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Rider on the Storm
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1,287 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am riding from SW Ohio to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I stop in Cadillac, MI to rinse off my bike (I had ridden in rain the night before). Then I hit the road again, letting the bike dry in the wind.

Five miles later I look down and notice... my tank bag is gone! Yes, THAT tank bag - the one holding my GPS, my cell phone, and my wallet containing ID, credit cards, and $300 in cash. My blood turns to ice.

I pull a u-turn and tear back to town like a madman, hitting 89 mph at one point, and breaking several other traffic laws as well. I go back to the car wash and find.. NOTHING. I look in the trash can - nothing. I check with the businesses on either side - no one has turned in a tank bag.

I double back and ride my route more slowly this time, searching both sides of the road for the missing bag. Nothing.

My mind whirring, I ride to the police station. I enter, and walk down a hallway to a glass window. Four people look up at me - a police officer, and three office workers. The officer says, pleasantly, "Here's the guy in the yellow jacket." And there, on the table, was my tank bag! And everything was still inside!

Here's what happened. I must have thrown the bag on the tank and carelessly neglected to open the top two magnet flaps. Held only by the single bottom magnet, it fell off the tank on the first sharp turn I made. Oddly, I didn't see it or feel it fall. But a guy in a car saw it. And he stopped, picked it up, and tried to catch me, flashing his lights. But I didn't notice, and he watched the rider in the yellow jacket disappear in the traffic. So he turned around and took my bag to the police station.

My vacation was saved; my faith in humankind renewed. And here's a shout out to Drew from Fife Lake, MI - also a biker - for doing the right thing, and who declined my offer of a gift of thanksgiving.

:smiley_th
 

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Jack of all trades
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2,863 Posts
wow. That's amazing! Restores my faith in humanity just a little bit. Glad everything worked out for you. Here's hoping for smooth sailing on the rest of your trip.
 

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Registered
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Restores me a bit, too. Good story with a good ending! Thanks for sharing.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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5,072 Posts
Restores me a bit, too. Good story with a good ending! Thanks for sharing.
/\ X2, the good guys are far between it seems, good that you found one...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Registered
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6,446 Posts
That definitely sounds like an "adventure." Glad it worked out and thanks for posting here. The internet needs more stuff like this. Good luck on the rest of your trip! :motorcycl
 

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Registered
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445 Posts
Glad that there are still a few good cagers out there. I drop my wallet in an Alabama State Troopers office when I was renewing my CLD, had it in my helmet and it fell out when I went to take my eye test. Returned to the waiting room not 2 minutes later and the people that were setting next to me were gone.... So was my wallet.
 

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Just a regular guy
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833 Posts
Good deal... I am glad to say that I have seen multiple occurrences like this... the world hasn't gone totally to crap... yet!:smiley_th
 

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The first thing that I would have done, if I had found the bag, was to locate the ICE card/tag/sticker (In Case of Emergency). IMHO everyone riding a motorcycle (or bicycle even) should be carrying some form of ICE contact information. There should also be an ICE contact entry in your cell phone. The cell phone entry is the first thing a paramedic will look for, if you are rendered unconscious. There are even fancy ICE applications for smartphones, but a simple card/tag/sticker on the bag would be the best option.
 

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Rider on the Storm
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1,287 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The first thing that I would have done, if I had found the bag, was to locate the ICE card/tag/sticker (In Case of Emergency). IMHO everyone riding a motorcycle (or bicycle even) should be carrying some form of ICE contact information. There should also be an ICE contact entry in your cell phone. The cell phone entry is the first thing a paramedic will look for, if you are rendered unconscious. There are even fancy ICE applications for smartphones, but a simple card/tag/sticker on the bag would be the best option.
Good idea.

Of course, my wallet was in there, with every piece of personal information about me one could imagine. (driver's license, credit cards, insurance cards, business cards, etc. etc.) The ICE is on my cell phone, which was also in the bag.

I put ICE info around my ankle when I go for LONG runs.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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5,072 Posts
/\ I also have ICE numbers in my cell phone... I think it is a great idea, you never know...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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5,072 Posts
i had to google ice number... had no clue... lol... and now that I do... i realize i always have ice numbers on me.
I list mine as AAA ICE and that keeps them at the very top, and also lists my home number 1st (wife) so if I need to call with one hand I can easily... Also they are listed a second time under just ICE...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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93 750
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34 Posts
lost my wallet last year about 60 miles from home, but didnt realize it till i was home. Next day a guy in probably his early 20s was knocking on my door. He said he looked at my DL and knew the area so he just thought he would drop it off! Even though he lives more than 70 miles away. I tried to give him some money for his troubles but he wouldnt take it. good stuff, still some good people out there!
 

