days stick welding on a mower deck. If those rods work as they claim, I should've been using that instead.
 

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If you don't want to take it to a local muffler shop to have it welded (they would probably only charge $20.00 or so) I would try the JB Weld method. I have reinforced the JB epoxy by laying a coat down then wrapping a strip of metal window screen on that, following with a final coating of the JB all while still mixed so as to harden at the same time. I have not had any luck using the aluminum alloy rod for steel. It is pretty much a low temp solder and does not penetrate the steel.

You can do the tire yourself, depending on your physical condition and experience. I eventually bought a tool from Harbor Freight but originally broke the bead with anything from large C clamps to dead blow hammers. You only have to get the broken part out and gain access to the hole. Replace the rubber stem with a metal stem and don't worry about replacing it again. You can buy the valve stem's core ("insides") separately and replace those as needed. I hate rubber stems having had problems long ago with vandals cutting them.
 

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I was posting while you were but if you have a oxy setup braze the damn thing. I used to tear off my exhaust all the time on my old cars as a teenager and kown for fact brazing rod would work great for what you need. I have a mig welder but I miss gas for some things.
 

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I purchased some Alum-Alloy welding rod at a Hot August Nights swap meet years ago and have tried using it several times since then. The last time was only a week ago. I was making a bracket to mount my granddaughter’s birdhouse (her summer granddad project before starting 4th grade). I was using galvanized Simpson tie brackets that I ground the coating off and got down to bare steel and used MAP gas. I had a great looking bead and did fill holes drilled in the top piece (like a simulated spot weld) and was stoked at how everything looked. After it cooled off I loosened the vice grips and c-clamps to take it out to prep it for painting. While I was admiring how well the bead looked when I dropped it on the garage floor and it popped apart like I had used one of er glue sticks from art class. I spent another hour heating it up and knocking off the alloy, grinding it then welding it with the Mig like I should have to start with.

Initially, I wanted to uses it to weld the broken mounting tabs on some of my 1970 Ford front grills. However they are not pure aluminum and it is so hard to heat up the material to be welded and the rod at the same time it is too easy to melt the base metal into oblivion. It works much like solder on copper pipe for a “sweat weld”although I do not know if it is approved for use in plumbing or not. I have used it to fasten a top piece over a cracked bracket and let the rod flow between the two halves of metal. It also looked good but after one season popped apart like hot glue would have. It could be the fact that I am using MAP gas and the material just is not compatible but the guy at the swap meet was welding soda cans to beer cans. Seemed like a good idea.
 

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I used these before when I replaced the door on the tool box. I went with these because I cut the new door with diamond plate aluminum and some aluminum hinges. I was pleased with the outcome but about 6 months after the fact I hit a decent bump and the welds broke clean off and the car behind me ran my work over. Somehow I was able to salvage the lock and reflector. Eventually I’ll redo it
If I’m not mistaken these are really only for welding aluminum to aluminum, I don’t know if they’ll bond to the steel on the mufflers.
That has to be one of the coolest mods I've seen here. I'd love to do something similar. I don't have the right tools do so, however. How much did that weigh when it was finished?
I wonder how well sheet aluminum would hold up? I've never seen chrome-like polished aluminum sheets for sale, but I'd consider trying that just to save weight.
 

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It’s a 12x12 1/8 inch thick aluminum diamond plate sheet. Got it at Home Depot, I have enough left to cut one more top case door. It’s real light, borderline too light, but for what I used it for was fine. I’m just going to rivet the hinges next time instead of trying to braze them again.
You know, I'm a big fan of nuts and bolts, and besides, I have practically zero tools. My truck was stolen two years ago. They left my wallet with cash in it ($700) in the center console, but cleared out the entire covered bed. I'm still fighting with the insurance company over it.

I like the idea. I'll see if my neighbor would help do it. It definitely looks badass.
 
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