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1986 VN750
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3,255 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As the weather gets better and better, more and more bikes are being de-winterized and back on the streets. Before you get your bike out next time, take the time to read the date code on the tires. You may find your tires are older than you thought. :BLAM:

Pre-Year 2000 (If your tires have this you need to replace them immediately)
The date is indicated by two numbers for the week and one for the year in the decade. In the case of my 90 Vulcan 750, the tire was made in week 47 of 1995. How do I know it was '95, not '85 or even '75? For the 1990s only, a small triangle was used as a suffix to indicate that decade. Before 1990, you're on your own. And you probably should have tossed them by now anyway.

Year 2000+
From 2000 on, the code is four digits long (though some manufacturers didn't start stamping four numbers until late in that year); and so, for another example, my ST1100's old back tire is a '4704,' created in week 47 of 2004. Simple stuff - after 1990, that is. I have a pile of older rubber awaiting disposal in the back of the Big Shed with year codes that could indicate manufacture in either the Disco or Glam Rock era, but I can't tell.
Now to the longer DOT designation. The ST1100's front skin reads 'DOT ENYO VLK 1704.' We're interested in the first two letters after DOT and the date code. The remaining characters identify the size and type of tire using codes specific to the manufacturer. The first two letters designate the factory where the tire was made (differs by make).

So now you've really got no excuse. You can confirm the age of your tire using the date code, and you can even tell where it was made. But if in doubt, replace!
 

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Super Moderator
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11,860 Posts
And I'll add you should not only check your tires air pressure at least once a week if you're riding frequently, but to visually check your tires also.

My neighbor found a small piece of rusty metal stuck in his front tire...not deep enough to lose air, but hit a bump and it would have driven it in so it would.

I still recommend putting Ride On in your tires, buying a good tire pressure gauge and using it often. Just a few pounds low makes a difference....
 

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Registered
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2,051 Posts
does that ride on work in tubed tires?

I replace a tire per season or two just about so mine are never that old, which is good.
 

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..have a vulcan good day!
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4,508 Posts
does that ride on work in tubed tires?

I replace a tire per season or two just about so mine are never that old, which is good.
Absolutely

:smiley_th +1
 
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