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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #1
I found this on Motorcycle Cruiser Magazine`s site. We have all read similar lists over the almost year and a half that I have been on this forum. With my limited riding experience leading to the crash that has put me on crutches for the past 18 months, I figure that repetition in reading safety posts cannot be a bad thing. So read and meditate on how you can best put these suggestions to use in your riding habits. Happy New Year and safe riding wishes to all.

http://www.motorcyclecruiser.com/streetsurvival/0702_crup_motorcycle_safety/index.html
 

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Super Moderator
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Good advice, but a long list to remember. My Mantra for riding is, was, and always will be just two bits of wisdom:

1. Never hit anything with your bike.

2. Keep in mind at all times that every other vehicle on the road is there with the expressed purpose of trying to kill you.




KM
 

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Premium Member
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I can appreciate the safety mindset in the two simple Mantras submitted. I just want to ask though...how paranoid should I be? Is there a limit to the intensity in which I should fear that people "are trying to kill you". I am currently thinking that people "don't give a shi*" and by telling myself that...I am preparing myself for the idiots that can't drive etc.
 

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Your paranoia should not extend to the point that you are no longer having fun being on your bike.

It is more of a gentle acceptance that they are all out to kill you, but you being better, smarter and faster are out there to foil all their plans....it is more or less a game you are playing with them. ... your advantage is they do not know, that you know, that they are trying to kill you, so you are allowed to have some fun with it all. You of course have to keep a constant watch for their every move, and have stratagies in place to counter all of theirs.

The the next biggest advantage to you is , because you do know they are all trying to kill you, you can not get mad at them for doing so. Too many times riders get "pissed" at some pinheaded driver, and end up making mistakes, loosing the "Fun of being on your bike"... or worse yet do something stupid like flipping off the wrong driver. Anger is not a good emotion to have...especialy while riding. Remember what happend to Aniken Skywalker..........

So, if the guy in the cadilac cuts you off, you can not get mad at him...he is only trying to do his job (kill you)...the only person you should be angery at is youself.. for not seeing it coming.

The key here is just simply accept they have their mission, and yours of course is to make them fail. If you can not do this while remaining emotionally detatched from their actions, you should not be piloting a motorcycle.

Thus you must be confident that your skills are superior to theirs.


KM
 

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Thanks for posting, Hoss. Some helpful tips there.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Good advice, but a long list to remember. My Mantra for riding is, was, and always will be just two bits of wisdom:

1. Never hit anything with your bike.

2. Keep in mind at all times that every other vehicle on the road is there with the expressed purpose of trying to kill you.




KM
I agree that you cannot remember all of the bits and pieces of advice given for safe riding here, or anywhere all the time. Your two part mantra sumarizes it all, and serves you, with 30+ years riding experience, very well by your own account.

My purpose in posting these safety tips is to help the many newcomers to riding to be able to read and then visualize themselves applying the individual principle being highlighted, while sitting at home. Practice it over in your mind, just like doing a preride inspection, so that in time it becomes an automatic reflex action, with little or no conscious thought to respond.

KM, I believe that is the point you have attained in your riding skills. You do not have to think about individual responses to traffic moving around you. Your "brain speed", honed by many years of experience, allows you to see, decide on a couse of action, and execute it in a fraction of the time it would take me or many other new riders.

Let me illustrate a similar idea with an example from my own life. I have been driving for over 50 of my near 57 years. I slide behind the wheel, insert the key, start the car, put on my seatbelt, check/adjust the mirrors, engage the brake, shift into gear, shoulder check and smoothly pull out in more or less one fluid movement. It takes me less time to do it than to describe it.

One of my sons-in-law, at age 27, had hardly ever driven when he married my oldest daughter. She did most of the driving for the first several years they were married. He came with me to bring the car home from the service station at Christmas time about 10 years ago. When we were ready to go, I stood waiting to open the door (it was about -30*C outside, so I wanted to open and close the door as quickly as possible for the comfort of the other mechanics in the shop.) He got in and started the car, so I opened the door. He then fiddled around for at least a couple of minutes adjusting mirrors, putting on the seatbelt, yada, yada, yada, until he finally pulled out. I could have pulled out and back in again 4 or 5 times by the time he finally got out so I could close the door.

I was losing patience with him because he had to make each move deliberately, and think about it, where for me it was all an almost automatic action.

So to all you new riders like me, read all you can at home and think about how it applies to you, do some "chair riding" and practice just as though you are riding the bike.

Then later, on every ride you make, pick one area of your riding you want to improve, and critique yourself or have an experienced riding buddy do it for you if possible.:motorcycl:motorcycl
 
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I have to totally agree with KM here. Be as paranoid as possible without making your ride miserable. Whether everybody out there is actually trying to get you is irrelevant, their behavior is the same. You have to look for danger in everything, and be ready for it. That attitude has gotten me safely through 35 years and over 400,000 miles of street riding. After a few years, it eventually becomes instinctive, you see, anticipate, and react without thinking about it. But it is still one reason why I spend so many miles and so much time on interstate highways. You can back off just a little, and relax and enjoy the ride a little more. Also another reason I don't care for sportbikes any more. Too much work. Now I like to just hit the interstate and cruise, hour after hour, mile after mile. Much better than sitting in a recliner in front of a TV.

