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Premium Member
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301 Posts
Thanks for this thread, would love to see it as a condensed list elsewhere. But now I definitely feel like I need to do so much more to my bike than I anticipated, but am very eager to learn.

OK, so I know many will laugh, others will probably just tell me to look elsewhere - Haven't gotten to verses yet, but I have t ask this question.

What is a lube spline? And can I undertake this myself?
 

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Premium Member
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4,054 Posts
Thanks for this thread, would love to see it as a condensed list elsewhere. But now I definitely feel like I need to do so much more to my bike than I anticipated, but am very eager to learn.

OK, so I know many will laugh, others will probably just tell me to look elsewhere - Haven't gotten to verses yet, but I have t ask this question.

What is a lube spline? And can I undertake this myself?
Nobody is laughing! We've all been there. The spline lube is in my signature. We highly recommend you do this yourself and save money, and get your feet wet with doing your own maintenance. Welcome to the group and holler if you have questions! :smiley_th
 

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Countrycuz
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11 Posts
How do you lube the rear splines?
I thought the driveshaft was full of oil.
I had a cx500 and put 44 thousand miles on it and never had to do anything to it.
there are designs on this machine that make you think it was built 40 years ago.
When they built it to resemble a Harley did they also design it so you have to work on it all the time like one?
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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5,072 Posts
How do you lube the rear splines?
I thought the driveshaft was full of oil.
I had a cx500 and put 44 thousand miles on it and never had to do anything to it.
there are designs on this machine that make you think it was built 40 years ago.When they built it to resemble a Harley did they also design it so you have to work on it all the time like one?
Close, but no cigar...lol... But guess what, I like the 80s style bikes... I think the modern bikes are the Fat Harley copies, thats the ones I don't care for...
BTW-- http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=17274 for the splines...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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7,960 Posts
Discussion Starter #65
Thanks for this thread, would love to see it as a condensed list elsewhere. But now I definitely feel like I need to do so much more to my bike than I anticipated, but am very eager to learn.
I thought Jerry`s check listfor new owners should be linked to this thread too.
http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20401&highlight=homemade+mcct

Not sure if he mentions anything new that has`t been already covered, but it is a little more "condensed" than all the tips in this thread. :smiley_th
 

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Premium Member
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3,026 Posts
1. Check and lube ALL the final drive splines.
2. replace the ACCTs with TOC MCCTs.
3. Check the entire brake system front and rear, lube cable, replace fluid, check pads and shoes, replace if necessary. Check discs for serious damage.
4. Lube and adjust throttle, clutch, and choke cables.
5. Change oil and filter. Replace the air filters with new oem filters or equivalent. Oil them properly.
6. Change final drive oil.
7. Change coolant, flush system with distilled water.
8. Check tires, replace if necessary. Inflate to correct pressure as recommended by tire manufacturer.
9. Check the charging system, make sure it is working properly. if you have an old battery that you have to put water in, replace it with a MF AGM battery.
10. Go through the maintenance chart in the owners manual, check everything not listed above. Be aware that some of the things like lubing the swingarm and steering head bearings, replacing the brake hoses, etc. based on time is just a dealer ripoff. Those things only need to be done IF you have a problem. I have ridden with 20 year old hoses with no problems. But some other things, like checking the lights and horn, are a good idea.


This assumes the bike is running right. If not, there are a whole lot of other things that may need to be done depending on the bikes condition. Bikes that have sit for a long time, especially with gas in them, will need a lot of cleaning and maintenance.
 

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Registered
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450 Posts
One more great idea,do like I did and remove those annoying bolts that hold the seat back.You know,the ones that prevent you from getting to the battery/other components??I removed them... then put a tight little bungee acroos the curved part of that back seat,hitched to the bar/frame.Never had a issue with losing my seat!!
 

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8. Wear FULL protective clothing. The coats will get warm, that's why I got one that has vent pouches in it to let some air in. Get a full faced helmet. The skull cap and even to 3/4 helmet will do more damage to your head that a full face will.

Disagree with this helmet "thought",3/4 is good.Full face feels wierd on a cruiser anyway!My 3/4 helmet...
 

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Super Moderator
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11,859 Posts
One more great idea,do like I did and remove those annoying bolts that hold the seat back.You know,the ones that prevent you from getting to the battery/other components??I removed them... then put a tight little bungee acroos the curved part of that back seat,hitched to the bar/frame.Never had a issue with losing my seat!!
Looks like a great red neck repair, but not everyone wants a bungee cord across the seat. If you have a maintainance free AGM battery there is no reason to take the seat off.
 

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Registered
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66 Posts
Or do What I did and buy a new battery, and then put a couple of wing nuts on the back so you don't need a screwdriver, just your fingers.
 

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Premium Member
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3,026 Posts
I did remove my seat bolts, 10 years ago. But I have the extended backrest, and the pad holds the seat nicely in place. I bought a new tool box lid, and no longer open it for anything.

