Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm new to this forum, and the Vulcan is basically my first motorcycle, so bear with me. Maybe you guys can help me.

The 1986 VN750 has eaten 2 batteries in 1 season and has left me stranded once, in my ignorance, I jumped the bike using a car to get it going, don't know if I did perm. damage.

Anyways, I replaced the battery with an AGM that puts out 210 CCA and replaced the R/R (did not relocate it however, just installed it under the box. Removing the battery box was a learning experience for me so you can get an idea about much of a novice I am).

After the R/R replacement I thought my problems with charging would be solved but I am still getting readings of:
12 to 12.5 at idle
13 to 13.5 when revving

I have a second (older, analog) Multimeter and it reads 13 at idle and almost 14 when revving. And no I don't know the RPMS because the tach is broken.

These are the same readings I was getting with the old regulator.

Anyways I've been using this forum and was able to locate the stator wires which look melted at the bullet style connection points. I attached some pics. I could probably use a soldering iron but it looks like accessing the wires would not be ideal. What kind of wire should I use?
[/url] pic1[/IMG]

[/url] pic 2[/IMG]
What do you guys recommend I do?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
I soldered GXL wire directly from the stator to the R/R. Also, if you still have the GB, do yourself a favor and relocate the R/R.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
What gauge GXL wire? Looks like 16 or 18.

So you just cut the wire before the connector and then reattached it to the R/R? DId you solder then tape or solder then heat shrink?

Do you think these wires could be affecting my charging system performance? I can't disconnect them to test them with my multimeter. They are melted together.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
I used 14 AWG GXL wire; soldered and shrink wrapped. I actually cut mine back farther than the bullets..... Considering that the juice for the charging system comes from these three wires, it could be a problem....and if they are melted.....well, yeah.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,778 Posts
They don't look melted to me, but the pics aren't that good. Usually, when they burn, the insulation is cooked and I don't see that. Try disconnecting, spray with plastic safe electric contact cleaner, let dry, apply dielectric grease to contacts and reconnect. Then check voltage again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I wasn't able to disconnect them with even moderate force.

I successfully soldered the connections, but I want to wire directly into the R/R and not use the old wires taped in a bunch with lots of other wiring.

I think the only way to do this is to carefully cut away the wires from the main taped bunch and follow them that way. Is there a way to know which is which? Are they all the same (IE it doesn't matter which spot you put them into?)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
Not sure what you are asking.... if you mean the yellow wires, then yes any of them can be interchanged at the the R/R
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Yeah I mean the yellow wires. I messed around with the r/r connector and wasn't able to remove the connectors without really forcing them out. I reconnected it using the old wires but left a small amount of slack so that I can later buy a new connector and wire it directly to the R/R connector (without using the old wires--interestingly the yellow wires BEFORE the bullet connector are 14 gauge and the wires after it are 16 gauge.)

Anways my results weren't much different:
idle 12.5v to 12.8v
healthy revving of the engine: 13v to 13.5v

BTW my ancient analog multimeter reads 14v when revving and 13 at idle.

They are basically the same as before but I noticed they are more consistent (IE when I revv they go up immediately and consistently, whereas before revving would sometimes not affect the reading)

I don't know if this is enough but we will see if this new battery dies like the last two. Then I will have to make a hard choice as to whether to replace the stator.
 

·
Member? ... check.
Joined
·
546 Posts
Lots of good previous advice here.
Try using some pliers to pull the bullet connectors apart. They look more corroded than welded. I think while I was cleaning the contacts of the bullet connectors I would do a stator test procedure.
(I see you have already soldered the wires ... never mind)
Do a "stator test" search in this forum, read up on it, and check the condition of your stator before considering a replacement.
The connectors and terminals of the R/R could probably use a good cleaning too. Re-assemble all connectors, packing them with dielectric grease.
I would do these things maticulously before considering further component replacements.

Good luck ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
Let me chime in on this a bit, I just replaced my stator (it went bad) and got a new Mosfet R/R. In the normal (stock)configuration of the bike at idle you wont read much more then battery voltage, untill you go up on the RPMS then the R/R will start to put out a higher voltage for charging, so what your seeing there is normal. One problem you are going to have if you take the stator wires and go directly to the R/R it will cause the headlight not to work. One of the stator wires is spliced inside the harness and it goes to the junction box for the headlight relay, this makes it so the headlight only comes on when the bike is running. You can move a wire to make the headlight work when the key is on, But the way I see it if your wires are good at the bullet connectors, (inspect them after stripping the insulation) and solder them together or get a different type 3 pin connector and reattatch them. I havent done it yet but im going to get a 3 pin connector and get rid of them bullets. Also going to get some kind of voltage monitor so I have a visual indication that my charging system is working. With the new mosfet R/R I get close to 14 VDC all the time. I left to go to work one morning (still being dark outside) got about 20 feet down the road i noticed I didnt have a headlight. That was the only indication I had that there was a problem, turned out to be a bad stator. If it would of been daylight I never would of known untill the bike quit running.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
...Re-assemble all connectors, packing them with dielectric grease...
I have to disagree here............
The contacts should be cleaned, a spray contact cleaner is best or even WD-40 will do the trick. The grease should not come in contact with electrical conductors. It is non-conductive and does nothing to improve the connection. The grease is meant to seal the connector and keep moisture out. Clean the contacts, reassemble, then seal the connection with grease.
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
I have to disagree here............
The contacts should be cleaned, a spray contact cleaner is best or even WD-40 will do the trick. The grease should not come in contact with electrical conductors. It is non-conductive and does nothing to improve the connection. The grease is meant to seal the connector and keep moisture out. Clean the contacts, reassemble, then seal the connection with grease.
dariv I have to disagree with some of your points:

I do agree he contacts should be cleaned, preferably with a plastic friendly spray cleaner.

