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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

After ignoring all the advice I received about doing the tuxedo stator mod while the engine was out, the inevitable has happened.

For whatever reason, I figured I'd be impervious to a stator failure. I was wrong. Although the stator tested fine and the voltage was correct then the bike was fired up, it was not OK.

Once the bike warmed up the voltage dropped significantly, and could not charge the bike sufficiently. I'm assuming It's grounding out when hot, I have yet to confirm this with ohm measurements.

Anyhow, I'm looking at an engine pull to replace the stator. (Possibility of a new video to document the procedure :smiley_th)

I'm also considering mods that will prolong the life of the stator.

Either an oil cooling system, or a stator oil bath mod. Maybe a combination of both.

The oil cooling system would use an oil filter adapter and a frame mounted oil cooler. The system would probably cost around $400.00.

I'm having a hard time justifying a cost like that if the stator only fails so often, and is easily serviced with the cover mod.

What do you guys think?
 

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1986 VN750
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From everything I have read, moving to a MOSFET regulator can greatly improve stator life.

Also, get your stator rewound from Tim Parrot as the quality of work is much better than even OEM. I am really happy with mine! My battery was 13.06v after my 2 hour ride yesterday. The stator case modification is totally worth it, saved me a ton of time. I can swap a stator in under an hour if the gasket is working with me now. If you can come up with a way to keep that stator from going out in the first place, that would be awesome. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
From everything I have read, moving to a MOSFET regulator can greatly improve stator life.

Also, get your stator rewound from Tim Parrot as the quality of work is much better than even OEM. I am really happy with mine! My battery was 13.06v after my 2 hour ride yesterday. The stator case modification is totally worth it, saved me a ton of time. I can swap a stator in under an hour if the gasket is working with me now. If you can come up with a way to keep that stator from going out in the first place, that would be awesome. ;)
I have the Mosfet, and I will get Tim to re-wind mine.

I'm just brainstorming failure prevention right now.

I've dug up a bunch of old post with lots of ideas. I just need to weigh the logistics and costs of these mods.
 

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1986 VN750
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Out of curiosity, what kind of R/R was it, was it new, and how long did it last?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's a Shindengen MOSFET R/R. It's practically brand new, I'm assuming it's still good.
 

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Other than keeping all your electrical connections clean and solid, the only factor that seems to have an effect on stator life is oil level. Not alot of data here, but it is generally believed keeping the engine oil level at the very top of the sight glass is good prevention.
 

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Other than keeping all your electrical connections clean and solid, the only factor that seems to have an effect on stator life is oil level. Not alot of data here, but it is generally believed keeping the engine oil level at the very top of the sight glass is good prevention.
^ x2 ^

Diagnose and repair anything that makes the engine run hotter than normal.

Not sure if a MOSFET R/R helps with stator life. It is still a ground shorting type regulator. It just doesn't use a bi-polar resistive junction to do it.

~~C8>
 

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Sparky!!!
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as for cooling the stator.. some one made an oil injection system by tapping into the already used chrome oil line and running another line into the stator cover... can't remember who it was. GORDON... do you have it book marked by any chance?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
as for cooling the stator.. some one made an oil injection system by tapping into the already used chrome oil line and running another line into the stator cover... can't remember who it was. GORDON... do you have it book marked by any chance?
Yeah, I've looked that thread over. It's really neat.
The Thread
The Pictures

Edit: I just realized this thread probably should have been under Electrical.
 

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1986 VN750
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It's a Shindengen MOSFET R/R. It's practically brand new, I'm assuming it's still good.
I meant what brand stator, not R/R. My bad ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I meant what brand stator, not R/R. My bad ;)
I'm assuming it's stock. The bike has about 14,000km on it.

cglennon said:
What about a FLO permanent oil filter (approx $94). It has oil cooling capabilities, filters better than a paper element, and is reusable. Popular with racers and HD. Also,available for the VN750.
That's an interesting idea. Do you think you could expect quite a bit more cooling than what a stock or oversized filter would provide?
 

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Drive less, ride more...
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I don't think you can really talk about stator failure prevention without talking about keeping electrical connections clean and tight.

As KM has eluded to above, I think that a large portion of the stator failures on this forum are due to the fact that the electrical connectors on these bikes have largely been neglected and left to corrode for the life of each bike. Especially on older model VN750s, this neglect comes home to haunt with subsequent bike owners.

I'm sure you've heard the saying that "an ounce of prevention is worth a ton of cure" and I feel reasonably confident that at least an annual inspection of the bike's electrics as explained in the following "Verses" thread (and especially to include the multi-pin connection at the bike's regulator/rectifier) could help a lot of us avoid (or at least further postpone) a stator swapout:

http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1104

and for that matter, the following thread includes a dwg that explains part of our problem here:

http://www.ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/press-faulty-connectors.php

For what it's worth--I've used dielectric grease now on my VN750 electrical connections for over 25,000 miles, without any hiccups or problems. I think it could be argued that dielectric grease is one of your electrical system's best friends!

Stator failure is also of course a function of the bike's age (hey, nothin' lasts forever, right?) and also how often the oil has been changed and how well the oil level has been maintained (or not).

Something else to perhaps consider--this Vulcan is really designed as an "open road" bike--so spending a lot of time in stop-n-go traffic does not do stator life any good.

Yet another factor contributing to stator problems is weak and/or neglected batteries. A battery that is "going south" is basically a big resistor for the stator to overcome. Thus a stout, healthy battery (like one of the newer AGMs) that is maintained (e.g., with clean and tight terminal connections) and kept on a "smart" charger when not in use can help a lot with stator life, too.

