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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm having trouble lining up the rear boot from the surge box. Front carb lines up perfectly, both carbs are set correctly in their intake boots and the intake boots are in the correct position on the heads. The rear boot seems to be too long. I try to force it on and the inside portion is far from being mounted. WTF! Any ideas?
 

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Check the repair manual. One boot stays on the head, the other stays on a carb.

Edit: I'm not sure which boots you're talking about, but the ones from the head to the carb go on as above. I don't recall which one stays where.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm questioning about the boots coming from the air box. The boots on the head to the carbs are positioned and hooked up correctly. Carbs are centered and secured fully. Just can't attach the air side of the rear carb. Fuel side is all good.
 

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When I removed the 'snorkels' from my 750 to get to the carbs to clean them and found so much frustration with just removing the ducts, I said, "Forget this!" and went with the full ear shave.
I have never regretted it.
 

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Did ya happen to notice they are different and one says R and the other says F? Cause you have them backwards. Assuming of course that you do have the pins aligned on the boots going to the jug or it doesn’t matter which hose you use it’ll never be right.
 

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Forget if they're both the same... Any chance they're reversed? Should be flexible enough to go right on if they're close.

Never had to put mine back, earshaved the first time. I'll take a look at them later today.
 

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All 4 pieces are different. All 4 are keyed with peg marks where they line up. If a single one is off the mark or the front one is in the back it wont work.
 

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Here are the pin marks on the boots that connect the carb to the jug which must be lined up. Correct orientation shown in my pic of the manual a few posts up. Also, this indention for the rear oil feed is the snorkel for the carb on the left side of the bike. The small indention is the left snorkel, the larger death star indention is the right carb snorkel.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sorry guys, when describing the surge box boots I guess I should have been referring to them as snorkels. My intake boots are in the proper place(I.e. tab on boot to mark on head). I'll try to take a picture of what I'm talking about on Monday when I get back home. My right/rear side "snorkel" is sticking out about an inch too far. It clearly sticks out more than the left/front side but the surge box hasn't moved.

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Are you referring to the short ducts that connect the air filter boxes to the surge tank?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No I'm referring to the right side tube that go from the surge box to the rear carb .

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You’re sure you don’t have them mixed up? They’re definitely a pain in the ass to get in right. What I did was throw them in a bowl of very hot soapy water for 15 minutes to get them soft and slippery and they popped right in. I fought one side for a good hour until I did that.
 

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Also try a Teflon spray, or WD-40. I did that for the carb to head boots. SOOOO much easier.
 

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They are difficult to poke back into place, the boot is bigger than the hole in the surge box. I found that folding (or collapsing) the end that goes into the surge box and tying a light cord around it allows you to place it into the box at the correct position with much less difficulty. Releasing the cord with the boot in position allows it to unfold and seal. Be sure to retrieve all of the cord.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well thanks everyone for the input. Turns out some how I got the left and right mixed up when putting them back in. Could have swore I had them in right the first time. Oh well, all good now. Luckily the boots are still nice and sort and pop right in and out.

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I don't recommend the earshave thing, but it is your bike. There is an easier way to install them. BTW I just call them elbows. And yes they are different. Make sure you have the right one in the right place. They are difficult to reach. I would do it with the tank off. At least you can get a little more light. A small LED penlight is also very helpful. Notice on the ends that go into the airbox, there is a groove. The top edge of that groove goes inside the airbox, the bottom edge goes up against the bottom of the airbox. If you will notice, there is quite a bit of very thick, very stiff rubber above this groove. Being VERY careful, and using a new blade, I took a box cutter knife and trimmed off some of that rubber. If you do this, don't get close to the groove. Those elbows are not cheap, and one slip of the knife could cost you $60, or maybe a finger. After you have trimmed off some of that rubber, the boots will be a lot more flexible where they go into the airbox. Spray them good with WD-40 to make them nice and slippery. DO NOT use a screwdriver to try and push them into the airbox. That mistake cost me $60. If you can't do it all with your fingers, get a piece of 1/4" wood dowel and sand the end round so it is not sharp. It's kind of like mounting a tire. Go all the way around and make sure the airbox is in the groove. Once it is in place, but not connected to the carb, it should turn freely in the airbox. Just like the bead on a tire, make sure the bottom edge of the groove is right up against the airbox. Then you can turn them as necessary to fit them on the carburetors. Once you do it the first time, it will be really easy if you have to do it again. It may take some thought the first time. Take your time. I used to have a picture of the rubber I cut off mine, but can't find it anywhere. It ran for over 40,000 miles after I put it back together with no problems.
 
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