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2000 VN 750 Senior Member
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2,501 Posts
I was out with my daughter driving home one night after a nice father/daughter evening walk in Princeton. As we came to a cross walk I saw a wallet in the roadway. I stopped and picked it up looking for some form of identification. It was from a student in the Theological College there. We took the wallet to the local police station and left it with them to contact the owner. I had to give my name and such in case no one claimed it. One week later I received a note in the mail thanking me for being honest and making sure the wallet was returned. The owner said in the note that he lost it about an hour before I brought it to the police station and the police called him within thirty minutes after I left. He was without the wallet less than two hours. He also offered a monetary reward but I sent a written reply that if he would keep my family in his prayers even after his ordination it would be reward enough.

My daughter was just starting high school then and now she is twenty-five and on her own. She still brings up that story and tells me that it taught her a lesson of how doing the right thing can have special rewards. I am glad I was not alone and able to turn something simple into a life lesson for her.

It is always good to hear a story that renews my faith in mankind. I guess most people are really good deep inside after all.
 

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Premium Member
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3,027 Posts
Yes there are a few decent people in the world. Since I have so many medical conditions, I carry a USB flash drive with me in case of an accident or some other problem where I would be unable to communicate. I have several contact phone numbers on it as well. It would not have been in a tank bag though, I carry it in my jeans pocket. I never carry anything really valuable in a tank bag, T bag, or saddlebags. None of those lock, and anybody could just come along and grab them
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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7,960 Posts
Go to the msgroup.org site and scroll down to SAFETY VIDEOS.
Click on SAFETY TAGS and watch it!!
http://www.msgroup.org/
Only a minute or two in length and really makes you think about what medical and contact info the other riders in a group, and medical personnel--especially first responders, need to be able to find quickly if a downed rider is unable to communicate himself.

Lets set a good example guys, and be the first in your group to attach a HI-VIZ, ICE safety tag to your coat, or whatever else you might wear in hot weather. The tag on Davis's coat in the video looks to be attached much like a ski lift pass, and appears to be about the same size.

One thought on the topic of rewarding good Samaritans who return lost items of value.
I read several years ago that one of the Scandinavian countries, perhaps Sweden?, has a law mandating a reward of 15% of the returned items value to the finder.
Not sure if that is the right thing to do in all situations, but it is one approach.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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16,222 Posts
I am riding from SW Ohio to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I stop in Cadillac, MI to rinse off my bike (I had ridden in rain the night before). Then I hit the road again, letting the bike dry in the wind.

Five miles later I look down and notice... my tank bag is gone! Yes, THAT tank bag - the one holding my GPS, my cell phone, and my wallet containing ID, credit cards, and $300 in cash. My blood turns to ice.

I pull a u-turn and tear back to town like a madman, hitting 89 mph at one point, and breaking several other traffic laws as well. I go back to the car wash and find.. NOTHING. I look in the trash can - nothing. I check with the businesses on either side - no one has turned in a tank bag.

I double back and ride my route more slowly this time, searching both sides of the road for the missing bag. Nothing.

My mind whirring, I ride to the police station. I enter, and walk down a hallway to a glass window. Four people look up at me - a police officer, and three office workers. The officer says, pleasantly, "Here's the guy in the yellow jacket." And there, on the table, was my tank bag! And everything was still inside!

Here's what happened. I must have thrown the bag on the tank and carelessly neglected to open the top two magnet flaps. Held only by the single bottom magnet, it fell off the tank on the first sharp turn I made. Oddly, I didn't see it or feel it fall. But a guy in a car saw it. And he stopped, picked it up, and tried to catch me, flashing his lights. But I didn't notice, and he watched the rider in the yellow jacket disappear in the traffic. So he turned around and took my bag to the police station.

My vacation was saved; my faith in humankind renewed. And here's a shout out to Drew from Fife Lake, MI - also a biker - for doing the right thing, and who declined my offer of a gift of thanksgiving.

:smiley_th
good to hear.the other day,i put a gas can in my saddlebag to get gas to mow the lawn.stopped at the local Chinese buffet,and come out and gas can is gone.who would steal an empty 1 gallon gas can?i still havn't lost faith in 'us' yet,though
 

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Headbanger/Popes of Hell
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6,734 Posts
good to hear.the other day,i put a gas can in my saddlebag to get gas to mow the lawn.stopped at the local Chinese buffet,and come out and gas can is gone.who would steal an empty 1 gallon gas can?i still havn't lost faith in 'us' yet,though
oops! that was me. I borrowed you gas can and when I came back to put back in your saddlebag the bike was gone. j/k ;)

that is something, some one stealing a empty gas can. you'd think they would wait until the can was full. :doh: lol
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
Joined
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16,222 Posts
oops! that was me. I borrowed you gas can and when I came back to put back in your saddlebag the bike was gone. j/k ;)

that is something, some one stealing a empty gas can. you'd think they would wait until the can was full. :doh: lol
lol.that is funny.
 
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