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Discussion Starter #1
I make it a constant habit when riding to keep my situational awareness at 110% - when I approach an intersection, I do so with a plan on how to escape with my life should idiots occur...and they WILL occur.

This poor lady learned the hard way; I'm seriously thinking about adding a headlight modulator in addition to my "weave" routine.

http://www.13wmaz.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=98467&catid=153

A motorcyclist has died after an accident on Watson Boulevard in Warner Robins.

Officers of the Warner Robins Police Department responded to an automobile accident Monday at 5:41 p.m. at the intersection of Watson Boulevard and Austin Avenue.

Police say 39 year-old Sheri Lee St. Louis of Perry was driving a 2004 Gold Chevrolet Silverado Truck eastbound on Watson Blvd. and had just entered the turning lane to turn into the Budget Inn located at 2076 Watson Blvd.

Valerie Gay Whitaker, age 41, of Warner Robins was driving a 2006 Black Harley Davidson Motorcycle and also traveling westbound on Watson Blvd.

Police say in the same lane of travel as Whitaker's motorcycle was Mitchell Ryan Fowler age 18 of Warner Robins driving a 1996 Red Chevrolet C1500 Truck.

St. Louis attempted to make a left turn and pulled into the path of Mrs. Whitaker's motorcycle causing an accident, police said.

After the impact, police say Whitaker was ejected from the motorcycle.

Authorities said Fowler tried to steer left after the first crash but was unable to avoid colliding with Mrs. Whitaker and her motorcycle which caused another car accident.

Whitaker received severe impact trauma and was transported to the Houston Medical Center for treatment, according to police.

At about 6:41 a.m. police say Whitaker died. Ms. StLouis and Mr. Fowler were not injured, according to police.

This car accident is being investigated by the Warner Robins Police Department.
 

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MANIC MECHANIC
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People are only interested in what they are doing you should try riding up here in D.C. metro traffic I tapped on the window of a cager the other driver to ask him to please put down the book he was reading on the steering wheel and pay attention (his 2 left tires were in my lane). To which he replied "[email protected] off, you have plenty of room." A morning radio dj in Baltimore I was listening to came right out and said he did not and would not pay extra attention to look for motorcycles. and went on to say if you were on a motorcycle in traffic that was your risk not his problem. My friends, they are out there to kill us.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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That`s the classic left turn killer move that should not be a surprise to any of us while riding. Expect them to turn in front of you! Watch for the tires to turn left before the car/truck moves, and for the hood to rise as they accelerate and start to move. That gives you another fraction of a second warning over just seeing the car body moving into your lane.

You should be scanning 12 seconds ahead for road traps, large vehicles and left turners etc. to stay away from. When approaching any situation that you have identified as possible danger, scrub off 10 mph NOW and keep the brake(s) covered. By doing so you can cut your stopping distance almost in half at typical urban speeds. Also change lanes or lane position to maximize your space cushion.

There is no information about what evasive action Mrs. Whitaker did or did not take. In the worst case scenario she did not recognize any impending danger and took no defensive measures, and drove into the truck without braking at all.

IF she had scrubbed off 10 mph as soon as she saw the truck in the left turning lane, she likely would have avoided the collision altogether. The truck behind her would have had earlier brake light warning to slow as well.

This accident is a terrible tragedy.

Avoid it happening to you by reading David Hough`s book, "Proficient Motorcycling", and safety tips here:
http://www.msgroup.org/
 

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Senior Member
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I read one in our paper tonight that the guy got killed. It said he struck the bumper of the car that pulled out in front of him instead of saying the guy hit him. I know it's just a play on words, but I really notice how they write these articles now that I'm riding again.
 

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No difference in Mexico either. Stupid cagers keep driving in my lane, as soon as they see me on the bike they pull into my lane or try to go around me at stops... as if they could go faster than me haha. I especially hate cab drivers cause they pull up wayyyy to close to me... even an imperfection of the road (and there are way too many) could make my bike go a few inches to the side and I'll hit the cab.