One thing to watch for that I've noticed on other Vulcan 750s, regarding the 3 stator wire connectors that are just behind the bike's left side cover. These wires (and their connectors) can become too hot simply from the heat coming from the exhaust pipe and manifold right in front of them.

These connectors should be routinely inspected for excess heat and any damage or melting. Inspect the bike's frame adjacent to these connectors, to see if the frame is getting too hot from exhaust/engine heat, and then melting the connectors, or any of these 3 yellow wires.

Finally--I also think another contributing factor to this problem is that most of these bikes spend the vast majority of their lives parked outside, uncovered--or at least left partially exposed to the elements (as opposed to stored inside a completely enclosed structure, where moisture is mostly burned away by daytime heating). This of course makes it that much easier for rust/corrosion to set up on inconspicuous places amongst the electrical connectors. Then...left uninspected to progress over time, the charging system thus ends up in something of a "self destruct" mode.

Having said all that, this is obviously an excellent thread and the previous post suggestions above include good ideas. It would be neat if we could somehow find out how much oil cooling a spin-on, "permanent" oil filter system would reasonably produce.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I don't think you can really talk about stator failure prevention without talking about keeping electrical connections clean and tight.
I completely agree.

For what it's worth--I've used dielectric grease now on my VN750 electrical connections for over 25,000 miles, without any hiccups or problems. I think it could be argued that dielectric grease is one of your electrical system's best friends!
The reason you use dielectric grease is just to keep contaminants and water out of the connections, correct?

I'm asking because dielectric grease in non-conductive, so it won't make the connection "better" just less likely to corrode.

As far as making a better connection, as in the stator leads for example, soldering the terminals would be the way to go.

Stator failure is also of course a function of the bike's age (hey, nothin' lasts forever, right?) and also how often the oil has been changed and how well the oil level has been maintained (or not).
Right. Age is a factor you can not control.

Factors I can control would be, oil level, oil temp, oil contamination, and electrical system efficiency.

The more I read about this issue in past posts, the more I get the feeling like oil temp plays a significant role in cooking these stators.

Something else to perhaps consider--this Vulcan is really designed as an "open road" bike--so spending a lot of time in stop-n-go traffic does not do stator life any good.
Herein lies my problem. I'd like to use the bike as a commuter, as well as an open rode bike. I feel like an oil cooling system my be my best bet in this scenario.

One thing to watch for that I've noticed on other Vulcan 750s, regarding the 3 stator wire connectors that are just behind the bike's left side cover. These wires (and their connectors) can become too hot simply from the heat coming from the exhaust pipe and manifold right in front of them.

These connectors should be routinely inspected for excess heat and any damage or melting. Inspect the bike's frame adjacent to these connectors, to see if the frame is getting too hot from exhaust/engine heat, and then melting the connectors, or any of these 3 yellow wires.
I'll try to address this on the new stator install. Previously I had soldered the terminals on each lead, and heat shrink wrapped each wire, and then the bundle. Maybe I'll throw a wire loom over them for a little more heat protection.


Having said all that, this is obviously an excellent thread and the previous post suggestions above include good ideas. It would be neat if we could somehow find out how much oil cooling a spin-on, "permanent" oil filter system would reasonably produce.
I agree, thanks for your insight.
 

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I would say re-wiring the charging system and installing a MOSFET directly wired to the battery is the way to go. Replace the stator wires while your at it...direct to the R/R. Keep the oil fresh and topped off. That's about all you can do..........
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would say re-wiring the charging system and installing a MOSFET directly wired to the battery is the way to go. Replace the stator wires while your at it...direct to the R/R. Keep the oil fresh and topped off. That's about all you can do..........
I think I will do this.

Right now the R/R is wired directly to the battery. I would just need to run new wires from the stator to the R/R.

Is there any need to place a Shindengen R/R on a relay? I know there is a bit of draw when the bike is off, but if it's being used regularly, I'm thinking it shouldn't be a problem.
 

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I think I will do this.

Right now the R/R is wired directly to the battery. I would just need to run new wires from the stator to the R/R.

Is there any need to place a Shindengen R/R on a relay? I know there is a bit of draw when the bike is off, but if it's being used regularly, I'm thinking it shouldn't be a problem.
No relay needed. In fact, the less you have between the R/R and the battery the better. 1 pos. 1 neg. wire...... Fat and short.....
Ditto on the stator wires...
 

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Roach--the following is basically a direct quote right off of one of the first pages in the electrical section of the Clymer manual for this bike:

"When attaching electrical connectors, pack them with a dielectric grease compound. Dielectric grease is especially formulated for sealing and waterproofing electrical connectors and will not interfere with the current flow through the electrical connectors. Use only this compound or an equivalent designed for this specific purpose. Do not use a substitute that may interfere with the current flow within the electrical connector. Do not use silicone sealant."

My experience with dielectric grease suggests that the above info is the truth.

Also: a MOSFET type regulator/rectifier may indeed help partially solve this problem, and buy the stator some additional life. But that doesn't mean that the charging system's electrical connectors shouldn't be periodically inspected, cleaned, and packed/covered/sealed with grease as appropriate.
 

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Easy decision I think Roach....
The Parrot rebuild will likely last longer than the bike.

Far be it for me to give you further advice....after your rebuild and supporting videos, I defer to you for anything regarding these bikes.
Your contribution to this forum is top notch! :beerchug:
 
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