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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, not sure I have seen this directly addressed here so gonna give it a go.

As I have said several times I am new to motorcycle riding. About 3 months under my belt. That said, I feel pretty dog on confident on my bike riding the turns and corners we have here when dry outside-there are actually some pretty good roads to ride if you know where to look.

But, I am leary of any turn-not matter how 'dull' or slight it may be when it is wet or I have just passed through water. I know the only REAL answer to these questions will be experience and all the other factors involved-tires, oil on the road, acceleration, braking, etc.-but I would love to get some ideas and opinions. I don't want to have to fall to learn the limits of my bike.

So-Just how good is the grip on this bike when cornering on wet stuff? I know it's good when dry and I have leaned mine over and almost scraped the footpeg (had a buddy following me just to see how close I was). But honestly, I am plumb scared:eek: when it comes to sharp turns or even turning at red lights when it is wet outside. Overly cautious might be a better description. Maybe it is an irrational fear, but I am scared I am going to 'eat it'.

So do you people have any input and/or videos that would help me and other riders that are specific for the 750?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
all traction (wet or dry) depends greatly on the tires on the bike. not just the brand, but the condition and age.
Agreed. Mine are pretty new and in good shape. But I was trying to get a 'general' idea of what to expect in turns when wet versus dry. Again, I know for a real answer it will come down to actually testing and seeing, but I am wary of pushing it too far as I stated in my OP. And who wants to ride around testing puddles and wet roads???

Ex: I was coming in to work the other day. It rained the previous evening and the roads were dry by morning. But there was a puddle in the road on a turn at my place of employment. I usually take this 90 turn at 25mph or so-no big deal. But as I approached and saw the puddle, I began to freak out cause I am thinking "I am gonna hit this mug and wipe out in the work entrance".

Maybe I just need to stick to only dry pavement....HA!
 

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all traction (wet or dry) depends greatly on the tires on the bike. not just the brand, but the condition and age.
X2 but I would also add tread design. Some tires are much better on the wet than others. My advice to you is get out and ride and get as much experience as you can in all conditions. Slow down, be cautious, and live to ride another day. Based on your original post I believe you are pushing the bike too hard for only 3 months experience. JMO
 

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Discussion Starter #5
X2 but I would also add tread design. Some tires are much better on the wet than others. My advice to you is get out and ride and get as much experience as you can in all conditions. Slow down, be cautious, and live to ride another day. Based on your original post I believe you are pushing the bike too hard for only 3 months experience. JMO
The bold part...I wouldn't do it if I didn't feel safe doing so-which is why I slow when wet. Believe me when I say-I am good at what I do. I have several buddies that ride with me and tell me that I progressed very fast in cornering and just overall riding. Not bragging...just saying.

I know 4 wheelers are a different animal, but they have similar characteristics when riding. Been doing those for years. Also, in those 3 months I have put over 3500 miles on this bike. Usually in 30-40 mile increments except for my commute to work-25 miles. My point is, I am on the bike a lot even though it may seem like 3 months isn't that long of a time. I have had 3 long rides-100 miles or so. Other than that it's all back roads and the curviest I can find.
 

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2014 KLR 650!
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I ride in the rain all the time and have yet to slip out. That said I don't dog it around corners when it's wet. If you want to see how easily a tire skids when its wet, hit the back brake next time you're out. Doesn't take much to slide that rear tire when wet. I watch out for large turn arrow paint and cross walk paint especially. It's thick and wide and like flippin ice sometimes.

Maybe hit a big parking lot on a wet day and do some turning. Oh and my tires are dual sport on a 550 lb sportster so by all accounts they should seriously suck on wet roads. But I love ridin to work so.
 

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Have you ever fishtailed or spun a 180 in a car? Ever gunned a car engine on a wet road and felt the rear end slip out on you? Remember how easily it seemed to happen? Motorcycles can do the same thing. Always slow down on wet roads. Be cautious and go as slow as you feel like you need to.

We could get all scientific and talk about how the various forces act on a motorcycle in a turn and the contact patch of the tire meeting the pavement providing a certain amount of friction that will keep the bike from slipping up until a certain point, but when you are riding I highly doubt you are going to be able to do all of the calculations required to determine your maximum safe speed for a given turn, angle and slipperiness of the road before you enter the turn. The only way to know is to ride and get experience and even then it just takes a split second for you to hit a bump in a turn and goose the throttle a little too much and go down on a wet road. So be cautious and go slow.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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Ride in snow.then wet roads will be cake;).don't tense up either.stay loosey goosey. Watch out for the middle of the road in the rain,especially at intersections as oil builds up there.and don't let yourself feel overconfident, EVER! Always be alert as no matter how good ya are,something can bite ya.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Have you ever fishtailed or spun a 180 in a car? Ever gunned a car engine on a wet road and felt the rear end slip out on you? Remember how easily it seemed to happen? Motorcycles can do the same thing. Always slow down on wet roads. Be cautious and go as slow as you feel like you need to.