I do wear a full face helmet, not only for protection, but because it is more comfortable. No thanks on the FULL protective clothing, I'm not the ATGATT type. I bundle up if it is cold enough. If I had to wear a full moon suit for every ride, I wouldn't ride. Many of my rides, even several hundred mile ones, are done on the spur of the moment, when the mood strikes me. If I had to go through the ritual of putting on 50 pounds of armor everytime, I'd be out of the mood before I got done. And what do you do when you decide to stop at some eating place? I'm not going in wearing a space suit. NOT putting it down, just NOT for me.
 

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Expendable newbie
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309 Posts
You know what we need now? A top ten list of the things a new owner shouldn't do to his ride. Now who wants to write that?
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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16,080 Posts
1.let exhaust cool before you make sweet love to her

2.if you ride nekid wear a condom.we must be safe

3.don't let the old lady hear you say I love you to the bike

4.don't let the old lady hear you and the bike talking on ways to get your old lady to sleep in the garage so the bike can sleep in the dining room

5.don't wear sandals(hey I can be serious once in a while)

6.leave your Sons of Anarchy cut at home

7.don't drive like my brother

8.always wear your helmet.that way no one will know how ugly ya are

9.DON'T RIDE STOOPID

10.Just because you can doesn't mean you should
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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7,960 Posts
Discussion Starter #74
Avoid custom built seats unless you can try it out first

Or do What I did and buy a new battery, and then put a couple of wing nuts on the back so you don't need a screwdriver, just your fingers.
Your seat must be different than mine if you can attach it with wing nuts, or nuts of any description. :confused:

My seat has captive nuts and is held to the bike with two bolts through the short sissy bar/seat back frame.

My original seat is quite easy to unbolt and reattach. It falls right into place with no gaps when putting back on. I have also ridden with only my throw-over saddle bags holding it on.

I have another seat that I bought from a member here, that was supposedly custom built. It is a thing of beauty with metal studs running along the sides from back to front. HOWEVER it fits poorly and requires a fair amount of effort to force the back down far enough to close the gap and get the retaining bolts installed.

The "custom builder" also modified the seat pan and made it so wide at the front that I MUST STAND UP WHEN I STOP!! I am about 5' 10" with a 30" inseam and can easily flatfoot my scoot with both feet while sitting on the original seat.

LEARN FROM MY MISTAKE AND DO NOT BUY A MODIFIED SEAT WITHOUT TRYING IT OUT FIRST. It will cost me more to get this seat returned to its original shape and fit me, than the price plus shipping paid for it in the first place. :crying:

I wish a pox on the house of the designer and builder of this abortion of a seat.

Or at least he should be forced to ride on it in stop and go traffic for a couple of 10 hour days!! >:)
 

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Registered
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21 Posts
MY TEN would be.....

1.check the oil level and change the oil soon,you don't know what oil the P.O. used or additive he put in.
2.check the air box connections and snorkles to make sure they aren't pinched or crimped and gives you a look at the filters to see if they need cleaning
3.tire pressure
4.clutch travel
5. i have found loose battery terminals,check they are real tight! get a new one, i have found ALL V Twins take a load to crank so if the batt is weak,get a new one.
6.drain the carbs.
7.check the coolant level.
8.check the spark plug caps are on good.
9.check for leaks
10.squirt some lube in the key slots and the key way on the gas cap so they work easy
11. GET FAMILIAR WITH THE KILL SWITCH IN CASE OF EMERGENCY!
 

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Thats 'Mr' Jr Member
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249 Posts
Tools and manuals are needed for some, but not the first things one needs. I had tools already and the list should not be just for newbies to motorcycles in general.

Here are the top ten suggestions for new VN 750 owners, not in any specific order:

1. MF AGM battery...really it is the first thing to buy.
2. Silcone the lock in the tool box and tape the hinge on the inside so if the plastic breaks the lid won't go MIA.
3. Silicone the swing arm covers
4. Clean all the electrical connections
5. Install a voltmeter
6. Go over the bike and check every bolt and nut for proper torque
7. Buy a GOOD tire pressure guage and use it.
8. Check the adjustment of all the controls (brakes, clutch)
9. Take the MSF rider course
10. Buy a GOOD full face helmet and proper riding gear.
11. Relocate the R/R

I may have left out something, but it is early....I made the R/R the 11th item because I still maintain that it is not necessarily needed

Hi Knifemaker, I agree completely with your list, though I would have to disagree with where you say that relocating the R&R may not be necessary.
I recently did mine and from the appearance of the connecting plug, there is clearly a heat issue with the original location and from the results of putting a used R&R in the new location, I now know that the original was not functioning properly.

 

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Super Moderator
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11,859 Posts
Hi Knifemaker, I agree completely with your list, though I would have to disagree with where you say that relocating the R&R may not be necessary.
I recently did mine and from the appearance of the connecting plug, there is clearly a heat issue with the original location and from the results of putting a used R&R in the new location, I now know that the original was not functioning properly.

Sorry it took 3 years to respond here. I did say “Not necessarily” as in “might not”
I see you live in Florida. Gets hot there I would guess. ;) not sure if you have periodically been cleaning your electrical contacts (a good idea especially if you live near the ocean) So I can’t say for sure if your issue was do solely to the R\R’s placement.
I know up in St. Louis it took a hot day and being stuck in bumper to bumper crawling traffic to see symptoms of an overheating R\R.
I’m sure if I had to replace mine I would have relocated it however ;)
 
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