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Discussion Starter #1
How many of you use a torque wrench? Do I absolutely need to torque to specified value?

I'm trying to decide if I should get a torque wrench for my stator replacement project.

Thanks,
Luis Pereira
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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Alot of the parts store around here will rent tools.
But if that's not an option for ya, and you don't know someone to borrow one from, it would be a good idea to have one.
Some nuts and bolts are 'good enough' to be tightened by feel, but when gaskets and easily stripped bolt holes are in the equation, use a torque wrench. You'll be glad ya did when ya don't see oil leaking !!
 

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I second that, particular for bolts/nuts that need a significant torque (like the rear axle nut). You don't have to pay a lot for one, and I use mine all the time.
 

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Stranger Than Fiction
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I used a torque wrench on all my nuts and bolts on my rebuild. I get a "warmer fuzzier feeling" knowing they are torqued to specs than my guessing..........
 

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Some of the torque specs in the clutch replacement procedure are VERY light... I wound up repeating some bolts because it didn't seem "natural". So I did it to spec, and nothing stripped and nothing leaks, and I don't worry about it. Get the wrench. Hey, it's a tool any you need it!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How to pick a good torque wrench

Thanks for the feedback guys!

I hit the web to do a little reading up on torque wrenches but all it did was fill my head with doubts and confusion. I don't wanna take out a bank loan to buy a tool. On the other hand I don't believe in disposable tools either.

What make/model/size you guys using ? I just don't know how to make a smart torque wrench purchase . I figure you're all more experienced at this than I; both you and your bikes are still around to tell the tale so it must be a good enough torque wrench.

Thanks,
Luis Pereira
 

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I have a 1/4" 3/8" & 1/2" torque wrenches with the twisting/micrometer handles for setting torque specs from Matco Tools from when I was a mechanic. I needed them almost everyday so I spent the $ on them. You don't need anything that fancy though. I would not spend any money on those cheap $20.00 torque wrenches with a needle that points to the torque value down by the handle, they are not that accurate. Get a good one from Sears or another good tool manufacturer.

Here's a pretty good deal for a 1/4" torque wrench on E-bay that is similar to mine-

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/AUTO-MOTOCYCLE-ENGINE-1-4-MICROMETER-TORQUE-WRENCH_W0QQitemZ230146182247QQihZ013QQcategoryZ43993QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
 

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I bought a Craftsman model 44596 (on sale at $99.99US until 6/30). It covers 80 ft-lbs to less than 8 ft-lbs, and it's covered everything I needed for a spline lube and a clutch replacement. The 80ft-lbs is important.... that's the rear axle nut spec. There are some higher torque requirements - the clutch basket nut spec is 98 ft-lbs. Some are very low; the clutch spring torque spec in my manual shows 6.5 ft-lbs. In the technical forum (the Vulcan Verses) there's a listing of some specs.

I'm pleased with the quality - it's not a commercial grade tool, but they say the tool is 3% accurate which is plenty for me.
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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While on the torque wrench subject, here's some FYI that may be of some help if ya don't already know it.....

1 ft-lb = 12 in-lb's

and

12 in-lbs = 1 ft-lb



So, if something requires 65 in-lbs, and all you have is a (low) ft-lb wrench, divide 65 by 12 to get about 5.4 ft-lbs

and just reverse if you have an in-lb wrench, but are only given ft-lb values....

5.4 times 12 gives ya 64.8 in-lbs
 

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Discussion Starter #12
still hunting

Thanks for the replies guys :smiley_th

I'm still hunting for a torque wrench, preferably just one with the range I'll be using most. But now I've come up with an idea: use a regular wrench but push on it with a bathroom scale...

the search goes on
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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But now I've come up with an idea: use a regular wrench but push on it with a bathroom scale...

the search goes on
LOL !!
And seeing as you stand on a bathroom scale, I'd guess that it would be foot pounds?! LOL
 

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Some advice from someone (AF Metrology/Calibration Technician) who used to calibrate and repair torque wrenches.
Torque wrenches are not rated in the lower 20% of their range. I.E. 200 lb ft torque wrench is only certifiable from 40-200 lb ft.
Good dial indicating torque wrenches are accurate for 2% of reading if calibrated and used correctly.
Dropping a torque wrench or storing it on a setting higher than the lowest reading will make all further readings suspect. Pivot points can be misaligned and springs can be compressed when under tension.
Craftsman and Snap-on are two of the more reliable brands.
 

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Torque wrenches are well worth it.You can use them on all kinds of things that require torque values.In some cases an inch /pound torque wrench is used instead of ft/lbs.In any case its a good tool to have. Good Luck......................
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Finally got me a torque wrench...screwed up already!

I got myself two torque wrenches today, a 1/4Inch 20-200 inch-lbs and a 3/8Inch 120-960 inch-lbs, from a place called Princess Auto out by where I live.
The instructions say to "warm" it up first by torquing something at a low torque value a few times just to get the internal lube going.

Great, I thought, I'll test the 1/4 inch wrench by torquing an engine coolant drain plug which calls for 78 in-lb. So I set the wrench, locked it, and started to wrench away...and wrench...and wrench...and I was thinking to myself "its supposed to click and let me know when I've reached 78 in-lb" it didn't click so I continued to wrench.

Guess what happened ? I wound up breaking off the head of the bolt. Now I got the threaded bit deep inside the hole. &$#!

NOTES TO SELF: Never assume the tool is infallible and never test on a part of the engine.
 

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Yeah--you never want to try an unknown torque wrench on your rides!
If you have a vice or know someone with one get several size bolts and nuts-metric or sae, it does not matter. Put the nuts on the bolts and tighten them up finger tight. Place them in the vice and tighten the vice down only on the nut--not the bolt head. If you don't have access to a vice find something that has bolts in it that you don't need or care about and use it. Set your torque wrench and tighten the bolt until it clicks. NOTE: If it never clicks and the bolt breaks--you suceesfully passed in-lbs and most likely blew past ft-lbs Set the torque wrench to another higher setting and with a little more effort it should click again so on and so forth. Do this with several size bolts and both torque wrenches. Since you have a 1/4" 20-200 in-lbs and a 3/8 120-960 in-lbs you will be able to compare both wrenches after 120 in-lbs. You will also get aquainted and use to the required strength/force needed for various in-lbs settings.
One main thing to remember about tourqe settings is
A) in-lbs requires very little effort to tighten
B) ft-lbs requires some effort or strength
This is also very very relavent to the wrench you are using and also the size bolt.
I.E.--200 in-lbs on a 1/4 wrench will require more effort to attain than when using a 3/8 wrench (3/8 wrench provides more leverage and less effort)
Another thing to be very aware of is that even though these claim to be "clicking" torque wrenches they will not actually "click" all the time on very low torque settings. You will actually barely feel the "give/movement" in the wrench when it obtains the torque setting (the wrench actually quits tightening but the wrench/handle moves just slightly) and at that point is where it would normally click. If you are not use to this "feel" in the torque wrench it's very very easy to blast past it and keep on tightening. They won't actually click until you get to higher torque settings.
Hope this helps you avoid more problems, sorry I didn't warn you about this before hand.
PS--I would return that torque wrench if it fails to torque the bolts in a vice as described!!
 
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