I think 2010 is about here. Counting down the minutes....... Happy New Year!!!!!!! Jerry.



Looks like I got in the first post of the year, AZ time. EXACTLY 12:00 am, 2010!!!!!!!
 

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"Your paranoia should not extend to the point that you are no longer having fun being on your bike." I just couldn't resist posting this. I believe the same thing applies to "gear". There is such a thing as to much gear. There is such a thing as "to much" of anything. Spending 20 minutes putting on gear, and another 20 minutes taking it off, for a 10 minute ride, is beyond absurd. Just take the car. Even on a longer ride, to much "gear" can ruin your ride. Use some common sense. Wear long pants, sturdy shoes, a jacket if it is not to hot, and always a helmet. Put at least as much thought into dressing to prevent a crash (high visibility) as preparing for one. Remember, all the gear in the world, besides a helmet, will only protect you from abrasion injuries, it will not prevent broken bones or serious internal injuries from an impact with something besides the road, and it will not protect you from serious damage to muscles, tendons, and ligaments when you go tumbling end over end down the road. All of this is of course my own personal opinion, and nothing else.

As for things 20 feet in front of you, I have successfully countersteered around objects as close or closer than 20 feet away many times, sometimes missing them by inches, but I would have hit them had I done nothing. Jerry.
 

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That's a good list. Thanks for posting.

That being said, I agree with KM as those are two very good rules to ride by. Hitting anything with one's bike is generally incompatible with the desire to live as much a pain-free existence as possible (aside from the incompatibility with life in general issues). The fact that they're all out to kill us is pretty well a given...

--FA
 

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Columbus, Ohio
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This is good information. It was not a check list of things to do before you release the clutch.
Time and experience equal wisdom. The longer you ride and learn, the less necessary this information will be.
I don't think the wise, veteran riders who have reduced their lists to a few entries want the newbies to disregard this information.

I believe that drivers behave like blind drones because they were never taught, in a meaningful way, how to look for motorcycles. We see little kids easily. Even if all that is in the street is a toy or a ball, we see kids. We see pedestrians wearing black at night, and skate boarders where ever they pop out onto the road. Bikers driving cars see bikes because they are aware of the possibility of bikes. Drivers don't seem to be aware.

I don't thnk most drivers are stupid or vindictive, although some obviously are. Most are driving around with their heads in that warm place, and only react to what they have learned on the road, the hard way, or learned years ago in drivers ed.

Until drivers' training changes its emphasis, or until bikes become so numerous that drivers can't help but see them, things will not change. We can become more visible, or more proactive, but it is up to them to not kill us. Any wisdom that can be passed on to other bikers can only help.
 

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I
My purpose in posting these safety tips is to help the many newcomers to riding to be able to read and then visualize themselves applying the individual principle being highlighted, while sitting at home. Practice it over in your mind, just like doing a preride inspection, so that in time it becomes an automatic reflex action, with little or no conscious thought to respond.


Yes, please do not take my foreshortened version as a replacement. I urge all new, and even older riders to go over that list, and also spend some time thinking about other scenerios they might encounter and what courses of action they should consider utilizing.

Your other post on "learning" is a good one too. I in many ways compare riding a motorccycle to karate. My teacher there always said that:

"There are no real masters...you are always a "student". Every day for the rest of your life you are and will be constantly learning. You will never reach a point where you can not do better"


I have always taken those words an applied them to my "study" of riding a motorcycle. Even with all my "experiance" I sometimes find myself learing new techniques or new ways of addressing a situation.

New riders do need to "study" much harder, but do not let the fact that you have survived dozens of years on the road lull you into a false sense of confidence. You can always learn something new, and the dangers you face are always changing.


KM
 

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"There are no real masters...you are always a "student". Every day for the rest of your life you are and will be constantly learning. You will never reach a point where you can not do better"

That is true of everything in life. However, if you ride on a regular basis, most of your skills will come from the first few years of riding, after that, things drop off sharply, but you continue to learn and get better, to some degree, as long as you continue to ride.

The main thing is not to become complacent, even though you have been riding for awhile with no accidents. Always be alert and ready. And things change. There are always new dangers to deal with. The advent of handheld cell phones has made riding in traffic far more dangerous than it was before, and I foresee the situation only getting worse.

So while the first 5 years or so of a new riders life are by far the most dangerous, the danger of riding never goes away. Fortunately, the fun of riding never goes away either, and the longer you survive, the longer you will be around to enjoy it. Jerry.
 

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Awesome.

Your paranoia should not extend to the point that you are no longer having fun being on your bike.

