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Discussion Starter #41 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #42 (Edited)

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so first, i wanna say thanks to everyone who contributed to this topic. i did the mod yesterday. i'll tell you how it went and what i did that was different.

everything worked. after it was all done - 14.6v. i have never had over 13v since i bought the bike a recently it was under 12v. but it didn't happen without some snags.

first, the screws to that outer cover would not come off for the life of me. we ended up using an old school impact screwdriver and even with that, it was a struggle. every quarter turn was like pulling teeth. once that cover was off, we cut into the casing. the dremel tool had a few problems. the angles were weird and it was taking a really long time. so after about 1/4 of the way around, we switched and used a tool called a rotozip.

http://www.rotozip.com/en-us/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?pid=RZ1_1

that worked much better. we were able to cut a clean line. we did break two of the rotozip bits, but the cutting went much better.

for the sheet metal piece, we did it a little different. i bought an extra stator cover with a stator in it for about $50 bucks on ebay. i figured it would be helpful and if we messed up, we could use it to replace the one on the bike. so we took a clear piece of plastic and laid it over the back side of the old stator cover. and we used a thin drill to mark where all 6 screw holes went. we took that template and laid it over the sheet metal and marked our spots to cut. we didn't cut that with a dremel tool, we used metal cutting sheers. they worked great. and once we had our circle cut out, we used a drill (we didn't have a drill press or we would have used that) to cut the screw holes.

now - the screws. in one picture, it says 6x15mm machine screws to hold the stator in place. one picture says 6x30. i bought 6x35 thinking i'd cut them down because the store didn't have 6x30. they were way too short. we ended up going back to 3 home depots and an orchard supply before we found the right size machine screws. we settled with 6x50mm screws and ended up cutting them down a few mm's.

we sealed it all up and fired up the bike. it all seemed to work great. and then...oil leak from the bottom of the cover. DAMN IT!!!! So this is where i am now. it only leaks when i run the bike. i ordered a new gasket and more silicone. i hope that it'll solve my problem. i would recommend buying a new gasket right off the bat. we also had a hella of a time trying to figure out where to grind down the ribs on the inside of the cover to let the timing wires be free of pressure. there really is no way except trial and error.

also - there has been a lot of talk on this forum about the metal shavings. i don't know enough about bikes to say whether or not i'm screwed but i will say that there were a lot of metal shavings. i cleaned up what i could, but of course i'm still a bit worried about it. cutting the case the way we did really caused a large pile of shavings that seemed to be drawn to the inside of the bike. one thing we did do, however, was used a shop vac next to the cutting tool while we cut. i think it really helped. i could see some of the powder getting sucked up real good.

i took some pics of the whole thing, but they are on my phone and i haven't had time to sync it all up. i'll post the pics as soon as i do that. i would recommend this to anyone with a dead stator with a few words of advice:

- it's gonna take all day. the whole project (including going to 4 hardware stores to find 3 screws) took about 8.5 hours. and it wasn't just cause i'm a rookie. i had a metal worker helping me and it still took us all day. i have the sunburn to prove it.
- i found that extra stator cover on ebay for fairly cheap and it was a real help to see the back side of what we were doing. i wouldn't say it was absolutely necessary, but it really helped us.
- you really have to get the placement of the screw holes exact. there is no buffer with that stator. it will rub the rotor if you are a fraction off. better to make two plates than buy a new rotor.
- i'd get some help. don't do it alone. we had 3 guys all clunking our heads together and we all came up with good ideas throughout the day. i never could have done this one my own.
- buy a gasket. i should have done this...

and if anyone wants the plastic template i made, i'd be happy to pass it around. i make no guarantees though... just send me a pm and i'll drop it in the mail (in the U.S. of course).
 

