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1992 VN 750
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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of moving back to the states and while I was cleaning out the garage and disposing of the needless detritus acquired whilst bike wrenching, I came across a simple solution to my shaky tach. I cut a piece of fuel line about 3/4 inch long and slid it between the housing and the bracket from the dash. It fits perfect in the slot below the tach and blends in so well that it is not even noticeable while sitting on the bike. It is short enough that the sides of the opening in the tach housing hold it in place and it fixed my shaky tach issue. I am sure I could have used duct tape or done some other more complicated repair, but the redneck in me came out and it seemed to only make sense. Shim to fit seems the norm for some quick fixes.

Bike is cleaned up and ready for shipment now! Headed to Colorado Springs so I will be looking for any CO Vulcan riders once I get into town. My household goods won't arrive until mid-November and I am sure it will be a bit too brisk to ride...but given a few warm days I might have to venture out a bit before winter sets in and shuts down the season for good.

How long is the riding season in CO for those that might live there?
 

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Be safe coming back and I would love to live in Colorado someday. Enjoy!
 

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Tach housing on my wife's VN750 shakes quite a bit as well, 3X times as much as the speedometer housing does, is this typical? Thanks for the idea on the rubber hose.
 

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Great tip! I love easy fixes to annoying problems. One would think that a major corporation like Kawasaki, with its teams of engineers, could have come up with a simple rubber plug like the one you've made. After all, they spent 20 years building bikes with shaky tachometers, so there were plenty of test cases to work out a solution.

Next time I pass the auto parts store I'm stopping in to get my 3/4 inch piece of fuel line. Thanks again!
 

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Easy fix with ball bungies...

I wrapped one of these around the tach speedo, hid the ball and everythings great.

 

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I am in the process of moving back to the states and while I was cleaning out the garage and disposing of the needless detritus acquired whilst bike wrenching, I came across a simple solution to my shaky tach. I cut a piece of fuel line about 3/4 inch long and slid it between the housing and the bracket from the dash. It fits perfect in the slot below the tach and blends in so well that it is not even noticeable while sitting on the bike. It is short enough that the sides of the opening in the tach housing hold it in place and it fixed my shaky tach issue....
I can verify that this is a quick, inexpensive and easy way to stop the tachometer from wobbling. I purchased 4" of fuel line from Ace Hardware, cut 3/4", unscrewed the tachometer gauge cup (single screw in the back of the cup), let the gauge cup slide down to enlarge the opening between the gauge mounting bracket and the back of the gauge cup, slid in the 3/4" piece of fuel line and tightened the gauge cup screw. Tightening the gauge cup screw pinches the piece of fuel line and no more wobble!!! I trimmed the excess fuel line hanging out of the opening and now you can't tell it is there.

Thank you bordolover for this great tip!

I also found a use for the remaining fuel line.

I have read threads suggesting that the throttle cable which rubs against the front right spark plug boot can cause a short over time. So, I used the remaining fuel line to cover the cable just above the spark plug boot. Just slice the fuel line, wrap it around the cable and let the friction between the cable and spark plug boot hold it in place. Hopefully this will eliminate the possibility of a future electrical short.
 

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Calif Rider
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cglennon what you mentioned in your thread is a good idea for all electrical wires and cables that can chaf on any part of the bike. In the Air Force this was something I learned with most of the aircraft I worked on. Any line, electrical wire that touches a sharp edge or can rub up on anything on the bike should have a chaffing pad around it. They sell a plastic ribbed split housings that are of different sizes to fit around all kinds of wires or cables. I have them all over my bike to ward off the ware that causes problems after a long period.
 

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cglennon what you mentioned in your thread is a good idea for all electrical wires and cables that can chaf on any part of the bike. In the Air Force this was something I learned with most of the aircraft I worked on. Any line, electrical wire that touches a sharp edge or can rub up on anything on the bike should have a chaffing pad around it. They sell a plastic ribbed split housings that are of different sizes to fit around all kinds of wires or cables. I have them all over my bike to ward off the ware that causes problems after a long period.
Great point! I've seen this for type of housing for bundling and hiding computer cables, but the diameter was very large. Do you have a link for the plastic ribbed split housing that you used?
 

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I did a search, as the shakey tach was getting on my nerves, and found this thread. I loosened the tach screw on the back, stuck about a 1" piece of hose up in there until it stopped, and BINGO! It's hardly visible, and is just as steady as the speedo!

Thanks!
 

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I recently had the tach and speedo off for a mod I was doing. While I had them off I looked at the mounting of these and realized why they vibrate and shake so much. On the back of the tach and speedo, there is a mounting post with a shoulder. A rubber spacer rests against the bracket and gets compressed against the housing by a washer and nut. The problem is that the shoulder on the post is not low enough for decent compression of the rubber spacer. I resolved this by adding a metal washer with an ID large enough to clear the shoulder and compress the rubber spacer tighter against the back of the tach/speedo housing. This make the rubber spacer fit a bit more snug, but still has some dampening to it. I reassembled the dash and mounted it.

