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Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.

I put a coat of primer on Orleans this a.m. and wasn't real happy with how it was going on. Attributed it to operator error with the spray gun, and resolved to be more careful and consistent with the second coat. Which I was. But as I was cleaning up, I realized I totally screwed up the proportions for the primer mixture - it's SUPPOSED to be 2 parts primer/epoxy, 1 part hardener, 1 part reducer. I put in 1 part, 2 parts, and 1 part, respectively. And I'm on vacation, so I shoulda had a clearer head while setting up!!! :doh:

So here's my question to all you painters out there: the primer on the tins is now extra-hard, but perhaps not epoxied right. Should I a) strip them and start all over again? b) remix with the right proportions and give everything one more spray? c) fuhgetaboutit and assume that I've got good, hard coverage? or d) quit and take my tins to a real painter?

I swear. And here I was even really patient about getting to the painting part, ironically, only to screw it up because I didn't take my time at the very end. :mad:
 

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The right thing to do would be to strip it down and do it again. The risk that you are running with the primer being extra hard is that it may not have bonded to the tins correctly and end up cracking. That would seriously jeopardize your color that you are putting over it. You say that it was a 2/1/1 mix and you mixed it 1/2/1. May not have been so bad if you have mixed it 2/2/1. How sure are you sure you mixed it wrong? With that much of a ratio mistake it must have set up DAMN fast. How do you plan on striping it down? Blasting? Sanding (going to be VERY HARD!!)? Rule of thumb in painting is that the paint job is only as good as the prep job.
 

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The right thing to do would be to strip it down and do it again. The risk that you are running with the primer being extra hard is that it may not have bonded to the tins correctly and end up cracking. That would seriously jeopardize your color that you are putting over it. You say that it was a 2/1/1 mix and you mixed it 1/2/1. May not have been so bad if you have mixed it 2/2/1. How sure are you sure you mixed it wrong? With that much of a ratio mistake it must have set up DAMN fast. How do you plan on striping it down? Blasting? Sanding (going to be VERY HARD!!)? Rule of thumb in painting is that the paint job is only as good as the prep job.
Well, it set up damn fast on my hands, but it's still tacky out there - and it's been well over an hour since I gave it the second coat. I'm about 90% sure that I blew it, so I might as well strip it and start over. I was just going to use paint stripper - bubble it up, wipe it off, sand it down, and try again. :(
 

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you can off with what ever it calls to thin it (Acetone usually) Try to stay away from using a stripper on it because you will need to wash it off with a chemical that would neutralize the stripper or you will have bigger headaches. I would say wipe what you can off and then sand it down. If you sand through the primer to bare metal Farley easily then you are good to go. In the 5 years that I worked for a company that did the Harley CVO paint jobs not one did we give more than one coat of primer. Tiny spots that you sand through that are smaller than a quarter was considered to be ok too.
 

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you can off with what ever it calls to thin it (Acetone usually) Try to stay away from using a stripper on it because you will need to wash it off with a chemical that would neutralize the stripper or you will have bigger headaches. I would say wipe what you can off and then sand it down. If you sand through the primer to bare metal Farley easily then you are good to go. In the 5 years that I worked for a company that did the Harley CVO paint jobs not one did we give more than one coat of primer. Tiny spots that you sand through that are smaller than a quarter was considered to be ok too.
Thanks. I stripped everything and will sand it again tonight. It was pretty easy to peel off this time - hadn't been on there for 12 years. :) Let me ask this, though: should the primer go on as smoothly as paint, or will it be a little roughish? This is the HOK stuff (non-sandable) - where it looked like I had a good application, it was still rough - like Rhino Liner, only about 100 times less rough. Was this a product of my poor mixing skills, or is that how it's gonna be?

Thanks a ton for your help!!!
 

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I'm not a painter by any means, but I deal with coatings and their application from time to time at work. My thought is that the primer should be a little rough. The idea is to create an anchor profile of xxx mils for the paint to bond to. If the primer is too smooth the paint has nothing to "hold on to" and will easily chip, bubble or pretty much whatever it wants to do.

