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Discussion Starter #1
The yahoo group/forum favorite is without a doubt the Metzeler ME880. I have 'em and love 'em. For a great price try: www.ronayers.com

The "best bang for the buck" tire is the Dunlop D404. I recently put a set on my buddies Yam V-Star 1100 and really like the handling/stability. I probably would have bought these had they been available in our sizes last year. The best price I've seen on these is from:
www.discountmotorcycletire.com
 

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Re: Tires-rotational direction

wonder if the dunlop oem tire is a big deal if the front is on backwards, the tread on these seems backwards when on correct, but mine is on backwards according to rotational arrow. been on for a few thousand miles, would it hurt the tire to turn it around? or should I just let it be.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Beavis,

I don't know if belt strength/integrity would be harmed by reversing the direction. A problem I can think off would be evacuating water. If it's an old rib design then it's probably no big deal. If it's a more modern tread block design then it going to "pump" water out if installed correctly or possibly hydro plane if on backwards. I would shoot-off an e-mail to Dunlop to find out.
You can get a new Dunlop D404 (100/90-19) for $45 + shipping from: www.discountmotorcycletire.com
 

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Rotational arrow is because of the way the tire is constructed. Is has to do with the way that they overlap the tread rubber. Under hard braking for the front, over time the overlap can separate. Put it the right way as soon as you can.
 

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I Did turn it around correct. dont know why I dreaded it, was piece of cake. but I cheated, i took off the wheel and took it to tire dealer, they charged me a whopping 5.00 to dismount and remount, best 5 i spent all week.
thanks for the advise

also glad I did, there was a missing axle retainer bolt! if the nut got loose, it would be hard to drive with no front wheel, even though ive seen it done, dont think I would be very good at it LOL.

beavis
 

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jaredv750 said:
what are the recommended tire pressures front and rear for the Metz ME880's ?
Fr=36psi
Rr=40psi
...according to the Metz fitment guide. I run those pressures, and my last set lasted me 21,000mi.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I too run Metz recommended 36psi front and 40 rear. I have 5K on mine and they look new. Though I still like the Dunlop 404 because it's such a great value. I put a set on my buddies V-Star 1100 and they're great! They weren't made in the VN750 sizes back when I bought my Metz.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wow, from www.ronayers.com - The Dunlop D404 front is now $39.88 and the rear is $61.71! Total, with shipping, to your front door = $113.59!!!
 

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hey bruce ; ordered the dunlops for my 2001 from ronayers, great web site,was wondering if there is a tried and true method for balancing .i plan on mounting the new 404's myself.do the stick on weights work out well? what would a dealer charge to balance them? ken in penfield,ny.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I don't know the best method for balancing. I bring my wheels to a guy who has a very nice electronic Snap-On brand balancer that does a static and dynamic balance - it works very well and he's cheap $15/wheel (for mount & balance). He does use stick on weights where applicable and they've been holding fine on my Bikes for yrs now. You might want to ask around at your local bike night about someone in your area that does balancing or maybe find some local racers - they always seem to know. I have no idea what a dealer charges just for balance but how much could it be? Here in the Detroit area the average price for a mount AND balance (wheels off the bike) is $43/tire - ouch!
 

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Putting another set of Avon tires on my 95 model. I got 20,000 miles out of the first set that I put on it, so I'm going with them again. I just really like the tires. Bear (my wife) got 19,000 out of a set of Avons on her Suzuki Marauder this past set, and we're going to put another set on hers too. She didn't get half that much with Dunlops. My son just switched to Avons on his Softail, and really likes them so far compared to the Dunlops he used to run. I've got to say though, I got over 20,000 miles out of a set of Bridgestone tires that had run 11,000 on my 03 model (they came on it), and 9,500 on my 95 model. They still have a little life in them, but not much. I'm going to put them on my 90 project bike (bar-hop bobber) that I hope to get on the road this winter, to finish them off. (Read: Burnouts, whenever I get a chance.)

I mount and balance my own tires on both bikes. Both procedures are pretty primitive, but they work. There are photos at:
http://www.cdthayer.com/cruisermaint_5.htm#750_Tire

Being out in the "sticks" with no bike shops for miles helps justify the need for primitive. I even carry a tire iron on my VN750 (which-ever one I have running at the time) to do tire mounting on the road-side if I ever need to do so. Hopefully, I won't ever have to use it, but, why leave home without it?
I haven't ever tried the Metzeler 880, but I still vote for the Avon Venom-X.
 

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primitive, hmm, looks high tech compared to how i break beads, i sandwich
the tire between the bottom of my trailer and a miniature floor jack and
that usually does the trick, as it breaks just before the trailer lifts up..



btw, where are you guys getting the 40 psi for the rear tire? i looked in the fitment guide and converted teh bar readings to psi and it came to something like 32....so where is the 40 listed? link to guide and page number is appreciated.
 

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Beavis,

Your way sounds like it will work just fine.

I usually break the bead on my VN750 front tire by using a small bench vise. The tire is narrow enough to fit between the jaws for the squeeze. The only problem is, sometimes I can't get the second bead to break that way, and have to use the lever method to finish the job.



I run 32 psi in my rear tire, even when I have my bike fully loaded with camping gear. My tires seem to wear fine with that pressure year-around.

CD in Frederick, OK
 

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beavis said:
btw, where are you guys getting the 40 psi for the rear tire? i looked in the fitment guide and converted teh bar readings to psi and it came to something like 32....so where is the 40 listed? link to guide and page number is appreciated.

Can't help here...you have to go to their website and go to the fitmit page...which is being redone...they have a link to a PDF file of their 2005 catalog...you can download that and then go to page 21 or so and look up the VN 750 under Kawasaki..
Anyway ..it quite CLEARLY says 36 front 40 rear for the 880's and it is PSI ..
Hey, would I lie to you?

KM
 

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beavis said:
primitive, hmm, looks high tech compared to how i break beads, i sandwich
the tire between the bottom of my trailer and a miniature floor jack and
that usually does the trick, as it breaks just before the trailer lifts up..



btw, where are you guys getting the 40 psi for the rear tire? i looked in the fitment guide and converted teh bar readings to psi and it came to something like 32....so where is the 40 listed? link to guide and page number is appreciated.
Do different tires require different pressures? The VN750 service manual page 9-3 says that the front tire pressure should be 28 psi. and the rear pressure with a load under 215 lb. should also be 28 psi. or 32 psi. with a load over 215 lbs. The manual specifically mentions Dunlop and Metzeler tires.
 

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Normally, the tire manufacturers are pretty close to the same recommended inflation value for each tire size, but not always. The vehicle manufacturer will give a specific inflation value for the tire brand(s) it intends to send out on the new vehicle.

The answer to your question is "yes", the correct inflation value is decided by the tire manufacturer, and can vary from application to application. A good example, is putting floatation tires on trucks or equipment, instead of the standard tires that comes on it out of the factory. Each type of tire is designed to operate best at a specific inflation value depending on the application. Usually though, all that the tire manufacturer gives you along with the tire, is the maximum inflation value or limit. You have to research what inflation value is recommended by the "after market" tire manufacturer for your specific application.


CD in Frederick, OK
 

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Discussion Starter #19
36 PSI front and 40 PSI rear will add treadlife to your tires over what Kaw states in the owners manual. And yes, those are the figures Metzeler is recommending.
 
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