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Discussion Starter #1
The most ignored component on your bike, but it shouldn’t be because just like any rubber drive shaft coupling in a vehicle, The rubber vibration dampener on your rear wheel will make or break your happiness very quickly and most people don’t even know it’s there. It’s not too big of a deal to grab it and pull it out and inspect it everyone should be doing that at the start of the season
 

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Once every tire change/spline lube should be plenty.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It’ll depend on your environment. I wouldn’t expect there to be an issue in MO, but in texas, qsome areas of Cali, maybe florida? Super hot dry climate will cause higher Operating temps. Not that you won’t see it everywhere else, just the likelyhood is higher. All factors involved as usual. This one is my spare so i was just peeking in.
 

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They are just basically a way for the force from the final drive to get transferred to the wheel itself without involving a metal to metal contact...which would wear and require lubrication. I doubt there's any real "dampening" going on here.
It's like wearing shoes, saves wear on your feet ;)
 

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It's needed to take the shock out of accel/decel. Without it, that hub would sloppy in no time, aluminum shavings all over it. Intead of going klacka-klacka all the time, the rubber takes the beating and bounces back.
 

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They use the same system on chain drive bikes also. It's actually a pretty intelligent way to make the Drive unit removable from the hub of the actual wheel. The force from the chain (or shaft) gets spread over a large surface area.
Think of just bolting a sprocket to the center hub on a bike with a bunch of power. That sprocket would then depend on the strength of the bolts holding the sprocket to the wheel. Crack the throttle wide open on a 200 hp bike and those bolts could shear instantly. Giving that sudden force a bit of cushion, and spreading out over a larger area would be a good idea. ;)
 
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