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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #1
I just ran across this evaluation of Ride On tire sealant by a rider who has frequently put 10K miles on his bike in a month. We have had some controversy expressed here on the board, about the wisdom of using any tire sealants . I think the opinion of a rider with experience like this is valuable to me. The pictures are also quite informative. I hope you find the link helpful too.

http://lifeisaroad.com/forum/index.php?topic=749.msg2738#msg2738

Daniels 4 week long, 10,000 miles trip to Alaska in 2004:
http://lifeisaroad.com/stories/2004/10/23/alaska2004index.html
 

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I certainly can't claim to put 10,000 miles on a bike in a month, though I've come close a few times on long trips, that were few and far between. Trips like that is where the best designed part of the Vulcan 750, the seat, really shines.

But back to Ride On. I use it and recommend it in tubeless tires. It would be practically worthless in tube type tires, because motorcycle tubes are paper thin, and tend to explode when punctured, ripping a big hole in them. If by chance that doesn't happen, whatever punctured them will wiggle around and cut them up by the time you get stopped. My best advice about tube type tires is to avoid them at all costs, unless you have a centerstand, and are willing to remove the wheel, then remove the tire, put in a new tube, put the tire back on the wheel, and the wheel back on the bike. All beside the road. Yes I've done it many times. With a centerstand. Without one, all you can do is just stand there and look at it and hope help comes along.

I have Metzler ME880s on my Vulcan, that are about half worn out. I have Ride On in both of them. I also have 2 plugs in the rear one, and unless one of them becomes irreparably damaged, I intend to use them till they are worn out. I see no danger in doing this. The tire carcass is very strong ans well reinforced. Even if a plug came out, the Ride On would seal it, and even if the Ride On failed to seal completely, it would lose air so slowly that you would have plenty of time to notice the problem and get pulled over, where you could simply install another plug, air it up, and be on your way.


I feel the same way about replacing a nearly new (and expensive) tire, just because it has a small hole in it. Unless it has serious damage, it is still completely safe. Go ahead and wear it out. I feel the same way about this that I do about wearing too much gear. Both are just a bit over the top. Both take things to extremes, well beyond reason. The only bike related issues I go that far on is riding skills and maintaining my bikes. Riding skills, unlike gear, is something that nobody has enough of. Keep practicing your entire riding life. Aim for perfection, even though it is unattainable. Riding skills will keep you from crashing, gear won't. Keeping your bike properly maintained not only makes it a lot safer, but just as important, it makes it last a lot longer.

Yeah, I got a bit carried away, but IMO, ATGATT and replacing a brand new tire because it has a tiny hole in it is also getting carried away. I think motorcycle safety would benefit from the use of a little more common sense. Jerry.
 

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"I think motorcycle safety would benefit from the use of a little more common sense" Jerry.
 

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MANIC MECHANIC
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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #6

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MANIC MECHANIC
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I use a Patch-plug to repair my tires. It is the best of both worlds patch and plug all in one it looks like a regular patch with a 2 inch long metal spike attached. the spike is hollow and has the plug inside. to use you take a carbide cutting bit and ream the luncture out to 1/4 inch the buff the inside of the tire like you normally would for a patch. apply rubber cement and allow to dry. insert the metal spike into the puncture and pull through with pliers the spike will come off leaving the plug in the puncture and the patch pulled tightly into the inside of the tire. use the roller wheel to press the patch into the rubber cement remove the plastic from the back of the patch and cover with overbuff sealant then trim the excess plug off even with the tread. I know this is a little detailed but I also know there are some who have never patched or push plugged a tire.
 

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I am using the strip type like come with the Stop and Go kit Model # 1066. You remove whatever punctured the tire, stick a rasp through the puncture and work it back and forth a couple of times, then thread one of the plugs through the applicator halfway, coat it good with rubber cement, push it all the way through the hole in the tire, then pull it out until the insertion tool is completely out of the tire, and cut the plug off fairly close to the tire with a razor blade.

I have used these plugs in motorcycle tires, quad tires, car tires, lawn mower tires, tractor tires, etc. and never had one fail. Jerry.
 

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I use a Patch-plug to repair my tires. It is the best of both worlds patch and plug all in one it looks like a regular patch with a 2 inch long metal spike attached. the spike is hollow and has the plug inside. to use you take a carbide cutting bit and ream the luncture out to 1/4 inch the buff the inside of the tire like you normally would for a patch. apply rubber cement and allow to dry. insert the metal spike into the puncture and pull through with pliers the spike will come off leaving the plug in the puncture and the patch pulled tightly into the inside of the tire. use the roller wheel to press the patch into the rubber cement remove the plastic from the back of the patch and cover with overbuff sealant then trim the excess plug off even with the tread. I know this is a little detailed but I also know there are some who have never patched or push plugged a tire.
I'm one and I appreciate the detail.

John
 

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Love My Baby
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I used a mushroom plug from stop & go when I got a screw hole in my rear tire when my baby was only 1000 miles or so new. Worked great. Unfortunately for me I got talked into replacing the tire for perceived safety reasons. Next time, ride-on and the stop & go plug and keep the tire while it's still good. Hopefully I won't have to actually get a punctured tire, though!
 