We could get all scientific and talk about how the various forces act on a motorcycle in a turn and the contact patch of the tire meeting the pavement providing a certain amount of friction that will keep the bike from slipping up until a certain point, but when you are riding I highly doubt you are going to be able to do all of the calculations required to determine your maximum safe speed for a given turn, angle and slipperiness of the road before you enter the turn. The only way to know is to ride and get experience and even then it just takes a split second for you to hit a bump in a turn and goose the throttle a little too much and go down on a wet road. So be cautious and go slow.
I have slid on purpose on this bike. I gun it in my driveway (dirt-and about 2/10 of a mile long) on purpose just to make it fishtail....having fun..spinning tires. I'm a daredevil my friends tell me. It's just those turns still kinda scare me off in the rain. Thanks.

Ride in snow.then wet roads will be cake;).don't tense up either.stay loosey goosey. Watch out for the middle of the road in the rain,especially at intersections as oil builds up there.and don't let yourself feel overconfident, EVER! Always be alert as no matter how good ya are,something can bite ya.
Hahahaha. No snow in South Georgia....EVER!!!! OK. Once every 15 years we might get an inch or 2.

But don't be paralyzed with fear to ride in the rain either.
I've done it. Just way slower around turns and corners. That's what rain suits are for...and windshields.

Guess I'll just have to strap on a bunch of clothes and go shred it up when it rains to find out...HAHAHAHAHAHAH!
 

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No offense, but contrary to your other posts it seems with this one you asked a question you already should know the answer to.....
Wet roads decrease available traction.
Car, truck, bus, motorcycle, or bicycle, they all lose some grip on a wet road.

It's not so much how new your tire is, but how well the tread can channel water off from under it. Remember the ONLY reason street tires have tread/grooves is to help it work in the rain.

And only you can gauge how much you need to back off from normal dry road riding to safely deal with wet roads. No one can give you a percentage to dial back from as none of us know exactly how you ride.

So the basic answer is slow down, leave more space between you and traffic for braking.... And you should already know this ;)


(And saying you're a daredevil at the same time you admit to being afraid sounds like a contradiction....but that's good...you should always be a little afraid)
 

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But don't be paralyzed with fear to ride in the rain either.
. That's what rain suits are for...and windshields.
absolutely, don't be afraid of the rain, respect it.

as far me personally, I don't fear the rain, I ride in it, no windshield and no rain gear. Now, I will qualify this, as I normally only ride in the rain on the way home (and rarely to) work. therefore I can dry off and change when I reach my destination.
 

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OP, you starting an "I have questions" thread, then when you get answers, saying you already knew that notwithstanding - your first answer is: don't ride in the rain. The next simplest in order is: if ya gotta ride in the rain, slow down.

You want my bacon mataphor? Yeah ya do. Your dry tire-to-road traction is like when you first throw bacon on the pan - it sticks like crazy. A pry bar ain't getting that bad boy off there. After it starts to crackle and get greasy is your wet tire-to-road traction. That little piggie is slidin' all over that pan like a figure skater. What? I love bacon. :D

Being a helicopter pilot and so having a pretty good idea of what falls into the safe catagory and what falls squarely out of it, I can say that daredevils in the rain on motorcycles do NOT qualify as something I, or most other people, would consider safe. You can feel as indestructable as you want but those road-side rocks waiting on the outside of your tight turn in the rain don't give a single flying droplet of sh!t about how you feel when you low-side it from too much bank. I promise you'll feel them though. Be smart = be safe.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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And new tires are like cooking bacon on a flat top after spraying it down with pam spray.bacon?I like bacon.bacon wrapped cheddar chili cheese dog with mayo,mustard,hot sauce,diced raw onions, and kraut
 

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2014 KLR 650!
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OP, you starting an "I have questions" thread, then when you get answers, saying you already knew that notwithstanding - your first answer is: don't ride in the rain. The next simplest in order is: if ya gotta ride in the rain, slow down.

You want my bacon mataphor? Yeah ya do. Your dry tire-to-road traction is like when you first throw bacon on the pan - it sticks like crazy. A pry bar ain't getting that bad boy off there. After it starts to crackle and get greasy is your wet tire-to-road traction. That little piggie is slidin' all over that pan like a figure skater. What? I love bacon. :D

Being a helicopter pilot and so having a pretty good idea of what falls into the safe catagory and what falls squarely out of it, I can say that daredevils in the rain on motorcycles do NOT qualify as something I, or most other people, would consider safe. You can feel as indestructable as you want but those road-side rocks waiting on the outside of your tight turn in the rain don't give a single flying droplet of sh!t about how you feel when you low-side it from too much bank. I promise you'll feel them though. Be smart = be safe.
ONly padowons cook bacon on a skillet anymore. Cook the whole pound at once as follows,

1. Line a broling pan with tin foil.
2. lay out your pound or more of bacon so it fill sup that fkin pan.
3. turn your oven to 425
4. put the bacon in, no pre-heating
5. set your timer for 20 minutes for thin bacon - 25 for thick.
6. Eat that pork belly goodness.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
No offense, but contrary to your other posts it seems with this one you asked a question you already should know the answer to.....
Wet roads decrease available traction.
Car, truck, bus, motorcycle, or bicycle, they all lose some grip on a wet road.

