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Hey thanks for doing this Hoss. I think I mentioned earlier that I would put it together but I see its in capable hands. I used to be an editor and will edit the final draft if you think it will be helpful.

Also, maybe a section titled something like "General Safety" would be helpful? Or maybe "Things Newbie's Should Watch Out For" or something? The only problem I see there would be cutting it down so its not 50 million pages. Anway, I see that MSF is mentioned but maybe this area could include certain things to watch out for as a newbie. For example, I was extremely anxious to get back on the bike on the first tolerable day of Winter. I read here that I should watch out for salt (calcium) deposits that may be left in the road from the salt trucks. I'm very glad to have read it, I believe it saved me from my first spill. Just a thought...
 

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Did anyone ever get around to editing this up for a sticky a lot of good ideas in here. Makes it seem like I will be working on my bike for months before its safe to ride though, lol.
 

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Did anyone ever get around to editing this up for a sticky a lot of good ideas in here. Makes it seem like I will be working on my bike for months before its safe to ride though, lol.
Once I get a draft from Hoss I'd be happy to take a look at it. I think he may be waiting until there are no more responses here so he's sure he collected all the data...
 

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Don't go to the DARK SIDE - GO to the LIGHT and wear visible riding gear. There are fashionable riding jackets with armor that include reflective stripes and or are HiVis.

Get a more comfy seat for those long hauls.

DT
I definately agree here - i wound up behind Daniel coming home late one night and my headlights lit up his jacket like it had light bulbs those retro reflective strips on the jackets make all the difference
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
bumping back to the top.
LP and others wondering where the revised writeup is. I am still working on it.
What I want to do in the meantime is create a link to this thread in my signature, but I do not know how.
Can anyone help me. I find trying to learn how to do stuff on this computer very frustrating.
 

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Hey Hoss,

Highlighting the address in the address bar (http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread...), then cutting and pasting into you sig should work. Just hightlight the address to this thread (above) press Ctrl + C (or right click and choose "cut), then go to "edit signature" and while editing hit Ctrl + V (or right click and choose "paste". The site should automatically make the link active after you save your signature...
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #47 (Edited)
I finally got it LP. I have been back and forth half a dozen times, and have revised or erased this post with each update.

I`m typing this out on Corel WordPerfect, but have no idea how to send it to you. Shoot me a PM with instructions, and I`ll try to send what I have in the first draft.
 

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Something that may be mentioned on one of the pages here that a newbie probably ought to start practicing is turning off the bike with the key. My son is probably going to buy my 750 and he came over to take it for a ride Monday and when he pulled up the driveway he was fumbling with the right controls, and nearly touched the starter button before I stopped him and said "use the key". Its a great habit to get into for more than one reason. Mainly IMO it causes you to handle the key, which should remind you to remove it and put it in your pocket, and if you turn the bike off by the key, your lights won't be left on. That little battery will run down pretty quick if you leave your lights on as someone on the forum just recently found out. They taught in the MSF to use the kill switch and I did that for quite a while when I first started riding, but I've left my key in the bike a couple times with the ignition on, once at a bike rally no less, and it's pretty embarrassing and stupid, and could have been hard to explain to my insurance company! Unfortunately, my 1500's key is on the side of the engine in front of my "left" leg, so I would have to put the bike in neutral and use my left hand to turn it off. And I have left the lights on a couple times already on it but luckily for just a minute or two... If I were paying attention, my temp and oil lights will come on RED if I leave the key on... Just a suggestion!
 

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EXCELLENT point. I have, unfortunately on more than one occasion, accidentally walked off and left my key in the ignition (clearly, I'd either not had enough coffee or have a newly-discovered learning disability). In any event, turning it off with the key and immediately pulling it seems to have cured me.