Still, the best thing to do is assume they WANT to hit you and just evade them. Or like a friend told me before I started riding... "when you're on a bike you have to assume that you are completely invisible!".
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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For what it's worth: your "visual footprint" goes up significantly when you ride using a headlamp modulator.

I think that many people instinctively associate a "flashing" light somehow with law enforcement, and their behavior is then more respectful--until they realize the bike in question is not a cop bike.

Although a modulator doesn't guarantee that others will always see and respect you, I find that it's very cheap life insurance. And most of the time, they do in fact work as advertised.

There are certain "rules" of etiquette that need to be employed when a modulator is used, however (e.g., turn it off when behind someone else while stopped at a traffic light).

The bottom line: modulators are basically a "no brainer". I would encourage everyone in the US to get one for their bike, and use it whenever traffic conditions can justify it.
 

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Undercover Sportbiker
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You know, last week it struck me that I was having more close calls than I've had in a loooong time. So I got to htinking about what I was doing different, other than riding at a more "sedate" pace than usual. Then, Wednesday night, I needed to take my bike up the street for a quick test ride and it had gotten dark. As I turned around in my driveway, I realized I had no headlight. The high beam indicator was on, but no light. Swap to low beam and there was light. I always ride with the high beam on during the day, and haven't done any night riding in a long time, so who knows how long it had been burned out. In doing my check of all lights I found out my tail light (run, not brake) was also toast. It was a good reminder that there's more to maintaining the bike than bolts and fluid changes. I cannot recall the last time I checked every single light prior to that. I'm glad I didn't have to pay for the mistake with my health or my life.
 

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Premium Member
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I dig the modulator. I still think we should be allowed to choke the cagers a little and maybe smack them around if they endanger our lives. Maybe have a quick kangaroo court on scene with a couple witnesses and commence to choking. I think it would help them remember how to drive like they are supposed to. Until that happens, i assume that they are complete idiots and that i am invisible. Also, X2 on Hough's book...it rocks.
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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BTW: for those who simply can't bring themselves to install a headlamp modulator on their bike, now might be a great time to repost the following video.

This YouTube video does a really great job explaining another technique for bikers to defend against last-second right of way violations:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqQBubilSXU

But I think that the modulator is really much easier to use than that illustrated above. Also: modulators are in fact legal in all US 50 states. The video was created because apparently modulators are not legal in Europe.

Either way....choose your weapon.
 

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Daily rider
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You know, last week it struck me that I was having more close calls than I've had in a loooong time. So I got to htinking about what I was doing different, other than riding at a more "sedate" pace than usual. Then, Wednesday night, I needed to take my bike up the street for a quick test ride and it had gotten dark. As I turned around in my driveway, I realized I had no headlight. The high beam indicator was on, but no light. Swap to low beam and there was light. I always ride with the high beam on during the day, and haven't done any night riding in a long time, so who knows how long it had been burned out. In doing my check of all lights I found out my tail light (run, not brake) was also toast. It was a good reminder that there's more to maintaining the bike than bolts and fluid changes. I cannot recall the last time I checked every single light prior to that. I'm glad I didn't have to pay for the mistake with my health or my life.
In the old days, when you had to physically switch the headlight on, we used to put our hand in front of the headlight to check it was on. Now, with the longer cruisers and such I've sort of gotten out of the habit. Guess I should get back to it. Some old habits are good to keep. Although, even with my long arms, it's quite a stretch to reach around the windshield and get the hand out in front of the headlight.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've heard second hand from a coworker that the lady in question was a fairly new rider. Damned shame.

Does bring to mind though that a LOT of riders, at least locally, seem to ride almost as idiotically as the cagers around them drive. I see guys (and gals) on bikes riding people's asses, weaving dangerously, and in general taking unnecessary risks on their wheels. I do wish they'd take the threat to their lives a hell of a lot more seriously. I've talked to a few and found them to be relatively new riders in almost every case, none of whom had ever taken a safety course.

