Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Leave your battery connected when working on the wiring.
You too can practically catch your bike on fire.

I have a 6in1 Temp, Voltage, Clock Stopwatch, etc. Meter. The wires coming off it are pretty weak. It got caught in my dash and some of the wires had gotten exposed. So the other day I decided to put in a plug so I could remove it, and at the same time put in beefier wires at least coming from the unit itself. I was pulling power from the headlight and had left all the excess wire from the 6/1 unit all bundled up in the headlight.
Rather than reconnect the new wire in the headlight, I just was going to solder the new wire to the old wire.
I started doing this and was working on the third wire to solder when all of a sudden smoke starts coming from my headlight. I thought damn, must of left the soldering iron on something and it is burning. But I look down at my hand where I am holding the soldering iron and it isn't touching anything. Then it dawned on me, the postive and negative wires had crossed. I hadn't taped them up yet. I quickly seperated them and then removed the ground connector from the battery.
Opened up the headlight to assess the damage and found the bundle of wire all melted together. Fortunately, nothing else was damaged and I think the wiring that I replaced it with was better quality anyway.
Just thought I would share my exciting tale of almost burning up my bike.

Always, always, always disconnect your ground terminal from your battery before working on the wiring of your bike.

Don't be like Mike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Good tip there. I've had that happen to me before. The worst time was with a 1932 Chevy fire truck. I drove it to a parade and everything worked just fine. I then went to the picnic and afterwards went out to go back home, after dark. The truck started but there were no head lights. I reached under the dash into a 50 year buildup of wires and finally got the lights to work. The trip back to the fire hall was about 20 miles. As I pulled into the driveway the lights went out again. I reached under the dash and nearly burned my hands on the wires. I ended up finding a completly new wiring harness and rewired the entire truck with my brother.
 

·
Forum Faciliator
Joined
·
369 Posts
Watch the extra connectors in the head light bucket

Watch the extra connectors in the head light bucket. They are always hot (powered)

RB
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top