--FA
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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OK, so on Monday I started typing out the intro and outline of this little project on Corels Word Perfect. I had that much done on two pages and then tried to save it. I should have had a 12 year old computer tutor here supervising me, because I lost the whole dang works! To some one who is a skilled keyboardist, two pages can be cranked out in 5 minutes I suppose. For a two finger hunt and peck writer like I am, it represents a few hours of work.

I was so discouraged that I haven`t even looked at my hand written notes, to start again, all this week. I`m out of my self imposed funk now, and will learn how to save to hard drive, one sentence, before I expend any more time and effort on TEN THINGS. That means that I will be taking up your offer, Liberty Pilot, to do some editing for me. Naturally it is now prime riding weather. Of course in FL, it`s always riding weather, so I`ll just have to hope that it is so hot outside that you would rather sit inside a nice cool a/c house for a while and try to make a silk purse out of a sow`s ear. LOL
 

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Something that may be mentioned on one of the pages here that a newbie probably ought to start practicing is turning off the bike with the key. My son is probably going to buy my 750 and he came over to take it for a ride Monday and when he pulled up the driveway he was fumbling with the right controls, and nearly touched the starter button before I stopped him and said "use the key". Its a great habit to get into for more than one reason. Mainly IMO it causes you to handle the key, which should remind you to remove it and put it in your pocket, and if you turn the bike off by the key, your lights won't be left on. That little battery will run down pretty quick if you leave your lights on as someone on the forum just recently found out. They taught in the MSF to use the kill switch and I did that for quite a while when I first started riding, but I've left my key in the bike a couple times with the ignition on, once at a bike rally no less, and it's pretty embarrassing and stupid, and could have been hard to explain to my insurance company! Unfortunately, my 1500's key is on the side of the engine in front of my "left" leg, so I would have to put the bike in neutral and use my left hand to turn it off. And I have left the lights on a couple times already on it but luckily for just a minute or two... If I were paying attention, my temp and oil lights will come on RED if I leave the key on... Just a suggestion!
In the MSF class they teach proper proceedures for turning off the bike...It is KGK...Kill switch, Gas, Key...If you always do this...then you will never forget your key, and you will always cover all the bases.
 

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I thought I'd put up a quick list of things in the "ergonomic" mods category, especially for people who will be taking longer rides.

1) Replace or shave the stock seat to eliminate pressure points caused by seams and buttons. (At minimum, "shave" by un-stapling the seat cover, removing the buttons, smoothing the foam away from the "edge" of the seat (under your thighs) to more evenly spread your weight, covering with $10 worth of marine grade vinyl.)

2) For seat cooling and cushioning, you can also consider a beaded seat cover, sheepskin, allmart auto cushion, or AirHawk cushion. This might eliminate some of the stock seat problems as well.

3) Rotate your handlebars toward or away from you so your arms are in the most "neutral" (i.e., personally comfortable) position you can find for both height and stretch. There's not much play, but if your arms are longer or shorter than most, even an inch or so helps.

4) Consider a backrest. Some solutions include: walmart cooler (doubles as a third saddlebag, auto head-rest afixed to the seatpan, or the specifically made ProTek/Tack? backrest.

5) Replace the footpegs with floorboards. Search the site for "Chad" or "Knifemaker" on this. I used their designs to made my own out of cut-down wheelchair foot pieces from a thrift store, covered with heavy duty auto mats found at a junkyard.

6) Replace the grips and/or use bar ends to lessen vibration. Everyone seems to love IsoGrips, but there are also plenty of serviceable 7/8 grips on the market, gel, foam, and rubber.

7) Get or mod a "throttle rocker" - basically a nub on the grip which allows you to apply downward pressure with your palm, eliminating hand fatigue due to constantly clenching the grips on long rides.

8) Get a windscreen/fairing. At the very least, something that reduces the wind buffeting you in the chest. As with all these other ideas, there are lots of threads here on the topic.
 