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Discussion Starter #44 (Edited)
(1) The screws to the outer cover would not come off. We ended up using an impact screwdriver.
(2) We cut into the casing. The dremel tool had a few problems. The angles were weird and it was taking a really long time, so after about 1/4 of the way around, we switched and used a tool called a ROTOZIP.
(3) We took a clear piece of plastic and laid it over the back side of the old stator cover and used a thin drill to mark where all 6 screw holes went. We took that template and laid it over the sheet metal and marked our spots to cut.
(4) We used a drill (we didn't have a drill press or we would have used that) to cut the screw holes.
(5) In one picture, it says 6x15mm machine screws to hold the stator in place. One picture says 6x30. We settled with 6x50mm screws and ended up cutting them down a few mm's.
(6) We sealed it all up and fired up the bike. It all seemed to work great, and then...oil leak from the bottom of the cover.
(7) We also had a hella of a time trying to figure out where to grind down the ribs on the inside of the cover to let the timing wires be free of pressure.
(8) There has been a lot of talk on this forum about the metal shavings. I don't know enough about bikes to say whether or not I'm screwed but I will say that there were a lot of metal shavings.
(9) It's gonna take all day. The whole project (including going to 4 hardware stores to find 3 screws) took about 8.5 hours, and it wasn't just cause i'm a rookie. I had a metal worker helping me and it still took us all day. I have the sunburn to prove it.
(10) I found that extra stator cover on ebay for fairly cheap and it was a real help to see the back side of what we were doing.
(11) You really have to get the placement of the screw holes exact. There is no buffer with that stator. It will rub the rotor if you are a fraction off.
(12) I'd get some help. Don't do it alone. We had 3 guys all clunking our heads together and we all came up with good ideas throughout the day. I never could have done this on my own.
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(1) Those parts are thin cast aluminum and really don't hold up well to an impact screwdriver, but I don't see what choice you had.
(2) Yes, the cut on the inner case takes a long time (about 30-45 minutes for me and 3 cutting wheels). The wheels make a fine powder and a thin cut, the ROTOZIP makes shavings and a wide cut (not good). Put the bike on the center stand in the shade, get a comfy stool and a cup of coffee, take your time.
(3) The inner case on both sides is ribbed and slightly curved. Clay on the steel plate pressed against the case gives you the exact screw locations, a template might not.
(4) Everybody knows somebody with a drill press (your friend is a metal worker).
(5) Total "thickness" of my stator + inner case + 16 gauge steel plate was 40mm. I used a 25mm on the stator side, and a 15mm screw on the steel plate side (Home Depot, in stock). The spacer is threaded and holds both screws in the middle. Using one long screw and a nut would be 40mm + the nut if you use 16 gauge.
(6) The OEM gasket is no longer thick enough because the gap between the outer cover and inner case is now the thickness of the plate that you made. I used high temp silicon and followed the instructions on the package (which includes clean surfaces and curing time). No leaks.
(7) The picture shows where to grind the outer cover ribs.
(8) Using a ROTOZIP produces shavings (not good).
(9) 8.5 hrs ? Cut 2 circles with a power tool. Drill 6 holes. Assemble. Maybe 8.5 hrs if you include the curing time for the silicon gasket.
(10) The back side(saved $50.):

(11) The placement of the screw holes has to be exact.
(12) Better for one guy to take his time and use the right tools.
 

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wow. kinda rude response. i'll just say two things.

first, i'm somewhat new to bikes. so i was super excited to see your post and idea. the pictures were a huge help. i am very grateful for all the hard work you put in cause i never would have done it without it.

second, just because i did it a little different doesn't really make me wrong. i'm not a pro metal worker or mechanic. i've only been working on bikes for a year or so. but the thing is, i got the job done. this project is not an exact science. for instance - not having a drill press wasn't the end of the world. i just wanna say that a newbie like me was able to get it done and i'd encourage anyone else to give it a shot.

and i think maybe you should take a couple of deep breaths, have a beer, sit back and be proud of what you put together her. jeez.
 

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Discussion Starter #46 (Edited)
wow. kinda rude response. i'll just say two things.

first, i'm somewhat new to bikes. so i was super excited to see your post and idea. the pictures were a huge help. i am very grateful for all the hard work you put in cause i never would have done it without it.

second, just because i did it a little different doesn't really make me wrong. i'm not a pro metal worker or mechanic. i've only been working on bikes for a year or so. but the thing is, i got the job done. this project is not an exact science. for instance - not having a drill press wasn't the end of the world. i just wanna say that a newbie like me was able to get it done and i'd encourage anyone else to give it a shot.

and i think maybe you should take a couple of deep breaths, have a beer, sit back and be proud of what you put together her. jeez.
sorry, brother. don't see anything rude in my post. went over my points and don't see anything but analysis.

sounds like we have about the same experience in riding and mechanics. started riding last summer(46yo). had a dremel for woodworking and borrowed my neighbor's drill press.

a difference of opinion would be " I don't like seafood". an engine full of aluminum shavings with a rubbing rotor and leaking oil is different.

p.s. only small case print so you know that I'm calm.
 

