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I've sold my 93' VN750. This my sin. I traded it for a 98' VN750. I am very sorry if I've offended any VN750 owners with my actions.
I just couldn't resist it. The 98' VN750 has half the mileages, five years newer. All around, health no problems. I did have some minor issues with 93' VN750 like, very very slow oil leak, stiff steering, metallic sound (metal-to-metal) right under my crouch. Great points were and are, always started, never quits on me, great MPG, the ability to get our of the way when needed, smooth riding.
I guess when it comes to the VN 750, I'm a male cougar.
Oh dear God help me,....to be strong if I ever come across a 2004 or 2006 VN750 for sale.
Give me the strength to ride right passed it and not cave into yet another upgrade.
Just in case some of you missed the point of my rant. "I LOVE THE VULCAN 750" and all other VN750's where ever they are.
Ray
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I traded my '93 Vulcan 750 for am '01 KLR650. It was not a good match, and less than a year later, I traded my KLR for a new '02 Vulcan 750. I then bought a used H-D, and sold the Vulcan, only to buy it back less than a year later (the buyer contacted me and asked if I would be interested in buying it back at a really low price)

The '93 had 80,000+ miles on it when I traded it, and the ONLY problem I ever had with it was a rear carb flooding within the first couple months after I bought it. I thought it over, and decided I didn't want no dealer messing with my bike, so I fixed it myself. Other than that, nothing. It still had it's original cam chain tensioners when I traded it.

The '02 has had a few problems, but nothing serious. The main issue was the cam chain tensioners failed at about 23,000 miles, I replaced them with stock ones, that failed 10,000 miles later. I learned my lesson and went with TOC manual tensioners. No problems so far at 70,000+. I had the lock fall off the tool box door before I got a chance to lock-tite it, I already knew the door was unusable. Dealer replaced it. Also had a swingarm cap fall off, and had the wiring connections between the stator and R/R burn.

I think the quality of the Vulcan 750 deteriorated over the years because the tooling started wearing out, and Kawasaki didn't want to spend anything to keep it going that wasn't absolutely necessary. They made this bike for 22 years, and never showed any interest in correcting any of it's well known flaws, not even that cheesy toolbox door.

They came out with the tour pack, which I was interested in, but the prices were absurd. Apparently most everybody else thought so too, as they seem to have wound up almost giving most of it away.

The main things I like about this bike are first, second, and third, it's comfort. It is perfect for me, and I can ride it all day without pain. Can't say that about any other bike I've ever owned other than an '85 Goldwing. I love it's looks, it's handling, and it's great throttle response. I like the fact that it has a lot of actually usable features, like shaft drive, a centerstand, cast wheels with tubeless tires, hydraulic valves, a spin on oil filter, full instrumentation, on the bars, leaving room for a tank bag, 4 way flashers, fuel gauge, and even the fact that it has a drum rear brake. A bike this size does not need a complicated disc. All of these things make it much more suitable for a touring bike than many other cruisers in it's size range, and that is exactly what I use it for. Thats how I managed to put so many miles on it.

Unfortunately one thing I do not like about it is that it is not rebuidable, at least not if it is pretty much completely worn out, it would require replacing most of the engine. So when mine does wear out (hopefully with well over 100,000 miles on it) there is no satisfactory replacement for it. The Japanese no longer make any cruiser that I would care to buy, and they have raised their prices so much I couldn't afford it if they did.


Enjoy your Vulcan 750. When it's gone, their won't be any more. Knowing all it's potential problems, I would not invest in a used one. You might get lucky, you might just be throwing your money away. The Vulcan 750 needs more maintenance than it might seem, and it needs it from day one. It also does not seem to take abuse very well, I'm wondering if many of the problems people have with them are caused by abuse.
 

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Straight roads are evil
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The main things I like about this bike are first, second, and third, its comfort. It is perfect for me, and I can ride it all day without pain. Can't say that about any other bike I've ever owned other than an '85 Goldwing. I love its looks, its handling, and its great throttle response. I like the fact that it has a lot of actually usable features, like shaft drive, a centerstand, cast wheels with tubeless tires, hydraulic valves, a spin on oil filter, full instrumentation, on the bars, leaving room for a tank bag, 4 way flashers, fuel gauge, and even the fact that it has a drum rear brake. A bike this size does not need a complicated disc. All of these things make it much more suitable for a touring bike than many other cruisers in it's size range, and that is exactly what I use it for. Thats how I managed to put so many miles on it.
Well said, Jerry. What I liked most about my Vulcan was that it would do anything. I spent most of the time on beyond-ultra-twisty hardcore goat trails, and the Vulcan ate them up and begged for more. It can do so much more than blast down the freeway. I even took it on dirt (easy dirt, but dirt).

Still miss the old girl. Riding a Suzuki Vstrom 650 now, and objectively, the strom is a better bike in every way. But it was so much fun on the Vulcan, hanging out with the sportsbike crowd, having them wonder how a cruiser was keeping up through the twisties. Ahh, such sweet memories. Put 60k+ of hard roads on her, and other than the stator crapping out a few times, had few other problems. Overall, the VN750 just works.
 

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Let's Ride!!
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But it was so much fun on the Vulcan, hanging out with the sportsbike crowd, having them wonder how a cruiser was keeping up through the twisties.
I love that feeling. Have been on a few group rides with mostly sportbike riders and get a lot of people saying they are impressed that I'm keeping up. I try to be modest and just thank them politely for the complement, but on the inside I'm always glowing a bit. I love railing the big thing through the twisty bits, and I love the guys on the little crotch rockets being surprised that a cruiser can be ridden like that.
 

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I guess I'd say you got yourself a "trophy" Vulcan!
 

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I want mine back bad. Maybe I'll get this new chick into it enough to get her own. I just got her a t-shirt that says "Good girl gone biker." She loves it.

I miss the 750 in those deep turns...
 
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