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First, I may have missed it but... I dont see one of the most important things you can do as a new rider... MOTORCYCLE SAFETY COURSE. I am 32, and was forced to take it at 17 by a Texas law requiring it to get ur endorsement if ur under 18. IT WILL SAVE YOUR LIFE. You do not realize how much you DONT know until you know it. My boss just took it a couple months ago, after riding for years and was amazed what he had learned from it, and now considers himself a novice, when he had considered himself experienced before.

If you doubt me, answer this one, extremely simple question....
At speed, if you want to lean/veer right, which way do you turn the handlebars? If you didnt say 'left', there's a whole lot you need to learn. If you dont believe, get up, go get on your bike and try it out BEFORE you post a reply about how stupid I am. ;-)

Second, Protective equipment is nice, but come on. When I wear a helmet, it's a 3/4 with full shield because you can raise the shield a click or two and get some air. Now I dont believe in stupidity such as riding in flip flops or anything rediculous like that, but what's the point of being 'in the wind' if you have to be dressed in kevlar like a SWAT pointman? If you're that scared of some road rash, maybe motorcycling isnt for you. And if you think heat is an 'inconvenience', you've never been on a bike, in Houston, at 4pm, in July, with both feet down on 150 degree blacktop cuz traffic is stopped. Besides, if you take the MSC, and learn to stay VERTICAL, you have little need for excessive protective equipment.

My MSC instructor once said, 90% of car/MC accidents are the car driver's fault. However, 90% of those accidents could have been avoided by the motorcyclist if he had been paying better attention and been riding defensively.
 

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first, i may have missed it but... I dont see one of the most important things you can do as a new rider... Motorcycle safety course.......

......my msc instructor once said, 90% of car/mc accidents are the car driver's fault. However, 90% of those accidents could have been avoided by the motorcyclist if he had been paying better attention and been riding defensively.
x2!!
 

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First, I may have missed it but... I dont see one of the most important things you can do as a new rider... MOTORCYCLE SAFETY COURSE.

Many here strongly endorse taking the MSF course. But the topic of the thread is "TOP TEN itemes you would suggest a new owner do to his new ride". So the focus of this thread is on the ride, not the rider.

If you doubt me, answer this one, extremely simple question....
At speed, if you want to lean/veer right, which way do you turn the handlebars? If you didnt say 'left', there's a whole lot you need to learn. If you dont believe, get up, go get on your bike and try it out BEFORE you post a reply about how stupid I am. ;-)

Personally, I believe if you have to think about counter steering, you shouldn't be on a motorized bike. Go back to the pedal type until it's second nature. And yes, I have to think about which way to steer when you ask the question, but not when I'm on the bike. And that's what's important

Second, Protective equipment is nice, but come on. When I wear a helmet, it's a 3/4 with full shield because you can raise the shield a click or two and get some air. Now I dont believe in stupidity such as riding in flip flops or anything rediculous like that, but what's the point of being 'in the wind' if you have to be dressed in kevlar like a SWAT pointman? If you're that scared of some road rash, maybe motorcycling isnt for you. And if you think heat is an 'inconvenience', you've never been on a bike, in Houston, at 4pm, in July, with both feet down on 150 degree blacktop cuz traffic is stopped. Besides, if you take the MSC, and learn to stay VERTICAL, you have little need for excessive protective equipment.

Protective equipment is a matter of personal choice. This time of year, I wear a FF with mesh jacket and pants, boots and gloves. A month ago I rode by a bank that indicated the temperature was 105. Was I hot riding in town? Yes. Did I stuff some of the gear in the saddlebags? No. Personal choice. Are NE Louisiana summers cooler and less humid than other locations in the SE? Not in my experience. I'd rather sweat at slow speeds with gear than have road rash anywhere on my body. Am I a chicken? Guess so. And I don't put both feet down at an intersection. Learned that in the MSF BRC.

My MSC instructor once said, 90% of car/MC accidents are the car driver's fault. However, 90% of those accidents could have been avoided by the motorcyclist if he had been paying better attention and been riding defensively.
I agree with your instructor.
 

