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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

Quick question for ya. So I put the bike up for storage (I'm nearly embarrassed to say but it had to be done) and I followed all the advice I was given: thorough cleaning, oil change, WD40 the bike, run out the gas in the carbs, SeaFoam etc... So, I threw the bike cover on and took the train home from the garage I was keeping her in.

Then, I realized I'd forgotten to take 10PSI out of the tires, and the bike is not on its center stand. In short: do I need to travel back out to the garage (2 hour trip by train) to put the bike on its center stand and let some air out of the tires? Or, will the bike be fine parked with the kickstand with the tires at the Clymer's recommended tire PSI? The bike will be stored till end of March, weather permitting. Any advice will be much appreciated. Thanks all!

John
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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Hey all,

Quick question for ya. So I put the bike up for storage (I'm nearly embarrassed to say but it had to be done) and I followed all the advice I was given: thorough cleaning, oil change, WD40 the bike, run out the gas in the carbs, SeaFoam etc... So, I threw the bike cover on and took the train home from the garage I was keeping her in.

Then, I realized I'd forgotten to take 10PSI out of the tires, and the bike is not on its center stand. In short: do I need to travel back out to the garage (2 hour trip by train) to put the bike on its center stand and let some air out of the tires? Or, will the bike be fine parked with the kickstand with the tires at the Clymer's recommended tire PSI? The bike will be stored till end of March, weather permitting. Any advice will be much appreciated. Thanks all!
John
Well if it was me I wouldn't make a special trip, shucks most bikes don't even have a center stand (mine dosen't, but I wish it did), and some way they survive the winter months...lol...
As for dropping the air pressure 10 psi, I think the cold weather will take care of that, especially since it is on the side stand with a bit more weight on the tires...
That being said, if I happened to be in the area for some other reason, I might put'er on the center stand just to take some weight off the tires...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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I think I read somewhere that the tires should be sitting on wood, not cement, when stored for more than a month or so. Mine aren`t, but has anyone else heard of this?
 

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I think I read somewhere that the tires should be sitting on wood, not cement, when stored for more than a month or so. Mine aren`t, but has anyone else heard of this?
Yes. It is a good idea to to use the centerstand...if only to get the tires off the ground. The rear is off the ground with the centerstand, and it has been reccomended to put a thick 2 inch stack of newspapers under the front tire, or to use a couple of blocks to raise it up off the floor (not so much that the rear touches down)

I have never heard of letting air out of a tire for storage...actually just the opposite, to fill the tire to max pressure.( 40+ psi )
(This of course if not in a heated enviroment for the winter)

I would also make sure there is a whole bunch of Seafoam in the carbs and tank, that the tank is full, and I would use a soft cotton sheet and not a plastic tarp to cover it.

There are several threads on "winterizing" that should help, so I would in the next few weeks take a trip back out to make sure the bike is stored properly if it is going to be 3-4 months.

What did you do with the battery?


KM
 

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In the manual for my VN1600, it says to store the bike with the tires on wood, and to lower the tire pressure. I think I lowered the pressure on my wife's bike about 5 psi. The reason for keeping the tires off the cement is that cement sucks the moisture out of anything that sits on it. The tires will dry rot faster otherwise.
 

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In the manual for my VN1600, it says to store the bike with the tires on wood, and to lower the tire pressure. .

I'd still like to know what the logic is behind lowering the tire pressure...for cold weather storage.

Really , even if the bike were locked in a shed where the temps rose rather than fell, an increase in ambient tempature to even 130 degrees would not cause any significant rise in tire pressure.

If anything, it would almost make sence to me for you to let ALL the air out of a tire... so still not sure what letting out 5-6 psi is going to accomplish.

???????


KM
 

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My Tire Storage $0.02

Tires on bikes stored out-of-doors, should be protected by opaque covers to prevent damage from sunlight.

Storage area should be level, well drained. Care should be taken to avoid prolonged contact with petroleum based substances: oils, fuels and asphalt. If on concrete, wood should be placed under the tires.

