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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all,

I made a video of my fork seal replacement.
Fork Seal Replacement Video
Long video (17-1/2 min)

I didn't do everything properly, so there's a lot of notes in the video.

I should have read Lance's post first.
 

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I think you forgot your link, but I found my way to it under your channel.

Honestly, I think every video/thread you make should just have a sticky. These videos are incredibly helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think you forgot your link, but I found my way to it under your channel.

Honestly, I think every video/thread you make should just have a sticky. These videos are incredibly helpful.
Whoops! Fixed.

Thanks.
 

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Fantastic video, and perfect timing. I have all my seals and new springs ready to go in this weekend. Using this video, reading Lance's sticky thread and combining the info and having my manual nearby should make this job go smoothly.
THANK YOU!!!!!!!!
 

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Hey Roach, good job. I`ve read the manual and lance`s sticky a few times, but nothing beats seeing the job actually performed. Even when you get a few things out of order. lol :)

My dust seals are disintegrating but I think the oil seals are still OK. But since my scoot is 20 years old I figure it`s time for for a complete service/oil change/rebuild of the forks anyway. I have a complete set of oil and dust seals already and the new cir-clips for the top of the inner slider tube are at the dealers. The first clips they sent me were the big ones for the oil seal in the lower slider tube. Did you replace both sets of cir-clips, or just the smaller diameter ones at the top of the fork tubes?

I`m curious about the condition of the fork oil too. Was it stinky or foamy or milky like it had any water contamination? Or did it come out looking pretty clean?
 

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I`m curious about the condition of the fork oil too. Was it stinky or foamy or milky like it had any water contamination? Or did it come out looking pretty clean?
Hey Hoss, Just did my seals this past weekend. my bike is also ablut 20 years old and had one leaky seal. the oil that came out of mine was totally black and stinky. On the side that was leaking, almost no oil was in there, on the "good" side, there wasn't much there either. dont know if it evaporates with age or what? The new oil of course is completely clear. I threw in some progressive springs also and I can tell a difference.
Good luck with your seal job.
 

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Thanks phurp. I hope the fork tube that was leaking is healed up after your service.

I haven`t ridden enough yet to know if I need progressive springs or not.
I hope to rectify that situation by this time next year! :)
 

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useing this video I did the left fork in about 30 min... after watching the video about 10 times.. then useing the video and going step by step...took me about 15 min for the right side!
 

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Sweet video. I'll bookmark it for future reference.
 

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Nice vid, it still amazes me that people still think it's necessary to do a complete tear down of the forks to change the oil seal and dust cap...

But to each his own....
 

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Ditto...

it still amazes me that people still think it's necessary to do a complete tear down of the forks to change the oil seal and dust cap
Ive done seals for years (albeit my bikes were much older), and even did em w/o taking off wheel (one leg at a time/flip axle for other)...I may just try that, because Im really not into a whole teardown. Any hints, let us know, eh ?...gonna start mine tomorrow. And gonna try the old way.
Releasing air, draining fluid, removing lower hex should be enough, no ?
 

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Ive done seals for years (albeit my bikes were much older), and even did em w/o taking off wheel (one leg at a time/flip axle for other)...I may just try that, because Im really not into a whole teardown. Any hints, let us know, eh ?...gonna start mine tomorrow. And gonna try the old way.
Releasing air, draining fluid, removing lower hex should be enough, no ?
Actually the way I did it involved very little disassembly.

1: Removed fork from tree
2: Removed drain plug and drained the oil from the forks, using a pumping action to get as much oil from them as possible.
3: Removed the cap at the top of the fork, after bleeding the air out (I put my fork in the vise, I used a lot of rags to protect the chrome as I clamped them down).
4: Removed the dust seal
5: I got some small sheet metal screws and screwed them into the old seal, after I removed the retaining ring. I used 3 of them and put them at 1/3 of a turn from each other (2,6,and 10 o'clock) I just put the screws about 2 threads into the seal, not any more than that. The trick is to get screws that are small enough to clear the main fork as you pull them up, but have a big enough head to grab on to.
6 GENTLY work the old seal up off of the fork, I just would pull a little bit on each screw, take you time. It may take a couple of minutes.
7. After you get the old seal off, I just used a bit of new fork oil on the inside of the seal and on the fork to install the new seal. It should slide right down with very little resistance.. To seat the seal, I used a punch and tapped it into the recess where it goes. TAP GENTLY!!!!

The rest of the process is just a reverse of this. I used hydraulic jack oil for my fork oil. Seems to be working well, I'll know more this winter when I service the forks and see how it held up.

This was done on a 454 LTD, but the process will be the same as the Vulcan...
 

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Thanks bro...

Thanks...thats about what I figured...old seal is trash anyway, so do what ya need to get it out (Im gonna use woodscrews and a dent puller)...
If it came to it, I'da removed the bottom hex, then manually "topped em out"...thats how we always did it...
Doing it tomorrow, so will post my results after...:beerchug:
 

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Actually the way I did it involved very little disassembly.