This seems to be a real good permanent fix for the shaky tach and speedo. The original configuration left it so loose that you could actually wiggle it on the mount.
 

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Premium Member
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Great tip! I love easy fixes to annoying problems. One would think that a major corporation like Kawasaki, with its teams of engineers, could have come up with a simple rubber plug like the one you've made. After all, they spent 20 years building bikes with shaky tachometers, so there were plenty of test cases to work out a solution.

Next time I pass the auto parts store I'm stopping in to get my 3/4 inch piece of fuel line. Thanks again!
The Vulcan 750 has several different problems.

1. Splines need to be lubed too often, and were not lubed at the factory on most of them.
2. Can't replace the stator without pulling the engine. A simple 2 piece cover would have prevented this issue.
3. Camshaft tensioners are a bad design, and WILL fail somewhere between 10,000-20,000 miles.
4. Coolant passages cast into the cylinders are too close to the edges, causing gasket failure.
5. Tool box door is a joke, and not a funny one.
6. Swingarm caps fall off, brand new ones do not fit properly.
7. The 3 bullet connectors in the stator wires are defective, or the wrong type of connector. I have a feeling these have caused a lot of stator and R/R failures.

Most of these things should have been obvious, or become obvious during the first couple of years of production. They should have all been fixed early in the production run. But Kawasaki chose not to fix a SINGLE one of them.

Surprisingly enough, it is that stupid tool box door that bothers me the most. It shows what kind of people designed this bike. I wonder where the engineer who designed that got their degree, Walmart?


On the other hand, Yamaha made constant improvements to the Virago throughout it's long production run. The early model Viragos are best known for their starter problems. It took 3-4 years for this problem to show up, but when it did, Yamaha immediately changed the design, solving the problem. By it's last year, the Yamaha Virago was just about a perfect v-twin cruiser, all it's problems had been eliminated. So, what does Yamaha do after perfecting it? They drop it and replace it with that stupid V-Star, with tube type tires, no centerstand, and a much less comfortable seat. I don't think Yamaha ever realized what they had in the Virago.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Great point! I've seen this for type of housing for bundling and hiding computer cables, but the diameter was very large. Do you have a link for the plastic ribbed split housing that you used?
Does this help Chris?
http://www.elecdirect.com/catalog/b2b3f81d-7478-43aa-834c-7ba122bd45d2.aspx?gclid=CNXU2bPHj60CFcYKKgodWk8dlQ

Here is a US supplier for the polyethelene split loom covers:
http://www.cabletiesandmore.com/blackloom.php#cable-wraps2

Edit: Both suppliers smallest size is 1/4" ID
 

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Yahoo VN750 Group Owner
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261 Posts
The Vulcan 750 has several different problems.

1. Splines need to be lubed too often, and were not lubed at the factory on most of them.
2. Can't replace the stator without pulling the engine. A simple 2 piece cover would have prevented this issue.
3. Camshaft tensioners are a bad design, and WILL fail somewhere between 10,000-20,000 miles.
4. Coolant passages cast into the cylinders are too close to the edges, causing gasket failure.
5. Tool box door is a joke, and not a funny one.
6. Swingarm caps fall off, brand new ones do not fit properly.
7. The 3 bullet connectors in the stator wires are defective, or the wrong type of connector. I have a feeling these have caused a lot of stator and R/R failures.

Most of these things should have been obvious, or become obvious during the first couple of years of production. They should have all been fixed early in the production run. But Kawasaki chose not to fix a SINGLE one of them.

Surprisingly enough, it is that stupid tool box door that bothers me the most. It shows what kind of people designed this bike. I wonder where the engineer who designed that got their degree, Walmart?


On the other hand, Yamaha made constant improvements to the Virago throughout it's long production run. The early model Viragos are best known for their starter problems. It took 3-4 years for this problem to show up, but when it did, Yamaha immediately changed the design, solving the problem. By it's last year, the Yamaha Virago was just about a perfect v-twin cruiser, all it's problems had been eliminated. So, what does Yamaha do after perfecting it? They drop it and replace it with that stupid V-Star, with tube type tires, no centerstand, and a much less comfortable seat. I don't think Yamaha ever realized what they had in the Virago.
I know you have more miles on VN750s than anyone else, but I've done 70,000 on two of them myself, so I know a little bit. Not everyone's experience has been or will be the same as yours.

1. I don't think 18,000 miles is too often for a spline lube. You're changing the rear tire by then anyway, so it's a minor thing in my opinion.

2. I agree 100%. Stator has failed on both of my 750s -- first one at 18,000 miles and the 2nd one at 47,000. Minor change would have made this an easy job instead of a major pain.

3. I've never had a single issue with cam chain tensioners on either bike, both of which had considerably more than 20,000 miles. So you can't say they WILL fail between 10,000 and 20,000 miles. (I guess you can say it, but you would be wrong.)

