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I work full time on heavy equipment which includes snow plows and salt trucks and the electrical systems take a real beating. At the shop all the mechanics use a product from Truck Lite called NYK-77 which inhibits corrosion , conducts electricity as well as weatherproofs the electrical connections and light sockets. I am currently going through my newly acquired vulcan and putting NYK on most of the electrical connections and light sockets. Dielectric grease should never be used on electrical connectors or light sockets because it does not conduct electricity. Just a tip that I thought might help with corrosion prevention
 

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It is made for electric circuit use. You could google it and read about it .The stuff saves alot work in the long run
 

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Ok now I'm confused, because every mechanic and anyone that knows the electrical system of a vehicle I've ever known has always said to dielectric grease all your electrical connectors. This is even one the of things on the list to do first when you get your Vulcan in the Verses. Why would everyone say this if you should not use it?
 

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NYK-77 is a non conductive compound...it is a petroleum hydrocarbon grease and really, not much different that any other dielectric grease.

Oddly a check of a few sites on the internet I found one that actual says dielelectric grease is conductive...(which is wrong):

http://tinyurl.com/y937p4f

The guy talking n the video does not know what he is talking about, and someone should straighten him out....lol

Here is an article on how to use dielectric grease:

http://tinyurl.com/yayqyts



It is odd that so many folks are confused about it when if you just look up the word dielectric , it says right off that it means NON Conductive...or more simply , an insulator.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dielectric

NYK 77 is just another non conductive grease, which are used as insulators AROUND connections to dispel water and corrorsion.

I actually prefer the silicone based dielectric grease as it handles higher temps better.

http://www.super-lube.com/silicone-dielectric-grease-ez-52.htm


KM
 

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If it conducts electricity wouldn't it cause a short at the connections?
X2
If it's conductive, that'd be just like connecting a positive wire directly to a negative wire in a light socket.

I'll stick with good old dielectric grease.
 

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Just as a follow up, I got a response from the site above that had the video that said dielectirc grease was conductive. Seems the were aware of it but did not wish to confuse people:


Eric,

Thank you for asking the following question:
dielectric grease is not conductive you moron.



Answer:
You are correct, it is not a conductor. It prevents corrosion without being an electrical insulator.

Many of our customers are not electrical savvy and I am sure it was said the way it was said in the video to prevent customers from thinking it would insulate the connection.

This video is posted on YouTube and there are a lot of comments discussing the topic.


So fine, question now is should I point out that it in fact is an electrical insulator?? LOL

Well, as long as those here know what to do with the stuff I think I'll just let it go...........LOL


KM
 
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