1: Removed fork from tree
2: Removed drain plug and drained the oil from the forks, using a pumping action to get as much oil from them as possible.
3: Removed the cap at the top of the fork, after bleeding the air out (I put my fork in the vise, I used a lot of rags to protect the chrome as I clamped them down).
4: Removed the dust seal
5: I got some small sheet metal screws and screwed them into the old seal, after I removed the retaining ring. I used 3 of them and put them at 1/3 of a turn from each other (2,6,and 10 o'clock) I just put the screws about 2 threads into the seal, not any more than that. The trick is to get screws that are small enough to clear the main fork as you pull them up, but have a big enough head to grab on to.
6 GENTLY work the old seal up off of the fork, I just would pull a little bit on each screw, take you time. It may take a couple of minutes.
7. After you get the old seal off, I just used a bit of new fork oil on the inside of the seal and on the fork to install the new seal. It should slide right down with very little resistance.. To seat the seal, I used a punch and tapped it into the recess where it goes. TAP GENTLY!!!!

The rest of the process is just a reverse of this. I used hydraulic jack oil for my fork oil. Seems to be working well, I'll know more this winter when I service the forks and see how it held up.

This was done on a 454 LTD, but the process will be the same as the Vulcan...
After reading your fork seal replacement method using 3 screws to remove the old seal, it sounds vaguely familiar. I must have read it here or on another forum somewhere in the past 3 years. I agree that it is easier and less involved than lance328`s complete dis assembly, cleaning, reassembly and oil refill.

However my 750 is 20 years old with almost 21K kilometers (13 K miles) on the clock and I have no idea of what previous maintenance it received before I bought it 3 years ago. The dust seals are cracking and deteriorated and I suspect they may be the originals. I have no way of knowing if the fork oil has ever been changed either.

This is my first motorcycle so I have little to no previous experience to judge by, but I don`t recall any particular problem with the forks or suspension when I last rode it in 2008. The fork tubes were twisted 30* or so in the head clamps in my accident, but were easily twisted back straight by hand after loosening the clamp bolts. The bike was ridden 5 miles home from the accident scene by a friend, with the off kilter fork/handlebars, but has not been ridden since the fork was straightened out.

My feeling are that I should do a complete dis assembly and inspection as per lance`s directions, as much because the age of the scoot, as for any damage it may have received in the accident.

I am curious which method you would recommend for my bike based on the information I have related here.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hey Gordan,

Sorry I missed your first post.

I think the oil was in OK shape when I drained mine. I've had it turn white on other bikes due to water getting it there. But the VN was pretty good looking inside.

I actually agree with In'till'zah, a complete diss-assembly is not necessary. But I have no idea what this bike has been through before I acquired it, and I like to be thorough.

I've actually used the screw method on a set of older dirtbike forks. It works well.

I think this bike of mine had been sitting for the past 20 years, so the diss-assembly method allowed me to clean all the parts very well. It's also kind of neat to see how everything works.
 

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Hey ?

See my latest writeup on this subject w/pics...new thread...
And Im not condoning this for all, but if circumstances permit, its definitelty easier....my fork oil was normal when drained with just a lil black ooze (seal ?)...no water or discolloration, so I did the quickie....:beerchug: ...quicker to be back riding....*wink*...
 

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Hey Gordan,

Sorry I missed your first post.

I think the oil was in OK shape when I drained mine. I've had it turn white on other bikes due to water getting it there. But the VN was pretty good looking inside.

I actually agree with In'till'zah, a complete diss-assembly is not necessary. But I have no idea what this bike has been through before I acquired it, and I like to be thorough.

I've actually used the screw method on a set of older dirtbike forks. It works well.

I think this bike of mine had been sitting for the past 20 years, so the diss-assembly method allowed me to clean all the parts very well. It's also kind of neat to see how everything works.
I will probably do the complete disassembly on the fork tubes myself, and polish the lowers up good while they are off. I`m like you roach. I like to take things apart to really see how they are put together and how they work. Then the next time the fork tubes need to be serviced I will satisfied to just change the oil and/or the seals without a complete teardown. :)
 

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The reason for the COMPLETE teardown is to look at the parts to see what shape they are in, to clean them and to make sure they are in good working order.
Seals can be changed w/o having to tear down the forks.
A small round or flat punch will work. You can also use a small seal puller once you get a small hole in the top of the seal.
I use a small punch and hammer. You have to be absolutely careful not to damage the lower forks. I lightly tap the punch through the top of the seal, and carefully pry it upwards.
I use a piece of plastic PVC pipe the drive the seals back into the forks. I cut a piece longer than the forks to clear the top, then put a 2X4 over it, the lightly tap the seal into place.
A vice is a godsend for working on forks. But with some patience and time, you can do it on a garage floor.
 
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