Again, damned shame.
 

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Big Dumb Viking
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Friend of mine who also rides has told me of times where, here in Atlanta, he's kicked in the door of a cager who decided they wanted his lane...while he was in it. He was RIGHT beside them...and they didn't even bother to look... Driver got a huge surprise when my friend kicked a huge dent in their driver's side door. ;-)
 

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What you ride & wear is/may be a factor a well.

When I started riding I didn't really want to wear all the Hi Viz material so I bought a bright yellow full helmet.

After awhile I started doing some research and read that White and Silver are very highly visible on he road. It's interesting that with a dark road underneath us. We ride black bikes and wear black boots, pants, jackets etc. I know it's cool, but so is staying alive. I ride a white Burgman 400 and as soon as I can, my 750 will be white or silver...even if it is massively cool decals.
 

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Super Moderator
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The bottom line: modulators are basically a "no brainer". I would encourage everyone in the US to get one for their bike, and use it whenever traffic conditions can justify it.
Not sure if I would call them a "no brainer" ... a helmet is a no brainer...but the only reason I say this, is because I watched a lady turn right...directly into the path of an oncoming ambulance.......which not only had is siren going, but a pretty impressive array of flashing lights.

If a driver is not paying attention, it is likely that short of tossing a dead steer on top of their hood you might not get their attention with a pulsing light or lights.

Am sure a headlight modulator can help , but I'm not 100% convinced they would make a difference for me.


KM
 

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Daily rider
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If a driver is not paying attention, it is likely that short of tossing a dead steer on top of their hood you might not get their attention with a pulsing light or lights.KM
Something I said when car companies came out with daytime running lights was that once people get used to seeing the headlights on all the time, what will they not see next? As KM said, if the person isn't paying attention, nothing short of a 2x4 or (steer) will get their attention.
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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I'm not sure that comparisons of modulators with emergency vehicles are really fair anyway....as EMV flash rates are much slower, and are aimed very differently from that of headlamp modulators.

The "no brainer" comment above was merely a reference to the idea that a rapidly-strobing head light obviously attracts far more attention than one that is merely steady on. The idea here is (in part, at least) to help the motorcyclist stand out from an ocean of surrounding daytime running lights.

Whether one rides with or without using this advantage is of course an individual choice.

Put another way--if a modulator does save your bacon only 8 times out of 10 when faced with a clueless left turner, then of course it's still easily worth its one-time investment....:)
 

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Prowling Tiger
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The ignorance found in a lot of drivers can be found off the road as well. Next time you go shopping, watch how other people walk around the store. They are all over the place! I walk like I am driving. Others, noooooo, they walk where they want w/o regard. Instead of coming at me to my left, they would rather force me left and they go right. Pisses me right off! Those folks using shopping carts are worse. They'll whip out of an isle w/o even looking out for other people.

If people cannot do the simplest things, like walking like your supposed to drive, what makes them think they can manage the road?

Just my 2 cents.

Be safe!
 

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sad to say that the exact same thing happened in my neck of the woods last week. A car makes a left turn on a busy 4 lane road and the poor guy on the bike never had a chance to react..... was thrown from the bike and killed. The driver of the car claims he never saw the motorcycle.

I had a woman refuse to let me merge into a lane (2 lanes down to one) during heavy traffic the other day. She kept trying to push me out of the lane to the point that she even brushed my leg with her bumper....nobody was moving!!

You had better be very aware of your surroundings, but even then the unexpected can happen.
 

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gun slinger
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Friend of mine who also rides has told me of times where, here in Atlanta, he's kicked in the door of a cager who decided they wanted his lane...while he was in it. He was RIGHT beside them...and they didn't even bother to look... Driver got a huge surprise when my friend kicked a huge dent in their driver's side door. ;-)
replay to a 2 year thread


i have only read about that opps better change the sig :beerchug:
 
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