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Discussion Starter #1
Having read many posts about the factory not lubing the splines properly raises a question in my mind. I just wonder how many owners of a new VN-750 actually had the splines lubed at the 6000 mile scheduled interval? And how many actually lubed them every 12,000 miles after that? My 2002 VN-750had close to 10,000 miles on it when I got it, and the previous owner stated that he had never had the splines lubed. Dummy me, a few months back I thought that the shaft drive would be relatively maintenance free like shaft drive on a car?
 

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Old Truck Junkie
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Drive lines even on some trucks (18 wheelers) have sealed u-joints. however, this joints also wear out and need replacing. They do last for many miles. The drive line on this bike will last for a lot of miles with just one lubing. IMO many riders on this forum do the lube on the drive line too often. Those that do that is. It is best to do it than not to lube it at all as others do. Again this is MO. So it is relatively maintenance free.
 

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Prowling Tiger
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Having read many posts about the factory not lubing the splines properly raises a question in my mind. I just wonder how many owners of a new VN-750 actually had the splines lubed at the 6000 mile scheduled interval? And how many actually lubed them every 12,000 miles after that? My 2002 VN-750had close to 10,000 miles on it when I got it, and the previous owner stated that he had never had the splines lubed. Dummy me, a few months back I thought that the shaft drive would be relatively maintenance free like shaft drive on a car?
That 6,000 mile scheduled maintenance is only for the u-joint. Nothing else on the drive-shaft. The next scheduled interval is 36,000 miles. Nothing in my bike manual or the downloaded manual even suggests lubing the splines. Even the local mechanics in my area have never heard of a VN750 drive shaft fail. That's why I was so reluctant in doing mine because I had the warranty which would cover the failed part. Fortunately, when mine did fail, M_Angell had a spare used one I traded for. Splines are lubed now!

Also keep in mind, a driveshaft on a bike will outlast a chain or belt resulting in less maintenance and money. The VN900C I had for a short time was belt driven. I considered buying a new belt for it until I found out it was gonna cost me upwards of $500+ for a new one! I thought the drive belts were much like serpentine belts. I guess not, LOL.
 

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Prowling Tiger
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Silly me, I thought that the female splines were part of the drive shaft?
OH! What a stupid way to word things! When the book talks about the propeller shaft joint, I assumed the u-joint. I never would have imagined the coupler being called a "sliding joint". *facepalm*

Even then, if the joint was lubricated @ 6,000 miles, the lube should last until 36,000 miles before needing maintenance. That's a long time since most of these smaller bikes get passed around so often with high years and low miles.
 

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Old Truck Junkie
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The u-joint has no grease fitting. It is a sealed unit. And it last many miles with the original lube. And the slip joint is part of the drive line.
 

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Silly me, I thought that the female splines were part of the drive shaft?
They are, female splines on both ends of the driveshaft.

Mine looked like they'd never been greased, but clean and dry with no rust. I can tell this bike was not left outside overnight or in the rain much. When moisture is allowed to permeate every crack and crevice, I think that's when the trouble begins in the splines with no grease. Rust takes hold and further riding does the damage.

People leave bikes and mowers out in the weather and it rusts everything down to it's core. Cables, wiring, contacts, machined surfaces, all go to hell in no time with repeated moisture cycles. Rain and dew are the two worst culprits.

I would also bet that a hot driveshaft can sweat, just like a hot tailpipe.

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Old Truck Junkie
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The splines at the front end of the drive shaft have minimal movement and a coat of oil will keep rust from building up. I don't mess with those.
 

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OH! What a stupid way to word things! When the book talks about the propeller shaft joint, I assumed the u-joint. I never would have imagined the coupler being called a "sliding joint". *facepalm*

Even then, if the joint was lubricated @ 6,000 miles, the lube should last until 36,000 miles before needing maintenance. That's a long time since most of these smaller bikes get passed around so often with high years and low miles.
Probably some of the same thoughts or miss-interpretations the shop guys have!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Schedule maintenance, splines!

Talked to a dude at the Factory customer service. And he said the first one at 4000 miles and the next one at 24,000 miles, and every 20,000 miles there after. Claims he got it from the factory service manual. But I personally think the guy was screwing goobers!
 

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Bearcat
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Factory scheduled maintince out of a service manual is a good point of reference. But it's just that, when the manufacture thinks the bike needs a little tlc. In reality a good maintaince scedual depends on a variety of factors. If its a new to me bike, or anything for that matter, I like to pull everything apart and check it for my self. This accomplished to things, I get filmiluar with my machine and I know everything is right. As to when to recheck everything, to me it makes since to take a little extra time to make sure everything's still in good shape and relube. Anytime you have to take a section of the bike apart. IMO that means lubing the splines every time I put a new tire on the rear:) roughly 10k miles. It just makes since to me to take the time while she's down to do the little things that most overlook till its to late. An ounce of prevention goes a long ways.
 

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Sparky!!!
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Talked to a dude at the Factory customer service. And he said the first one at 4000 miles and the next one at 24,000 miles, and every 20,000 miles there after. Claims he got it from the factory service manual. But I personally think the guy was screwing goobers!
I found the same numbers straight out of the Kawasaki Service Manual Page 1-8 and in the Service Manual Chapter 10-16 talks about exactly how to do the spline lube, and the VN750 Owners Manual says to lube the splines at 10,000 miles then every 20,000 after. The Clymers manual also says 4000 and every 20k there after.

have you downloaded the manuals? do you have any kind of repair manual other than VN750.com? You might want to take the time and get the manual, I have the Clymer, Factory Kawasaki Service Manual, and The Chilton's. I use all three every time I work on my bike. I find the Clymer easiest to use, but nothing beats the wiring diagrams of the Chilton's, and the Factory Service manual has the best description of each part and how it goes back together.

before you go knocking people, take the time to read stuff your self.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Spline lube schedule

Factory scheduled maintince out of a service manual is a good point of reference. But it's just that, when the manufacture thinks the bike needs a little tlc. In reality a good maintaince scedual depends on a variety of factors. If its a new to me bike, or anything for that matter, I like to pull everything apart and check it for my self. This accomplished to things, I get filmiluar with my machine and I know everything is right. As to when to recheck everything, to me it makes since to take a little extra time to make sure everything's still in good shape and relube. Anytime you have to take a section of the bike apart. IMO that means lubing the splines every time I put a new tire on the rear:) roughly 10k miles. It just makes since to me to take the time while she's down to do the little things that most overlook till its to late. An ounce of prevention goes a long ways.
Excellent point about doing it when you change out a tire. That really makes sense. Not that much more to take the four bolts out and pull the final drive. RE: manual, I just yesterday received a Clymer manual compliments of the previous owner. I am going to have the dealer do it this time, (agreed to by them when purchasing the bike) and have them install a new tire when doing the job.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Free repair

The dealer just called stating that the splines were worn on the final dive and that they would replace it and lube everything up at no charge.
 

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Chasin' the blacktop
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Sounds like you've got a good dealer. Driveshafts are fairly pricy.
 

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Prowling Tiger
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Sounds like you've got a good dealer. Driveshafts are fairly pricy.
Nope; but the final drive is! $200 for the DS and $972 for the Final Drive add another $74 for a new coupler. The drive shaft splines almost never break, it's the splines on the FD and coupler that do.
 
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