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Discussion Starter #1
When I first brought the bike and found this group I felt I had to lube the spline...and right away! Spline had lube (Whew) but i felt good to relube. I used hi moly engine assembly lube since I could not find the recommended moly paste at that time. Does anyone have experience with engine assembly lube... It was thick enough and has a high moly content..Any thoughts?:confused:
 

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Young Gun
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I'm sure that a more seasoned member will chime in on this. In the research I did before doing the spline lube, I found that the high moly content was the most important. Not everybody uses the Honda Moly-60 that is often mentioned
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Is there a moly % listed on the package?

I agree that any high moly grease will do the job. I think Honda Moly 60 is just one of the most widely available and recognizeable brands around. About a year ago someone posted some other greases that are even better than Moly 60, created for heavy industrial use in the oil patch etc. They are harder to find, more expensive and not really neccesary for the Vulcan. If I had access to it at work though, I wouldn`t hesitate to put a few ounces in a ziplock bag and try it out at the next spline lube.
 

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I did some research on a high temperature moly grease that another member used in another thread, but I couldn't find how much moly it contained. So I'm left wondering how much protection it actually provides compared to Moly 60 and other high moly greases.

Others have suggested CV joint grease as a substitute because it lubricates joints that operate under pressure and high temperature. But CV joint grease is contained within a boot, can't go anywhere, and comparatively there is a lot of grease in the boot. There isn't room for a huge amount of grease in the VN750 driveshaft coupling, the natural action of the shaft in the coupling tends to push the grease away from where it needs to be, and pressures and temps are high. So I'm left wondering "How much moly is required to provide minimal protection for my bike's driveshaft?" I'm more frugal than most, and don't like to spend money I don't have to. However, I used Guard Dog Moly with around 73% moly on my splines. As OlHoss said, it isn't cheap. But compared to being stranded in the middle of nowhere with bad splines and final drive, it's well worth the investment to me.

I currently have over 10,000 miles on my tires and the back looks good for several thousand more. So, do I go ahead and pull the tire, relube, and pull it again in a few months to replace the tire? Based upon the higher moly content of the grease I used, think I'll wait until the tire needs replacing.
 

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Based on what I've seen when re-lubing my splines, considering the first time was at about 9K and the last was around 27K, both the follow-up times there was gobs of moly still in the joint after 8-10K miles, and while I don't recommend anyone do this, I wouldn't feel threatened going 20K miles between lubes. I wouldn't do it, but I believe that the protection is there once you do it right that would allow many more miles between spline lubes than what is recommended.
So would I wait a few thousand miles for my rear tire to wear enough to replace it and do the spline lube? Sure, as long as I'd done the previous spline lube and knew it was in good shape. On a "new to me" bike that I didn't know the history of, that had a few thousand miles left on the rear tire, would I wait? Most of you know my spline history... No, I wouldn't wait!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sadly I used up the last of the assembly lube on the spline lube and threw the tube away so I dont know the moly content. Since things looked in good shape when I lubed I think I am ok with a fer thousand more miles before I recheck--then I will get some of the suggested products mentioned on the boards--- Which product seems to have the most "staying power" not slinging out of the joint over time?
 

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1985 VN-700
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Unknowingly about the moly thing I actually used marine grade grease 7 yrs and 10,000 miles ago. I pulled it down yesterday and it was still well lubed. Manual says high temperature grease which I think is most wheel bearing style greases.
 

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The major difference in regular hi-temp grease and moly is how the moly bonds to the metal on both the coupling and the final drive splines and forms a layer that prevents the metal parts from wearing against each other.
High temperature is a relative term. It can mean a lot of things depending on the conversation. Axle grease is a high temperature lubricant comparatively speaking. But Honda Moly 60 is a much higher temperature grease than plain axle grease, plus the bonding and protection properties it has over conventional grease make it that much better.

Most of us can agree that Honda makes a quality motorcycle. You pay more for the Honda line of bikes than you will for the Vulcan. I'm not slamming Kawasaki by saying this, as we all can agree that Kawasaki gives you an awful lot of bike for the money, probably more than any other manufacturer. More smiles for the miles, I like to say. But do they get a little skimpy on some parts? Probably, with the idea that most of those parts will still outlast the bike and save cost. So in areas that are skimpy on the KAW, can we go with something better that might help our bikes last longer? Why not?

Some (any) grease is better than no grease though, but I just feel like the Moly 60 is worth the little extra money it costs in this case.
 

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I'm not 100% sure on this but, as memory serves me, the grease rating is SLG#2 in the Clymer book. If you must use a standard HiTemp grease, repack asap when you find the 60% moly. I used wheel bearing / disk brake grease w/moly last year and will be repacking with Honda Moly next week (only have a couple thousand miles on the grease).

DT
 

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I got around to lubing my rear splines this past week. 5500 miles on my '04. There was evidence of wear showing already on the torque side of the spline teeth and in the coupling. A little rolling over of the metal. I was surprised to see that at this low mileage. I used the Honda Moly 60 grease, but did not "pack" the joint. Just a generous coating of of both the male and female spline teeth. Should I be concerned already at this point?

BTW, bought it used in June '10 with 5300 miles on it.
 

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I guess it would depend on how rolled the edges were. If just the slightest rolling of the edges, I would feel pretty good that you got it done, and make a mental picture of it, so you can compare it with the next time you do the spline lube. I imagine you are fine, now that you know it is lubed!
 

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Mine were dry as a bone and had almost 7,000 miles before I lubed them. Apparently, the POs were easy on the throttle because when I got the splines clean they looked almost pristine.
 

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I almost wish I hadn't seen them. Now that I know there is at least some wear, I'll think about it constantly. But on the other hand, hopefully I have plenty of time to keep my eye open for a good deal on a coupling and final drive. Just in case...

But, 5500 miles and worn at all? Seems like undersized engineering to me.
 

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"Knowing" (from all the horror stories here) that I already had spline damage, I picked up a good used shaft on ebay before I even checked the splines. Yeah, paranoid thinking. So now I have an extra I'll never need!

Don't worry about it. With the proper lube, you should be able to go at least 10,000 miles (or rear tire change) till it's time for the next lube. Look at them then and see if they've worn any. Probably won't be much, if any.
 
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