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Discussion Starter #1
Is there any way to lube the steering stem bearings without having to disassemble the gages, handle bars, and remove the fork?
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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I have not had the pleasure of having to lube mine yet, but from a look through the section in the Clymer manual pertaining to the head bearings, it appears everything you mentioned has to come off.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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OK, removing the top nut, washer etc. gets you to the top bearing.

It still appears to me that a lot more components have to be removed to get the steering stem out to get to the lower steering stem bearing.

Am I missing something here slim???
 

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Sparky!!!
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ok so its a little more complicated than what I said, but not much, before removing the top nut, loosen the fork clamp bolts then remove the nut, once the nut is removed, the top clamp will be able to lift off, and the bottom clamp can then be slid down the forks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys, I appreciate your help. Sorry I did not respone sooner I have been offline for a while. Thanks again.
 

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You need to remove a ton of stuff. Front wheel, fender, forks, brakes, handlebars, instrument panel, headlight, and a whole bunch of little parts. Going by the book here, I have never had mine apart, and see no reason to take them apart unless a problem shows up. Steering head bearings, just like swing arm bearings wear very slowly, they can be adjusted without removing all that stuff. Unless you've been using a high pressure washer, like a car wash, on the bike, the grease in there should be good for over 100,000 miles. If I ever do find a problem with mine that an adjustment won't fix, then and only then will I take them apart, and after going to all that trouble, I will certainly be installing new bearings.


Very few bikes have ever had their steering head apart. The manufacturer just puts that on the maintenance schedule because it is a labor intensive job, and they see $$$$. Jerry.
 

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Sparky!!!
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You need to remove a ton of stuff. Front wheel, fender, forks, brakes, handlebars, instrument panel, headlight, and a whole bunch of little parts. Going by the book here, I have never had mine apart, and see no reason to take them apart unless a problem shows up. Steering head bearings, just like swing arm bearings wear very slowly, they can be adjusted without removing all that stuff. Unless you've been using a high pressure washer, like a car wash, on the bike, the grease in there should be good for over 100,000 miles. If I ever do find a problem with mine that an adjustment won't fix, then and only then will I take them apart, and after going to all that trouble, I will certainly be installing new bearings.


Very few bikes have ever had their steering head apart. The manufacturer just puts that on the maintenance schedule because it is a labor intensive job, and they see $$$$. Jerry.
Once again your arrogance and ignorance precedes you... I just got done putting my bike back together... I disassembled it to the frame, short of an engine pull, to inspect the bearings on most of the harder to lube points... i.e. the steering head, swing arm, and wheel bearings. All I did was removed the cover for the handle bar risers, the handle bars, loosened up the tripple tree clamps, removed the top nut, slid off the upper tripple tree and slid down the lower tripple tree. I left the fend intact and the front wheel intact. Once I saw how dry my steering head bearings were, I decided to pull the front wheel bearing as well to lube them... the forks never left the bike. The book doesn't t3ell you all the shortcuts to removing everything... like you said they tack on extra stuff into the manuals so that the shops can charge more labor.
 

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Once again your arrogance and ignorance precedes you... I just got done putting my bike back together... I disassembled it to the frame, short of an engine pull, to inspect the bearings on most of the harder to lube points... i.e. the steering head, swing arm, and wheel bearings. All I did was removed the cover for the handle bar risers, the handle bars, loosened up the tripple tree clamps, removed the top nut, slid off the upper tripple tree and slid down the lower tripple tree. I left the fend intact and the front wheel intact. Once I saw how dry my steering head bearings were, I decided to pull the front wheel bearing as well to lube them... the forks never left the bike. The book doesn't t3ell you all the shortcuts to removing everything... like you said they tack on extra stuff into the manuals so that the shops can charge more labor.
Like I said, I went by the book, and have never done this with a Vulcan 750. I doubt a dealer would do all that either, but they would probably charge you for it. I would probably do even more than that on my own bike, I am very meticulous when it comes to my own vehicles. I just can't see any reason to do it at the moment. At 45,000 miles the steering stem is tight, but turns freely, there is no binding, I don't use high pressure water on it, and it doesn't often get ridden in the rain. I'll just keep checking it, and when I do find a problem that adjusting the bearings doesn't fix, I'll tear into it as soon as I have the time. There is nothing in there that could cause a catastrophic failure, it would wear slowly. Jerry.
 
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