It is more of a gentle acceptance that they are all out to kill you, but you being better, smarter and faster are out there to foil all their plans....it is more or less a game you are playing with them. ... your advantage is they do not know, that you know, that they are trying to kill you, so you are allowed to have some fun with it all. You of course have to keep a constant watch for their every move, and have stratagies in place to counter all of theirs.

The the next biggest advantage to you is , because you do know they are all trying to kill you, you can not get mad at them for doing so. Too many times riders get "pissed" at some pinheaded driver, and end up making mistakes, loosing the "Fun of being on your bike"... or worse yet do something stupid like flipping off the wrong driver. Anger is not a good emotion to have...especialy while riding. Remember what happend to Aniken Skywalker..........

So, if the guy in the cadilac cuts you off, you can not get mad at him...he is only trying to do his job (kill you)...the only person you should be angery at is youself.. for not seeing it coming.

The key here is just simply accept they have their mission, and yours of course is to make them fail. If you can not do this while remaining emotionally detatched from their actions, you should not be piloting a motorcycle.

Thus you must be confident that your skills are superior to theirs.


KM
Thanks for the excellent dialogue.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thanks KM for the reinforcement of the idea for all riders , new or experienced, to be constantly a learner, open to new or better ways to see or do something.

David Hough in his book, "Proficient Motorcycling" has a chart showing that the most dangerous time in a riding "career" is not as a brand new green rider. Statistically it is between 25 to 36 months.

(The remainder of this post has been edited, added to and corrected from what I posted last night.)

The following chart is taken from the HURT REPORT done in Southern California in ~1970.

1.0 would be average.
Above 1.0 means a higher than average risk.
Below 1.0 means a lower than average risk.

EXPERIENCE RIDING IN TRAFFIC.............RISK

0-6 months------------------------------------1.40
7-12 months-----------------------------------0.96
13-24 months---------------------------------0.93
25-36 months---------------------------------1.52
37-48 months---------------------------------0.98
48+ months-----------------------------------0.83

These numbers show that a rider with less than 6 months` experience is almost twice as likely to have an accident as a rider with more than 4 years. That is expectable. The shocker is that the rider with 2 to 3 years experience is even more likely to crash than the new kid. The lesson here is that riders get cocky when they think they have learned it all-about two years into the learning curve. This subject has not been addressed recently by the NHTSA or other statistics-gathering organizations. It would be interesting to know how motorcycling experience relates to risk in today`s riding environment, especially with so many riders getting into motorcycling later in life. (The preceding commentary is David Hough`s.)

So all of you who are starting your 3rd year of riding, be careful. The biggest danger you face this season may be YOURSELF!!
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #17
Someone kill this guy off...(I'm done reading his jokes)

SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM AND SPAM
8 shots from the SPAM gun eh, KM. It must be a .45 !!:boxing:
 

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FYI, the Hurt Report was published in 1981, and is to date the most comprehensive study of motorcycle accidents, their causes, and ways to prevent them ever done. I obtained a paper copy shortly after it came out, and still have it. I probably owe Harry Hurt my life many times over. Jerry.
 

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Undercover Sportbiker
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1.0 would be average.
Above 1.0 means a higher than average risk.
Below 1.0 means a lower than average risk.

EXPERIENCE RIDING IN TRAFFIC.............RISK

25-36 months---------------------------------1.52

So all of you who are starting your 3rd year of riding, be careful. The biggest danger you face this season may be YOURSELF!!
I had my first (and so far only) crash right at 25 months, and I posted about it here, so I won't go into detail.

On another bike forums, a guy was recently in a crash. Waiting at a stop sign, lady coming form his right making a left turn onto the street where he was turned and drove right into him an up onto his bike. The saddest part is that hse was at a dead stop for oncoming traffic who had the right of way, so there was NO reason it should have happened. The biggest dialogue starter was that the rider insists that there was nothing he could have done to prevent it. The argument is that in almost every case, collisions are avoidable. I can see both sides of the argument. I know in my crash, there were at least 3 things I could have done to not crash. The first and foremost would have been to listen to that little voice in my head that said something bad was going to happen, based on what I had observed at the intersection. That voice was 100% right.

The take aways everyone should get here is that you have to ride "offensively." By that I do not mean go around banging on cars and knocking mirrors off. I mean be proactive and assume that the cars around you are going to do the worst thing imaginable to you, and then plan as much as possible to prevent the situation from happening or avoid it if it does by having an "out." One good thing to remember is that in the majority of cases, the brakes will be your best bet. All too often, people talk about the need to "accelerate out of the situation" when a good dose of brakes will have the same effect only much faster.
 

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Expert Advice Giver
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I set my phasers to "stun" and simply ride around the frozen cagers. I am installing a cloaking device I stole off of a Romanians Rocket III (or was he a Romulan?). I'll let you know how that works.

There are some good tips in that article. Thanks OlHossCanada aka Gordon!
 
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