Bike should be raised on center stand, so weight is removed from the tires. (keep from developing flat spots)
If no center stand, tire pressure should be increased 10~25% from normal inflation to keep tire roundness. Underinflation makes no sense to me.

If not on the center stand, the bike should be moved once and a while to prevent flat spotting and ozone cracking at the tire sidewall flex point. Flat spots usually disappear when the tires warm-up, after a 25+ mile drive. Flat spotting, which occurs on vehicles not moved for six or more months may not disappear.

Do not store the bike close to electric motors and such. They produce ozone which will deteriorate the rubber.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cool, thanks for the info, and I'm glad to hear that there isn't such an urgency.

KM: battery's hooked to a tender nearby.

In the next few weeks I'll make it out there and put up the center-stand, drop a piece of wood under the tires, and not bother with the tire pressure.

Thanks so much, as usual.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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Hey, one other thing, you did check the anti-freeze/coolant didn't you...???
That for sure should be up to snuff... I just happened to think of it, and checked that it was not mentioned before, my excuse is, mine's air cooled, not raggin as I prefer water cooled...:beerchug:...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I checked the anti freeze level about a month or so before I put it into storage. I mean, there was in fact antifreeze, perhaps a little low of a level, but bike was running fine so I haven't given it a second thought. Also, no where can I remember reading about anti-freeze checks in putting a bike up for the winter:

Why is it important, and what kind of anti-freeze do you use/think is best?

John
 

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Winter storage from the verses:
http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1192

(From above link)
26.10.2. Be sure to test your antifreeze to make sure it is up to snuff for the type of winter you have in your area. This is a must for outdoor storage and not as critical if you can keep the bike in a garage or heated basement.

More info about antifreeze than you ever wanted to know from the verses:
http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1095

IMHO use green ethelyne glycol based antifreeze marked suitable for aluminum.
Green is easier to see when checking the level in the overflow bottle.
50/50 mix with distilled water to prevent corrosion.
 

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So I know I'm hard headed and will get a bit of flack on this, but I have and always will run a stronger mix than recommended, I run about a 2:1 Prestone antifreeze/coolant... Whats the old saying-"Theres no fool like an old fool"...lol...
This mixture not only protects a good bit more in extreme cold, it also adds a small bit more boil over protection under overheating conditions, then there is the possibility of needing to add a bit of water when you are on the road, 2:1 will let you add a bit of water and still maintain the recommended 1:1 or 50:50 ratio...
I think it read like 50% gave a -34*F protection and 70% gave down to -84*F, but only picked up +10*F on the hot side on the back of my Prestone jug, do I need the -84*F protection, absolutly not, the +10*F hopefully not but possibly...
I won't drain anything out to make the change, I just start out that way when I change or have a need to add, thats what I shoot for... Thats just me, and I'm too old to change...lol...
I don't skimp on putting it in, but on the other hand I don't change every year either, more like every 5 years, if it looks good and tests good...
Have a good one Old Dog...
 

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So I know I'm hard headed and will get a bit of flack on this, but I have and always will run a stronger mix than recommended, I run about a 2:1 Prestone antifreeze/coolant... ...
I know this was discussed before. 2:1 would be a 66% antifreeze mix, not really that high. For cold , you likely are coverd there, but for summer you are really doing yourself a disservice as water is a much better coolant than antifreeze, so running more antifreeze than needed then is just keeping your vechicles hotter.

If you do live where it is nasty cold...not a problem using more , for that "just in case" temp plunge.

If of course your vehicle seems to need its radiator topped off that much, guessing it must have a problem and keeping the stronger mix to counter adding water on the road is your fix.

Both my Vulcan and my FJR have 50/50 mixes in them, and I do not think I have ever had to "top off" the coolant tank in either of them. I've had my FJR for 4 going on 5 years now, and the coolant level seems to be exactly where it was the day I brought it home. (OK, maybe a half inch lower;) )


You do what makes you happy there Old Dog, don't let any of these young'uns tell you any different.

KM
 
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