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What's an average cost of a replacement? I've already got the stator and new r/r. I have an average skill level when it comes to working on bikes, and not a lot of time to do it. Is it worth it to bite the bullet and have a mechanic do it?
 

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I've done 2 stator replacements myself so no cost other than materials. It's a good day's work by the time you drain the radiator, pull the exhaust, unbolt everything that needs unbolted to pull the engine out of the frame. After that it's only about 15 minutes to replace the stator. Then you have to put it all together again. I think it's a good way to learn about the bike and how things work and go together. Not really for the weak of heart though. Good luck!
 
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It's an awesome way to learn everything about your bike, but a horrible way to learn what not to do because if you screw it up..... EVERYTHING comes back out. I mean EVERYTHING. SO, what can go wrong? Well.......

You have to remove the entire engine and everything related to it. So...... everything. This is not just a starter replacement. There are so many ways to go wrong that you must consider the scale of items you will be removing and reinstalling CORRECTLY. Some of these bolts, like the radiator bolts may be corroded and snap.... now what are you going to do? Can you drill and tap a new bolt? Are you able to do that in the middle of everything else there is to do? Are you prepared to curse and bleed trying to get the snorkels back on the carbs.... cause that.... oh thats fun. There is a large airbox sitting on the engine that must go back in at the right time or...... yeah the engine is coming back out. All that stuff surrounding the engine like the overflow tank, radiator, air cleaners, snorkels, airbag, wiring..... all has to come out AND go back in correctly and there is an order to it. You'll find that out real quick if you do something out of order. When doing the stator you can do it wrong. If you happen to goof it up, the engine comes back out. The stator itself is not a big deal, but the pickups must be right and SHOULD be modified while you're in there. The wiring for the stator only goes one way.... if you don't put it back how you found it you'll melt and short the stator.

But what about the things that are more fun..... the driveshaft coupler cover is rubber, no big deal... comes off, goes on..... but can you get the driveshaft splines lined up trying to balance the engine when you can't see into the coupler because you're at the front holding and guiding the engine and the coupler is facing against you hiding the splines? Sure, several of us have done it, but it's just one of those things you'll find out when you're in there. Those things are........ this bike is a PITA to work on and everything is designed to be hard.

If you take good notes and pay attention to everything and the order it's done, you can do it. If you skip some little simple things like not sticking the airbox back on the engine before you bolt it in..... do a search for how many people have tried and failed to squeeze it back into the frame.

It's not my choice for a first go at trying to work on my bike. I'd do the rear end splines, maybe some pickup mods or other electrical stuff.... change a starter.... but the stator on this bike..... nope. Not for my first go at working on it. If you can weld however..... it gets MUUUCCHHHH easier. 2 hour job. :)

https://www.vn750.com/forum/19-electrical/100298-installing-stator-frame-cut-method.html

I wouldn't recommend anyone who isn't a badass welder even try it. Too much needs to be right or things will go wrong. This is not a shortcut. It's just another way for the capable. I have certifications in mig, stick, tig, and oxy and I STILL used a highway bar as a backup brace.
 
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