The die-electric grease IS non-conductive but should be packed tightly around the connectors. The metal contacts will force the grease from between their surfaces and current will flow freely. The grease does not increase conductivity, but neither does it`s insulating qualities impede it.

As you say, it`s purpose is to seal the conductors from moisture, thereby preventing future corrosion. How better to do that, than to be coated on the suface of the metal?:smiley_th
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
If you want me to believe that it's better to clean the electrical contacts and then smear them with a non-conductive goo before re-connecting them, your barking up the wrong tree here. :doh:
Why clean them at all then?
I have no doubt that your method works, but it is not better. It is in fact worse, for the above mentioned reason. Not to mention, that grease is expensive.... it is really only needed on the ceramic of the spark plugs. Other than that, at12VDC, just about any high temp sealant would do just fine on electrical connectors.
 

·
Linkmeister Supreme
Joined
·
7,960 Posts
If you want me to believe that it's better to clean the electrical contacts and then smear them with a non-conductive goo before re-connecting them, your barking up the wrong tree here. :doh:
Why clean them at all then?
I have no doubt that your method works, but it is not better. It is in fact worse, for the above mentioned reason. Not to mention, that grease is expensive.... it is really only needed on the ceramic of the spark plugs. Other than that, at12VDC, just about any high temp sealant would do just fine on electrical connectors.
Well, I`ve done a little reseach and there is some difference of opinion on the use of dielectric grease. I must admit that I have never used it on my cars in 35-40 years of performing most of my own repairs and maintenance. I only bought my first tube (not really expensive @ 100 grams or 3 1/2 oz for $3.50) after learning how to use it here on this board. The Clymer manual recommends "packing" one side of the connector full then plugging in the mate, and filling the backs to seal them from moisture and corrosion.

This link suggests use more as you have described, BUT says you can apply it to the metal portion of the connector too.
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-dielectric-grease.htm

Quote from above link. Bold and italic highlights are mine.
While the indicated use of dielectric grease calls for it to be used only on the non-metal parts of a connection, it has been shown to be effective at preventing corrosion when applied directly to the metal connectors as well. Care should be taken when using it in this way, because this application can, in some instances, cause the connection to stop working. A common reason for such a failure is that the grease has not been pushed entirely out of the way between the two points of contact.
IMO if the connectors fit so loosely that they won`t squish the grease out from between the contact points, they are TOO LOOSE.

I will be applying a thin film of dielectric grease on the contact points in the future to prevent corrosion.
 

·
Member? ... check.
Joined
·
546 Posts
I have to disagree here............
The contacts should be cleaned, a spray contact cleaner is best or even WD-40 will do the trick. The grease should not come in contact with electrical conductors. It is non-conductive and does nothing to improve the connection. The grease is meant to seal the connector and keep moisture out. Clean the contacts, reassemble, then seal the connection with grease.
While WD-40 will aid in removing moisture and cleaning, and make the connectors slide on and off easier; It will also leave an oily residue that will attract contaminants. There are better non-residue contact cleaners for this purpose. The grease is not only meant to keep moisture out, but also the more reactive element, oxygen.

Well, I`ve done a little reseach and there is some difference of opinion on the use of dielectric grease. I must admit that I have never used it on my cars in 35-40 years of performing most of my own repairs and maintenance. I only bought my first tube (not really expensive @ 100 grams or 3 1/2 oz for $3.50) after learning how to use it here on this board. The Clymer manual recommends "packing" one side of the connector full then plugging in the mate, and filling the backs to seal them from moisture and corrosion.

This link suggests use more as you have described, BUT says you can apply it to the metal portion of the connector too.
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-dielectric-grease.htm

Quote from above link. Bold and italic highlights are mine.

IMO if the connectors fit so loosely that they won`t squish the grease out from between the contact points, they are TOO LOOSE.

I will be applying a thin film of dielectric grease on the contact points in the future to prevent corrosion.
The electrical connections under the hood of your car have far more inherent protection from the elements than the underbelly of a VN750. They are usually of better quality as well (NEMA rated). Motorcycle connectors have more exposure, and require a little special attention.

I'm gonna keep packin' my connectors, I've had great luck so far.

Later,
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
While WD-40 will aid in removing moisture and cleaning, and make the connectors slide on and off easier; It will also leave an oily residue that will attract contaminants.
What, and grease won't attract contaminants???

There are better non-residue contact cleaners for this purpose.
Yup, that's why I said to use one......and that WD-40 would 'do the trick' as well..... but not the first choice.

Motorcycle connectors have more exposure, and require a little special attention.
Yup, I agree......

I'm gonna keep packin' my connectors, I've had great luck so far.
Never said that it wouldn't work...... it's just a waste and may even interfere with a good connection, electrically.
 

·
Member? ... check.
Joined
·
546 Posts
What, and grease won't attract contaminants???
The point was intended for those who think no grease is required. Sorry for the poor communicative skills.

Never said that it wouldn't work...... it's just a waste and may even interfere with a good connection, electrically.
The grease may interfere with loose initial connections that already require attention. But if the connections are sound, they will no longer oxidize/corrode, and likely not do so in the future. It is DESIGNED for this purpose.

I think we both agree it should be used, we just see the application slightly differently. The important thing, is that andrewgiambrone has an answer to his "what should I do" question.

Good luck andrewgiambrone
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top