Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok, determined it is some rust in the tank. Without going to radical in the steps, which is the best way to get the rust out? The BB trick with acid, the 3 step creme process, or just keep flushing it with seafoam and gas (I could use the gas in my beatup car:loser1: )

I know my carbs will gunk up again if I don't get to it right away.
 

·
and the Adventure Cycle
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
Check out THIS section of the Vulcan Verses.

It's a little extreme in a way, but should work, with little cost.

There's also THIS ONE there too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The first one with the BB's sounds the easiest to do, I probably won't throw it in the dryer (my girlfriend would kill me). After you do this do you coat the tank? If so, with what.
 

·
and the Adventure Cycle
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
photohap said:
After you do this do you coat the tank? If so, with what.
Well, there are products out there for coating the inside of a tank. I don't know off hand what/where, but someone here should.

If ya did the second process, while cleaning it, it creates it's own rustproof coating.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
43 Posts
photohap said:
Ok, determined it is some rust in the tank. Without going to radical in the steps, which is the best way to get the rust out? The BB trick with acid, the 3 step creme process, or just keep flushing it with seafoam and gas (I could use the gas in my beatup car:loser1: )

I know my carbs will gunk up again if I don't get to it right away.

When I got my bike there was a lot of gunk and rust in the tank. I used the POR15 kit to restore my tank. The inside cleaned up well.

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I am debating, but I will probably go the creme route, kind of nervous on this since my tank doesn't leek and isn't severely rusty. The bike will be a daily rider , even in the winter here in Seattle. I have done the creme before and had success, but I am still nervous on it.
 

·
and the Adventure Cycle
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
In doing some searching on this subject, it would seem as though the biggest thing is following directions, exactly, and be patient. Don't rush whatever way ya end up doing it and things should work out just fine.
You're a Vulcaneer, you can do it !!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I did lots of research

I am starting the tank cleaning here shortly.

The method I will be using is listed below,it seems pretty widely used. I called a few radiator shops and they recommended this also over using creme to seal the tank. copied from another website:

Most recently, I've settled on a Muratic acid wash followed by a dose of phosphoric acid as the best method, mostly because it always gets the job done and doesn't require a lot of physical effort. To do the job you first have to decide if the tank has scaly rust or just surface rust. If the rust hasn't gotten to the point where it's scaly you can skip the 1/4" nuts, referred to later.

Flush out any oily varnish that may be coating the lower regions of the tank with acetone or any of those engine degreasers. If you choose the engine degreaser flush the tank with water.

Remove the fuel level sensor. Seal it's opening with GOOD duct tape.

Remove the petcock and seal it up with an appropriate plug or capped section of hose.

Dump 30 or so 1/4" nuts into the tank.

Pour in a pint or so of Muratic acid. Seal up the fill spout with GOOD duct tape. Wear gloves, old clothes, and safety goggles. Agitate the tank for 10 to fifteen minutes. During this time you can monitor the pressure in the tank by watching the duct tape bulging at the fill hole. If too much pressure develops, carefully vent it by peeling the tape back than reseal and keep shaking.

Next pick a piece of concrete that you don't particularly care about. Remove the tape from the sender opening and fill hole and flush the tank with cold water. The acid that has not already been consumed will neutralize itself on the concrete. You're still wearing goggles and gloves right?

Now dry off the openings and reseal them with GOOD duct tape. This time pour in a pint of naval jelly, or milk stone remover or tile haze remover. These are all phosphoric acid formulations. Phosphoric acid is not as aggressive as Muratic acid and therefore is mostly a waste of time if you're trying to really remove rust. What phosphoric acid will really do well is leave the inside of the tank coated with iron phosphate, which is somewhat rust resistant. For this step you do not need much agitation. Just tumble the tank over several times and let it set for a half hour or so and then tumble it again. After about two hours of this go back to the concrete slab and open the tank and flush it out thoroughly, THOUROUGHLY.

Now bring it back in the shop and secure a blow dryer to the fill hole and force dry the tank. This may take two hours. Position the tank in different orientations during this process to make sure that no seam holds water. Once it's really dry you're done. If you skip the phosphoric acid step the inside of the tank will flash rust before you can get it dried out. I've probably cleaned ten tanks with the method I described and never damaged the exterior paint or eaten through the steel.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,647 Posts
I used the Yamaha tank cleaner on mine. It's a two step process that doesn't require BBs or coating after treatment is completed. I had a fairly severe rust problem in that my tank had sat for 4 years half full of gas. The process took about 5 hours total and once the tank was reassembled and back on the bike, I haven't had a problem and it's been about 4 months or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Looking around in the tank, there isn't heavy rust, only a few spots here and there. There is something roaming around in the tank that won't come out, fuel filter maybe? My petcock still has one on it, I have read that some bikes have two? Mine is a 93, non california model
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
The best way to cure rust is to blast with a dry alumina grit down to base metal, you may get left with a few holes (where the rust was) that are easily filled, but once painted and sealed the rust should not come back.

F.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Well now I am with the naval jelly. That muratic acid was some strong stuff, hold your breath while you are agitating and have baking soda handy. Also if your rust is not the bad, skip the nuts portion, I can tell they will be a pain to get out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,647 Posts
Shoudn't have anything else in the tank other than the petcock inlet and the fruel level float assembly. The float for the fuel level can rattle around on the end of its boom when there is no fuel in the tank. Make sure you take the assembly out of the tank when you put the acid in or you will damage it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Sky Rider said:
Shoudn't have anything else in the tank other than the petcock inlet and the fruel level float assembly. The float for the fuel level can rattle around on the end of its boom when there is no fuel in the tank. Make sure you take the assembly out of the tank when you put the acid in or you will damage it.
I did. Found it was another filter. I read somewhere that someone else had this happen too. When I get all the bolts out, maybe I will find the metal tube it goes on. So the bike has two fuel filters in the tank?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
I didn't take the time to look for it, but I wrote a similar instruction using muriatic acid and navel jelley. Thought I posted it here quite a while back. Anyway... Trick to removing the nuts is with a small magnet on a stick. However, make sure before hand that your nuts are all steel! (kind of late for this note)
My police bike had a badly rusted tank, inside was brown and flakey, gas was brownish red. AFter this procedure back in December, my tank is still rust free and silver inside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
fergy said:
I didn't take the time to look for it, but I wrote a similar instruction using muriatic acid and navel jelley. Thought I posted it here quite a while back. Anyway... Trick to removing the nuts is with a small magnet on a stick. However, make sure before hand that your nuts are all steel! (kind of late for this note)
My police bike had a badly rusted tank, inside was brown and flakey, gas was brownish red. AFter this procedure back in December, my tank is still rust free and silver inside.

Well the nuts are alll removed.. Yes the magnetic stick is the key. One step I did further was to coat the tank with wd40 after the navel jelly flush. I then blow dryed it thouroghly, and shook some filterd gas through it. I sent the girlfriend up to the station to fill it up.. You do know that this routine requires a few beers to do it right :pepper: Gonna do one more filtered gas routine (have to send her up again:D ) Then will try firing her (the bike not the girlfriend) up again... BTW the old gas goes in my beater car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Guess what!!! This really worked. The horsepower was improved quite drastically, to the point it scared me for a sec.

I highly recommend this to anyone with a rusty tank. Flush it well as the intsructions say.. Use Wd40 to get the last of the water out, and a hair dryer, then quickly fill it with gas, drain that gas, and fill it again.

I am thinking about writing a step by step for this to help others.. Someone else did also, but is not in the verses..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top