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Discussion Starter #1
I was riding home from work yesterday and noticed one of the roads have these long 'trenches' running down the middle of it. Its hard to describe. Its like there have been so many cars on that road that the tires dug trenches running the length of the road. Even between the 'trenches' isn't good to ride on because it like the 'crest' and I can't seem to get the tires to balance. I never felt more like I was going to lay the bike down. It felt like the front wheel and back wheel were out of sinc. Yeah I could take another road but its really outta the way and the 'trenches' are only in one spot. Just wondering if anyone had any experience with this and had any suggestions?
 

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Asphalt road with heavy truck traffic,or the road separating where two strips of asphalt are laid down together length wise, We see a lot of both around here where there are a lot of coal trucks hauling and other tractor trailer rigs running, dangerous riding usually on uphill grades or at stops, any where they have to travel slowly.Be Safe out there.
 

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I-5 has this problem along my 34 mile commute. These trenches happen during the summer months when the asphalt is hot and heavy trucks 'sink' forcing the the asphalt to 'mound up' between the trenches. Adds the aspect of pay attention when riding.
IMHO it's cheap asphalt that's causing the problem - I don't remember this 10-15 years ago. I ride old 99 (built in the 40's) at times where the original cement is still in place - it's bumpy where the sections meet but it's still there in fairly good shape.
 

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^ Makes perfect sense the road is between a construction site and quarry. Its got hundreds of dump trucks loaded from the quarry back and forth all day...
 

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I find the same thing here in places due to the heat and heavy trucks. There really is no good answer. Riding the "crest" is not an option, so I ride the "trench" on the side that makes sense for that situation.

Jon
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I actually saw yesterday that they scrapped over the road where it was the worst. They did what they do when they're getting ready to repave but didn't repave. So now its course but not 'trenchy' there. Its still pretty bad at the previous 2 intersections but I guess I gotta deal. I was going to tell the township about it but they're apparently aware of it already. I have a feeling it won't be as bad once constuction ends but its not like the quarry is going anywhere anytime soon. I'll check a map and see if there's a better way to circumvent that road.
 

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A stretch of freeway near here has longitudinal grooves in it. Not exactly the trenches you're dealing with, but similar. The stock tires would hop and skip all over the darn place. After I got the Metzlers, no problem. Made all the difference.
 

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There are a couple spots on my route home like that, usually worst at the intersections, and it makes splitting very dangerous. I usually ride in one or the other, depending on the situation. You could check with your local highway / street maintenance dept. to see if there are any rules as far as how much deviation in the level of the road surface is allowable before it constitutes a safety hazard and needs to be repaved.
 

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Those "grooves" or "trenches" sound a lot what like what David Hough calls "road traps" in his book "Proficient Motorcycling". He likens road traps to "curbs in the road", that prevent a motorcycle from steering when you get up against it with a tire. When you need to get out of it, to turn a corner for example, you do not want to try to slowly ease up out of the trench like you would in a car.

You need to slow down and ride out of it as perpendicular to the trench or "curb" as possible, preferably at no less than a 45* angle. That will be difficult in a narrow trench, so take it easy and watch out for tailgaters if you have to ride on roads like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You could check with your local highway / street maintenance dept. to see if there are any rules as far as how much deviation in the level of the road surface is allowable before it constitutes a safety hazard and needs to be repaved.
Great idea.

You need to slow down and ride out of it as perpendicular to the trench or "curb" as possible, preferably at no less than a 45* angle. That will be difficult in a narrow trench, so take it easy and watch out for tailgaters if you have to ride on roads like that.
Great advice!

Thanks fellas...
 
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