Let me know when you get the paint finished and are ready for that star. :beerchug:
 

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Let me know when you get the paint finished and are ready for that star. :beerchug:
You know, I went to "New Posts" and saw your name and thought, "Uh oh, I'm gonna get some admonition about Eagles' fans painting things blue." :)

Thanks for the perspective on the primer. It makes sense - and it seemed right when I looked at it - but, not having done this before, who the heck knows. Better to fix it now and do it right, than to have the paint run off if I get caught in a rainstorm.
 

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Cindy,
Doesn’t matter how smooth your primer coat is as long as it doesn’t show through the base coat (color coat) I assume since you said you have HOK primer that you are doing a 3 step paint (Prime, Color, Clear). In all reality "Texture" doesn’t matter in a prime coat. As far as I know "texture" in primer will not help it adhere to the base coat at all because it is the chemical reaction that bonds the two surfaces together. That is why there are different kinds of paint all of them have there good points and all have there down falls. If there is two much "Texture" in the prime coat you are going to feel more prone to laying on the color coat thicker. The high spots will give you a lighter shade where the low spots will give you a darker shade because of the thickness. Some colors it matters (Yellows, Reds) but depending on the shade of blue you are going with you could be fine you could be in trouble. Lighter shade you will want to be as smooth as you possibly can and a darker blue will be more "Forgiving" Just make sure that each coat is FULLY cured before the next step or it will never cure because you will seal it in and it won’t be able to breathe to cure any further. Nice way of testing this is in a hidden spot underneath the tank or fender do the fingernail test. Lightly push your fingernail in if it leaves a mark it is not hard enough yet, needs more time to cure. And last but not least when you are done DO NOT wax it till next spring. DO NOT use anything but soap and water to clean it and only use water that has VERY LITTLE pressure behind it. Like a genital shower. Cleaners and wax will clog up the pores and not allow the paint to fully cure. Because in reality it will take months for your paint to breath and cure to its fullest potential.
 

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In my experience with painting cars, I have always sanded the primer down to be as smooth as glass. The paint would go on smoothe and then get a nice wet sanding. Then the clear coat. By doing that, you ensure even color and a pristein finish.
 

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....DO NOT use anything but soap and water to clean it and only use water that has VERY LITTLE pressure behind it. Like a genital shower. Cleaners and wax will clog up the pores....
:wow:
:wow:LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The HOK primer is non-sandable, so I guess whatever goes on is what I get. Which, as was pointed out yesterday, is critical to the final paint job looking good, so I'm back to square one. It's already too warm today to paint, so I'm gonna rethink my painting set-up, too. I've got garage space, have plastic sheeting, but somehow yesterday got everything in a postion where I couldn't hit all sides of the parts evenly. I made a mess of things, so I'm glad I'm starting over. But can I set things on like a wooden platform, prime the "top" side, and then, when that's dry, flip everything and prime the other side? The set-up worries me less when it comes to the primer, but definitely when it comes to the base coat.

Any suggestions? I did try hanging stuff from the garage ceiling, but I don't want to talk about how that went, either. :hitanykey
 

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Cindy,
The quality of the primer finish effects the top coat. In other words for the best looking job use a sanding primer. If you are using a basecoat/clear coat system it is more forgiving of defects in the primer that has not been sanded smooth (320 wet sanding) as the clear coat would normally be sanded out and then buffed for the best appearance. I prefer a single stage paint such as polyureathane. Most clear coats are just to "soft" for my likeing. As for painting one side and them the other your quality of finish will not be as good as you cannot prevent overspray. When you hang and paint and keep a wet leading edge any overspray will blend in. Kinda hard to explain but because all the paint is still wet the chemicals pull the paint togather. Check out your local community college most have body shop programs and the instructors normally don't mind giving a little free advice.
 
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