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I am planning on removing the tank to check the elcetrical connection to the sending unit, and to see what else is under there :)
I mentioned this to a friend who wrenches her own HD and she said" Are you sure, ever done that before"
Now, that comment stopped me,:confused: is it really a big deal to do? Drain tank, remove hoses from petcock, unbolt and pull, correct?
Am I missing something?
TIA
David
 

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Vulcan Traitor ;)
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80 Posts
Tank removal on this motor is about a 2 minute procedure, and anybody that has trouble with it (on this bike) has no business with a wrench/ratchet in hand. Go for it. :smiley_th
 

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Tank removal on this motor is about a 2 minute procedure, and anybody that has trouble with it (on this bike) has no business with a wrench/ratchet in hand. Go for it. :smiley_th
I agree to remove the tank is a while 3 bolts 12 mm I if I remember correctly. There is absolutely nothing difficult about it
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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6,141 Posts
Draining the tank isn't just pulling the hose and letting it drain. You need to have vacuum going to the petcock (unless you have the one with "Prime", in which case it will drain by removing the hose)
Otherwise, it's pretty easy. Just be sure you don't lose the collars or rubber dampers at the side mounting points.
And, don't forget to be sure the vent tube is routed properly.
 

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Sparky!!!
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i pull mine all the time without worring about how full the tank is...yes it is easier to do when it is empty, but full isn't that bad either..half full is the worst trying to get it back on...the fule sloshing around makes it a little difficult to line up, but not that bad...but like posted above...if you have the prime instead of the reserve, then you will either have to drain or plug the lines so you don't spill fuel.
 

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A tank yank on these bikes is really pretty easy, but it's probably a whole 'nuther story on a Harley, which is probably why your "friend" made the comment. ;)
 

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I have never drained mine to pull it. 3 bolts, 5 hoses( Cali bike, yours may only have 4), 1 electrical connection, and it's off. Takes about 10 min the first time and about 3 thereafter. I do agree with Slim though that half full can be a pain because of fuel slosh but it's still not all that difficult. On a scale of 1-10 (1 being easiest and 10 being hardest) I'd rate it a 2 and that's only because of the hoses around the petcock.
 

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Premium Member
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A bit of advice: when you put the tank back on it, put it straight down vertically onto the frame. Don't put it on the frame and then slide it up into position or you risk breaking the coolant temp sensor that sticks up. Yes - I did that.

Mark
 

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Another tidbit. I pulled my tank last year to check the fuel sender too. When I re-connected the hoses a piece of the hose broke off inside the hose. The piece ended up getting jammed on top of the carb float valve. Ended up having to pull the carbs and disassemble to get the little piece of rubber out. I also replaced all the fuel hoses. If I had replaced the old hoses when I first pulled the tank I doubt I would have had a problem. The old hoses were pretty brittle.
 

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It depends on the year of the bike. The early Vn700 and 750 had the PRI RUN OFF valve. I'm not sure when Kaw decided to change (late 80s early 90s) to the RES RUN OFF valve but as long as it works, who cares. Mine's a 93 and has the RES RUN OFF valve.
 

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ExNewbie..Still Learnin'!
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256 Posts
Draining the tank isn't just pulling the hose and letting it drain. You need to have vacuum going to the petcock (unless you have the one with "Prime", in which case it will drain by removing the hose)
Otherwise, it's pretty easy. Just be sure you don't lose the collars or rubber dampers at the side mounting points.
And, don't forget to be sure the vent tube is routed properly.
Hyper - Saw your note on the "collars and rubber dampers" for the side bolts. I had the rubber mounts on both sides and the small "grommet tube" for each bolt but had a large brass-colored washer (between rubber and female frame) on one side. Apprently from my PO. Left the washer off since it didn't seem to serve a purpose but should I really go get another one?
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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Is my valve stock if it has a prime and a reserve as well as the normal operation posn?
Yep, like it's been said, that's stock (for earlier years)
Just be sure you don't leave it in the "Prime" postion if the bike isn't running.
Otherwise, you'll be leaking fuel once the bowls fill up.....and keep filling....and keep filling....and keep filling.....

When not running, leave it in the "Run" position. As this requires vacuum to make the fuel flow, and with the bike not running, there's no vacuum.

Hyper - Saw your note on the "collars and rubber dampers" for the side bolts. I had the rubber mounts on both sides and the small "grommet tube" for each bolt but had a large brass-colored washer (between rubber and female frame) on one side. Apprently from my PO. Left the washer off since it didn't seem to serve a purpose but should I really go get another one?
I don't see any reason you'd need it.
This is a pic from the micro fiche, and it shows no washer....
 

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ExNewbie..Still Learnin'!
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I don't see any reason you'd need it.
This is a pic from the micro fiche, and it shows no washer....
That was my thought as well but thanks for confirming for me!
 

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David,

My '85 VN700 has, what I think, is a vacumm hose that runs underneath the tank from around the battery area to a sensor of some kind buried in the middle of the tank. If you have that same hose you will want to lift the tank enough to get your hand in there and remove or detach that hose before final removal.

Piece 'o cake, do watch out for the rubber spacers on either side, where the mounting bolts go, they can fall off and slip down behind the air filters. No big deal, just a minor pain...
 

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CWO3 Navy (Retired)
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You can test the fuel guage without removing the tank. Remove the seat and the connector is right there on the left. Disconnect it, then put a jumper on the connector running to the guage itself and observe the guage, it should go to full. Don't leave the jumper any longer than to observe the guage. If it moves, then the guage is good and you need to replace the float assembly in the tank. I just did this, got mine from cheapcycleparts.com (great place to buy OEM parts for the Vulcan cheapest I've found). This procedure is described in the Cylmer manual, if you don't have one get one, it's a lifesaver.
 

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The line to the nipple on the tank is the carb vent line. On the later models it was fed into a hole in the left ear but on the 85, it went onto this nipple under the fuel tank. Glenn M found this out I guess and helped CMess with a high speed rough running situation by letting us know this little known tidbit.
 
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