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This thread has been dead for a couple of months, and I just now read it. I'm BRAND NEW to bikes myself, but I have learned a few things during my time with the bike. This is going to be a list of things a new rider should do, should know about the bike, Ways to be safe, and possibly a few other things.

1. Take the Motorcycle Safety Course. I know this has been said many times in this thread, but it's great advice. I will be taking that course at the end of this month beginning of next month. That will give me the basic starting knowledge on safely riding my bike.

2. don't get on your bike just to look cool. It seems that people that get crouch rockets get those to look cool. All the motorcycle accidents I've responded to EXCEPT 1 was a crouch rocket. Remember when you are on that bike it is your best friend.

3. With your bike being your best friend learn and know all the major parts of your bike. Check that air pressure, make sure it has no loose bolts/nuts, top off that fluid, and change it when it needs to be changed. Check those lights,

I didn't see this one mentioned, but check the fork seals make sure they aren't broke or anything so your forks will function correctly.

4. Get that repair book and read it. If you don't understand something ask a question on this forum.

5. It has been said on here more than a few times, but I feel the need to say it myself. If it has 4 or more wheels on it then you better bet it's out there to get you. NEVER second guess that; have it locked in your head that 4+ wheels are out to get you so you are always on the look out incase something does happen.

6. The bike has 2 wheels. These aren't dirt bikes. Keep those 2 wheels on the pavement.

7. If your new to the bike world don't go out and spend hundreds of dollars to make your bike look all spiffy. Learn how to handle your bike before you put all that money into the extras that aren't needed for it.

8. Wear FULL protective clothing. The coats will get warm, that's why I got one that has vent pouches in it to let some air in. Get a full faced helmet. The skull cap and even to 3/4 helmet will do more damage to your head that a full face will.

9. Know your roads. Don't go 70mph down a road then at the last minute you realize it turns into graves. By the time you go to slow down you could be in the hospital.

10. Check the bike over for any damage. When I got my bike the tank had a nice sized dent in it. Well since I had to repair that spot it got me to look over the WHOLE tank, and to my surprise part of the tank was actually broke in an undamaged area. That spot had to be welded so gas didn't leak out.

11. SHOW RESPECT TO OTHERS WHEN YOUR ON YOUR BIKE. It is easier for a larger motorized vehicle to take you out than it is for you to take them out.

12. I personally think you should do a pre-trip AND a post-trip inspection. While you were out something could have gone wrong with the bike and that post trip you may have been able to spot it. Each inspection should only take 5-10 minutes.

13. If you are new to the bike world don't get to comfy and lose your train of thought. When you get to comfortable is when something may happen.

14. If you are NEW to the biking world you don't know everything so don't act like it.

15. JUST BE SAFE

I know some of these things have already been mentioned, but there was a couple things I wanted to throw in there from how I feel about this thread/topic on safety and everything. I know I'm brand new to the street bike world. I've owned dirt bikes in the past, but this is a completely new world to me. These ideas ran through my head while I was reading this thread, and they are ALL great ideas that everyone has.
 

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This thread has been dead for a couple of months, and I just now read it. I'm BRAND NEW to bikes myself, but I have learned a few things during my time with the bike. This is going to be a list of things a new rider should do, should know about the bike, Ways to be safe, and possibly a few other things......
All real good..even the ones repeated. Guess we now have to retitle this thread the "Top 15 items..." ... ;)

KM
 

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Into the Darkness
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All real good..even the ones repeated. Guess we now have to retitle this thread the "Top 15 items..." ... ;)

KM
lol I just had a lot of things going through my head when I did this post. It was just all from my perspective on things since I'm new to the biking world, and what I feel is important. A lot of it can even go for experienced riders and beginners.
 

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Thanks for all the useful ideas and to wkrizan for the Service Manual.
 
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