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MANIC MECHANIC
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I punctured my brand new rear tire after 100 miles this year after 10 years of puncture free riding. i told my friends I replaced it because i got tired of hearing I needed to replace it.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #12
I use a Patch-plug to repair my tires. It is the best of both worlds patch and plug all in one it looks like a regular patch with a 2 inch long metal spike attached. the spike is hollow and has the plug inside. to use you take a carbide cutting bit and ream the luncture out to 1/4 inch the buff the inside of the tire like you normally would for a patch. apply rubber cement and allow to dry. insert the metal spike into the puncture and pull through with pliers the spike will come off leaving the plug in the puncture and the patch pulled tightly into the inside of the tire. use the roller wheel to press the patch into the rubber cement remove the plastic from the back of the patch and cover with overbuff sealant then trim the excess plug off even with the tread. I know this is a little detailed but I also know there are some who have never patched or push plugged a tire.
I know this is the type of patch (installed from the inside out) that is recommended IF you are going to patch a mc tire. I have patched many car tires over the years with regular patches, without the spike/plug you describe. On my 1/2 ton I have once used the strip plugs that Jerry described, but only long enough to get to a tire repair shop. In hindsight, I could probably have wore the tire out with the plug in it.

I will be getting a stopngo mushroom plug kit to carry with me in the car and truck fulltime, and it will go on my bike too, when I get back on the road. When new tires go on the bike, RideOn tire sealant will be going in the front for sure. Probably going to darkside the rear tire, and the mushroom plugs will be sufficient for roadside repair, for the same reasons Daniel expressed in his evaluation in the first post.
 

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Some tire damage is safely repairable, including all simple punctures in the tread area, and some is not, including sidewall damage, or more severe damage to the tread area, like what would be caused by a piece of glass or a sharp piece of metal.

I have no problems riding 80+ mph on the freeway with 2 plugs and Ride On in my rear tire, because I know exactly what kind of condition it is in. If you are unsure whether or not it is repairable,or whether you can safely repair it, then I would replace it. Almost nobody will repair a motorcycle tire for you, because they are all afraid of getting sued. That's why tire manufacturers do not recommend repairing their tires, or putting anything in them. It's not because tires cannot be repaired safely a lot of the time, it's just that the tire manufacturers can't afford to take the chance.


While on the subject of manufacturers and lawsuits, that is also the reason motorcycle manufacturers recommend that you break in your new bike the wrong way. It helps prevent them from getting sued. First of all, it is likely to be a bike you are not yet familiar with, second, they figure if anything does go wrong due to a factory defect, and the engine locks up, or the brakes fail, it will be in the first few hundred miles. So they want you riding nice and slow for those first few hundred miles. If they told new bike owners to go out and run the bike up to redline in the first 20 miles, which is the right way to do it, there would be a lot more injuries, and a lot more lawsuits. Jerry.
 

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Some tire damage is safely repairable, including all simple punctures in the tread area, and some is not, including sidewall damage, or more severe damage to the tread area, like what would be caused by a piece of glass or a sharp piece of metal.

I have no problems riding 80+ mph on the freeway with 2 plugs and Ride On in my rear tire, because I know exactly what kind of condition it is in. If you are unsure whether or not it is repairable,or whether you can safely repair it, then I would replace it. Almost nobody will repair a motorcycle tire for you, because they are all afraid of getting sued. That's why tire manufacturers do not recommend repairing their tires, or putting anything in them. It's not because tires cannot be repaired safely a lot of the time, it's just that the tire manufacturers can't afford to take the chance.


While on the subject of manufacturers and lawsuits, that is also the reason motorcycle manufacturers recommend that you break in your new bike the wrong way. It helps prevent them from getting sued. First of all, it is likely to be a bike you are not yet familiar with, second, they figure if anything does go wrong due to a factory defect, and the engine locks up, or the brakes fail, it will be in the first few hundred miles. So they want you riding nice and slow for those first few hundred miles. If they told new bike owners to go out and run the bike up to redline in the first 20 miles, which is the right way to do it, there would be a lot more injuries, and a lot more lawsuits. Jerry.
Interesting. I have a stop n go kit for my bike but haven't used it yet. It looks like good stuff though.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Discussion Starter #15
Practice once on an old tire at home with those stopngo mushroom plugs, before you need it for real.
Then when you need it on the side of the road someday in the dark, you already know how to use it. :D JM $0.02 worth.
 

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1985 VN-700
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Is your safety or life worth a 100 plus dollar tire? I think on a long trip the sealant my get you to a bike shop or even home but thats it. If you get a hole buy a new tire if at all possible. I have patched tube type tires. And by the way the tubes are plenty thick, or at least they were back then. The only way to patch a tubeless is from the inside ive been told.
 

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Pulled a small screw out of my Ride On treated rear tire several thousand miles ago. Has a few thousand of tread left and I'm gonna ride it till then.
 

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MANIC MECHANIC
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Is your safety or life worth a 100 plus dollar tire? I think on a long trip the sealant my get you to a bike shop or even home but thats it. If you get a hole buy a new tire if at all possible. I have patched tube type tires. And by the way the tubes are plenty thick, or at least they were back then. The only way to patch a tubeless is from the inside ive been told.
Fear tactics and tire manufacturer propaganda I agree with Jerry a motorcycle tire can be repaired safely. if the damage is in the right place or not too large. so far I have 2500 miles on my repair no problems yet.
 

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Well it scares me. although I did run a tire a little too long once. But officer it has tread on the sides, thats really where you need it!
 

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MANIC MECHANIC
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i didnt say i repaired a junk carcass the tire only had 200 miles on it, the puncture was dead center, and I used a patch plug as i described earlier.
 
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