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Probably a stupid question, but what the heck?

Recently installed a sealed battery in my 01 750. I have a battery tender that I used last winter on my regular battery. Any problems hooking it up to the new one during down times? I ride year round but there are times when the bike may sit for two or three weeks between snows.
 

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You can check the battery manufacturers website for charging recommendations to be sure, then compare that to the output of your tender to make sure its compatible.

Most SLA's do not want to see a charge current higher than 2 amps, if your tender stays under that, its probabaly okay, subject to the above.

Jon
 

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I do it all the time.
 

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Definitely check for the battery manufacturers recommendation. Mine said nothing over 1.5 amps, which is what my better tender is rated at.
 

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i don't use any battery minder/tender. i pulled my MF battery out and stored it in warm place (closet in our office room). i guess i will let you know how it went and if it is any good in spring. i don't anticipate any problems though as my friend does exacly the same thing and didn't have anyproblem with his 3 year old battery stored from novemer till may.
as someone with electrical backgroung i can't understand what good can constant trickle-charging do to battery life. but then again i'm might be wrong...
 

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Have you tried to start your bike after 2 or 3 weeks just to see if there is that much of a drain on your battery?I live in the northeast corner of CT.And it used to get really cold here ( not bad this year) and my bike starts right up .................
 

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Probably a stupid question, but what the heck?

Recently installed a sealed battery in my 01 750. I have a battery tender that I used last winter on my regular battery. Any problems hooking it up to the new one during down times? I ride year round but there are times when the bike may sit for two or three weeks between snows.
If the charger you used didn't hurt the other battery it won't hurt the sealed battery.
 

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Battery charge....

One piece of knowledge (I think) I have gained is to be sure your battery is as charged as possible when starting the bike up in the spring. Doesn't a well charged battery place the least strain as possible on an already weak stator charging system?

For what its worth, I have done it both ways- leave the battery in and try starting it up in the spring, and this year, pulled the battery and keeping in in the house with me. I now have a gel battery that I hope to keep a while....
 

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I start my bike at least once a week in the winter months I dont have any trouble I let it run until it is warmed up.Maybe even take a little spin. Been doing this for years it always works for me.Yeah..............
 

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i don't use any battery minder/tender. i pulled my MF battery out and stored it in warm place (closet in our office room). i guess i will let you know how it went and if it is any good in spring. i don't anticipate any problems though as my friend does exacly the same thing and didn't have anyproblem with his 3 year old battery stored from novemer till may.
as someone with electrical backgroung i can't understand what good can constant trickle-charging do to battery life. but then again i'm might be wrong...
Due to the construction of the batteries they hava some internal resistance so they discharge themselves little by little (also it has to do with the quemistry of the lead acid battery... hence sulfatation) about 1 to 2% total charge by every week since it was charged. As a battery get older the rate of discharge get's more steep until it does not hold any charge... When you apply a trickle charge (between 13.0 and 13.2 volts) the amount of current going into the battery is about the same it losses by the natural discharge but more important it stops they decay of the acid in suspension stoping sufatation (again some more quemistry). What makes trickel charge a good thing for the battery it keeps it top off but does not boil the water from the battery. In some applications this kind of charge can make batteries last for over ten years. In our case, it's relly nice to know when you want your bike to start it will be ready to do so... In your case tankist MF batteries discharge somewhat slower that regular batteries... still a trickle charge is good... no harm done... just make sure the charge you choose charges to about 1.2 to 1.5 amps... that's about the max current the stock size battery will take safely
 
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My Battery Tender delivers 1.25 amps; this cannot possibly hurt the battery. I leave mine on whenever the bike is in the garage. I got six years out of my last battery.
 