It's not so much how new your tire is, but how well the tread can channel water off from under it. Remember the ONLY reason street tires have tread/grooves is to help it work in the rain.

And only you can gauge how much you need to back off from normal dry road riding to safely deal with wet roads. No one can give you a percentage to dial back from as none of us know exactly how you ride.

So the basic answer is slow down, leave more space between you and traffic for braking.... And you should already know this ;)


(And saying you're a daredevil at the same time you admit to being afraid sounds like a contradiction....but that's good...you should always be a little afraid)
Betcha Evel Kneivel ws scared before each jump. Now what !!!??? But I get what your saying. BTW-I don't get offended-It's cool.
OP, you starting an "I have questions" thread, then when you get answers, saying you already knew that notwithstanding - your first answer is: don't ride in the rain. The next simplest in order is: if ya gotta ride in the rain, slow down.

You want my bacon mataphor? Yeah ya do. Your dry tire-to-road traction is like when you first throw bacon on the pan - it sticks like crazy. A pry bar ain't getting that bad boy off there. After it starts to crackle and get greasy is your wet tire-to-road traction. That little piggie is slidin' all over that pan like a figure skater. What? I love bacon. :D

Being a helicopter pilot and so having a pretty good idea of what falls into the safe catagory and what falls squarely out of it, I can say that daredevils in the rain on motorcycles do NOT qualify as something I, or most other people, would consider safe. You can feel as indestructable as you want but those road-side rocks waiting on the outside of your tight turn in the rain don't give a single flying droplet of sh!t about how you feel when you low-side it from too much bank. I promise you'll feel them though. Be smart = be safe.
Who doesn't love bacon? I don't mean to sound like a know-it-all.

I guess I should've made my OP a little more pointed. I can lean that mug over as far as I want when it is dry doing 70mph around a pretty tight turn. I know I can't do it when wet. So, maybe I should say Has anyone here had it slide out from under you when wet and at what speed? Again-I know tires and tread would be the biggest variable here.
 

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Paul be careful with your front brakes on wet surfaces. When I rode your bike a few weeks ago they kind of grabbed due to I think there is air in the line or something as they seem to catch. Get that fixed and I believe that you will have no worries.
 

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ONly padowons cook bacon on a skillet anymore. Cook the whole pound at once as follows,

1. Line a broling pan with tin foil.
2. lay out your pound or more of bacon so it fill sup that fkin pan.
3. turn your oven to 425
4. put the bacon in, no pre-heating
5. set your timer for 20 minutes for thin bacon - 25 for thick.
6. Eat that pork belly goodness.
Yep...Baking bacon is the way to go. I wrinkle up the foil before I put it in the pan so the slabs aren't laying in a puddle of their own fat. (those cheap aluminum grilling screens work real good)

You can also sprinkle the bacon with brown sugar, or spritz it with liquid smoke before you cook it.

Oh yeah, slow down when the roads wet...road 120 miles once and it poured down rain for ever damn mile.....
I got my first bike 43 years ago , and have never crashed on the street....yet.....
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Paul be careful with your front brakes on wet surfaces. When I rode your bike a few weeks ago they kind of grabbed due to I think there is air in the line or something as they seem to catch. Get that fixed and I believe that you will have no worries.
I actually loosened the pivot screw and lubed it. That is where it was grabbing.

Yep...Baking bacon is the way to go. I wrinkle up the foil before I put it in the pan so the slabs aren't laying in a puddle of their own fat. (those cheap aluminum grilling screens work real good)

You can also sprinkle the bacon with brown sugar, or spritz it with liquid smoke before you cook it.

Oh yeah, slow down when the roads wet...road 120 miles once and it poured down rain for ever damn mile.....
I got my first bike 43 years ago , and have never crashed on the street....yet.....
I suddenly want some bacon for some reason. Like some sort of subliminal messaging going on here.

I plan to have the same record KM. Maybe one day.
 

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I've been in your same spot, and honestly from what i've gathered if you really want to know where that limit is go into a parking lot and start taking turns while leaning. there unfortunately is only one way to find out. however keep in mind that you can catch a spot of oil from a car ahead and still wind up dropping the bike at some pretty absurdly low speeds. When it rains i really just try to lean the bike as least as possible and go slow as possible and stay in the lane where car tires go not the center where they drip oil. I've had it get a bit squirrely on me before but I was going slow enough to handle it. I started in November and have a bit over 4 or 5k on my vulcan now, I'm just to the point of wanting to do a track day on it so i can really figure out how to get the most out of it in the dry. Maybe a wet second track day would be perfect and help me not be sooo overly cautious when it rains.
 
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