4. I don't know, but I've never had a gasket of any kind fail on either of my bikes.

5. I agree the tool box lid is weak. Knowing this, I put some duct tape on the hinge and try not to open it any more than necessary, and it has lasted 8 years and it's still fine.

6. Agree on the swing arm caps. I got new ones and put a dab of silicone sealant and they have lasted 8 years. And at least they are cheap.

7. I agree again. Those bullet connectors are bad, IMO. They should have used heavier gauge wire and used better connectors.


Remember, one advantage to NOT fixing problems is that parts fit all years, and for the most part you don't have to worry about which year your spare parts come from. Even so, I wish they would have fixed a few of the "easy" things over the years. I'm sure NOT fixing them helped to keep the cost down and the profits UP.
 

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I do my splines every 10,000 miles, I believe the maintenance schedule calls for them to be done more often than that, But I don't know for sure because I don't have the owners manual here.

My '93 went through 3 sets of oem cam chain tensioners in 80,000 miles. The '02 didn't fare so well. Originals failed at around 15,000, oem replacements failed in 10,000. I'm quite certain my TOC manual tensioners will easily outlast the engine.

I have never had a gasket fail either, but I have seen dozens of posts from people whose base gaskets were leaking, and I have seen the base of the cylinder. The coolant passages are kind of oval shaped, and about 1/16" from the outer edge. That doesn't leave much for the gasket to seal against.

I tried silicone on my swing arm caps, it just made them slipperier, and they popped right out. I sanded then down a bit, and glued them in place with Permatex #2. I seriously doubt there is any way to get them off without breaking them.

That tool box door is just absurd. Didn't whoever came up with that thing realize that you can only bend plastic back and fourth so many times till it breaks? It looks like some kind of really cheap Walmart toy lunch box. It would have been so easy to put hinges on it. They don't need to be metal, and they wouldn't need to be attached with screws. I have several really cheap plastic tool boxes, and every one of them has actual hinges. They are just snap together plastic hinges, but they have survived years of hard use. The one on my '93 failed in about 4 months, it broke where the hinge should have been, and I lost the door and the lock. I convinced the dealer to replace them under warranty, and never opened that box again. Same on my '02. Door has been opened maybe twice. I lock-tited the retainer ring on the lock, and removed the seat bolts, so I would never have any reason to open that door again. I have ridden my '02 70,000 miles without the seat bolts because of that stupid door. Even the aftermarket never came up with a real tool box door. You would have thought that one timme back when they were making stuff for the VN750 that a company like Highway Hawk would have made a chrome door, maybe with a piano type hinge.
 

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My tach wobble fix was kind of by accident. I keep my key on a chain with a small squeeze float device, originally intended for a motor boat key. It was just the first key chain I pulled out of a drawer. Anyway, it tended to flap in the breeze while riding so I started wedging it against the tach, which also keeps the tach very stable.
 

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I am in the process of moving back to the states and while I was cleaning out the garage and disposing of the needless detritus acquired whilst bike wrenching, I came across a simple solution to my shaky tach. I cut a piece of fuel line about 3/4 inch long and slid it between the housing and the bracket from the dash. It fits perfect in the slot below the tach and blends in so well that it is not even noticeable while sitting on the bike. It is short enough that the sides of the opening in the tach housing hold it in place and it fixed my shaky tach issue. I am sure I could have used duct tape or done some other more complicated repair, but the redneck in me came out and it seemed to only make sense. Shim to fit seems the norm for some quick fixes.

Bike is cleaned up and ready for shipment now! Headed to Colorado Springs so I will be looking for any CO Vulcan riders once I get into town. My household goods won't arrive until mid-November and I am sure it will be a bit too brisk to ride...but given a few warm days I might have to venture out a bit before winter sets in and shuts down the season for good.

How long is the riding season in CO for those that might live there?
I know it's been quite some time but I just stumbled upon this thread and I'm curious about the exact placement of the fuel line and what size you used. I had some 3/16" line and that didn't seem to dampen the vibration much. I placed it inside the chrome housing cap on the bracket where the cup screws into the speedo/tach. I wasn't able to find any other photos of the mod so far... Thanks!
 

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I know it's been quite some time but I just stumbled upon this thread and I'm curious about the exact placement of the fuel line and what size you used. I had some 3/16" line and that didn't seem to dampen the vibration much. I placed it inside the chrome housing cap on the bracket where the cup screws into the speedo/tach. I wasn't able to find any other photos of the mod so far... Thanks!
I would guess it was 3/8" automotive fuel hose.

My tach had a cracked bracket, a couple of spot welds fixed it.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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Of course the BEST way to solve the problem is with a Knifemaker Dash, but unfortunately he got lazy and stopped making them!

Have a look:
Forgot about these.

Sent from my A501DL using Tapatalk
 

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These are some pictures i took showing the needed disassembly to get to the interior bolts, but in the second picture you can see the bracket going into the housing. Loosen the housing and shove the hose into the enlarged hole. It shouldnt be wrapped around anything, just fill the space and push against the housing and bracket when things get tightened back up.
52547
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