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Due to the construction of the batteries they hava some internal resistance so they discharge themselves little by little (also it has to do with the quemistry of the lead acid battery... hence sulfatation) about 1 to 2% total charge by every week since it was charged. As a battery get older the rate of discharge get's more steep until it does not hold any charge... When you apply a trickle charge (between 13.0 and 13.2 volts) the amount of current going into the battery is about the same it losses by the natural discharge but more important it stops they decay of the acid in suspension stoping sufatation (again some more quemistry). What makes trickel charge a good thing for the battery it keeps it top off but does not boil the water from the battery. In some applications this kind of charge can make batteries last for over ten years. In our case, it's relly nice to know when you want your bike to start it will be ready to do so... In your case tankist MF batteries discharge somewhat slower that regular batteries... still a trickle charge is good... no harm done... just make sure the charge you choose charges to about 1.2 to 1.5 amps... that's about the max current the stock size battery will take safely

just wanted to add temp changes this discharge rate. we carry aircraft batteries at work. anything over 85 will speed the discharge rate. we have to trickle charge our batts every 2 years if the temp gets over 85....every 3 if we stay below 65 and 4 yrs if we stay in the 60's
 

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Mushu, Dan, All. i dunno about this guys... trickle charge at 1.25-1.5A seems like murderously high to me even if for short periods of time. i could not find the source but i read somwhere it is supposed to be about 50-25mA (a bit higher then self discharge rate) for 25Ah battery and our Wesco cell is only 14Ah! it just cannot see how can it be as high as you say for fully (or almost fully) charged battery and not damage anything. that rate seems good for normal charge but not maintenance one. i understand we are not talking AA battaries here but still...
 

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Ah, that's the purpose of a 'smart' batter tender, it charges at a higher rate (1.25 - 1.5 amps), then cuts way back on the current to maintain the charge.
 

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Mushu, Dan, All. i dunno about this guys... trickle charge at 1.25-1.5A seems like murderously high to me even if for short periods of time. i could not find the source but i read somwhere it is supposed to be about 50-25mA (a bit higher then self discharge rate) for 25Ah battery and our Wesco cell is only 14Ah! it just cannot see how can it be as high as you say for fully (or almost fully) charged battery and not damage anything. that rate seems good for normal charge but not maintenance one. i understand we are not talking AA battaries here but still...
Most battery manufacturers will say that it's safe to charge their batteries to about 1/10 of the total amps per hour of the battery, what's important is that the charge current is directly related to the voltage applied to the battery terminals and the state of charge of the battery (the current behavior is very constant across the life of the battery) . Smart chargers have the ability to control the voltage and current been injected to the battery as to never overcharge the battery... When a charger, such as the battery tender, goes in to float charge you are actually about .5 volts above the open circuit full charge voltage of the battery so the current is very small... limited not only by the charger but also by the battery itself to a few milliamps... if the battery at float voltage would require full current (1.5 amps) then what you have is a shorted plate somewhere... this is the way most chargers figure out that the battery is dead...
 

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As a new owner with little experience, can i just store the battery and recharge it in the spring each year? Does that shorten the life of the battery?
 

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ah yes..... batteries ala flambey.... Batery tenders are chargers of choice because once the battery is @ full charge.... they stop charging and just monitor.... if you think that 1.25 to 1.5 amp charge is high.... Battery Tender also has the "Battery Tender jr." it puts out 750 MA and also shuts down at full charge. Less the better for long life. ( this is the one I use )

I'm sure anyone who has a full size charger has heard the sound of bubbling water as the battery is being pumped at 10 + amps.. well at those rates it will cook your cycle battery in no time! But at 1.5 and lower... it will not generate the heat that it would at the rate of a full size charger.... so you get longer life from the battery.

So... if you leave it in or take it out.... as long as you give it a good "trickle" charge before you start in the spring.... all is good!!
 

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As a new owner with little experience, can i just store the battery and recharge it in the spring each year? Does that shorten the life of the battery?
When a battery discharges, it forms sulfates that get dissolved when the battery is reacharged. It's not 100% though. When those sulfates build up enough, a cell shorts out and the battery is officially shot. By leaving the battery hooked up to a charger that's designed for the job (e.g. Battery Tender Jr.) the sulfates won't form (or not to any great extent) and the battery will last longer. I believe Pick is going on 5 or 6 years with the same battery, but he leaves it hooked up over the winter.
 
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