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this is a great mod!.. now if we can get a video of it!
Oh and yes.. our differance's and opinons are what makes this site great... if there were perfict ways of doing everything on this bike then all we would need is the verses!
 

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I just did this last weekend. Didn't take that long and I have access to a mill at work so I could modify the cover beforehand. Used .070" metal we had at work and shaved the mounting bosses down on the inside to reuse the gasket. Fired up on first try and took it for a test run. Small puddle from the bottom of the cover:doh:. Removed cover, cleaned, used more sillycone and no more leak. However, now it wouldn't hold an idle and I had to use the throttle to get it to start. Crap- seemed like a lack of fuel and I was considering messing with the carbs, which I have never done. Tonight I started inspecting and fired it up again. Still didn't sound right. Removed spark plug wire from front and it almost died. Removed one from the rear and no effect. Checked rear plugs, no spark and wet.

Ignitor measures ok, but the pickup coil shows no resistance on the rear. Front measures normal. I'll check the leads on the outside before ripping it open again. Resealing the cover is much easier than an engine tilt (I helped a friend do his). I would recommend this to anyone with some mechanical ability, patience, and fridge full of beer for after:beerchug:. Yea cutting with a dremel cutoff is dirty and messy. Wear safety glasses and mask and fill holes with rags as mentioned. Shop vac cleaned up most dust. Hoping the filter does its job on the rest. I am not too concerned.

Clay was great, although I think I used the kids playdoh. I did have to open up a few holes with a file. I checked clearance by sticking shims on 3 places outside the stator and fitting inside the rotor. If holes were off the stator would not have fit in due to the spacers.

I am curious to see if I damaged the pickup coil wires or if it went bad along with the stator and rectifier. It will be nice once this is all done. My friends replacement took several months so I can't complain.
 

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Discussion Starter #49 (Edited)
Thank you, brother. Play-doh works great. I used the cheap generic clay from Wal-Mart (same stuff).
A few guys have shaved the mounting bosses so that they could use an OEM gasket instead of making one. The only concern is that this reduces the space between the outer cover and the steel plate and might pinch the pickup wires.
If that's what's happening to yours, you could put some washers on the outer cover screws (spacers) and load the gasket up with silicon.

Also check the lower pickup wire on the left side where it passes the plate you made and goes to the pickup.
Mine was pretty tight so I cut a small recess into the plate so that the plate wouldn't cut (and ground) the pickup wire.

 

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I took off the cover today to troubleshoot and the first thing I discovered was one wire on the rear pickup coil had broken off at the base. Glad to find the problem, but not a real easy fix. I guess I wasn't too gentle with it while doing the mod.

I am not the best solderer, but I manged to get it fixed. Now its put back together for 3rd time and hopefully tomorrow will be a good day.
 

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You didn't scallop the metal plate where those wires attach like the original modder did. Is that metal dust all over the stator?
 

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You didn't scallop the metal plate where those wires attach like the original modder did. Is that metal dust all over the stator?
I would definately trim that steel plate back to prevent rubbing on the ignition pick-up wire.

(And blow the aluminum dust off the stator with compressed air - if the engine oil hasn`t already washed it off.:()

Nice soldering job though.:smiley_th
That is another skill I need to develop.
 

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Discussion Starter #53 (Edited)
I'm sure that the pic with the metal dust is the discarded stator, not the final assembly.

First pics I've seen of someone else's stator mod. VERY COOL! THANKS!
 

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I think I may try this mod next time my stator goes (hopefully not for a long time). Looks like a good alternative to the old 'lift and tilt'......
 

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I guess the 3rd time was a charm. She fired right up with no problems with the choke. Took her for a short ride after warming up and no leaks! Back in saddle again. Now I need to get a new rear tire.

Yea the stator from the picture was the old one. I used dremel with a cutoff, so dust was going to get inside the rotor and stator no matter what. I used both hands to hold it steady so a shop vac was not used until afterwards. Having one on during the cutting would have helped.

I used a fine wheel grinder on all the sheet metal edges, so there are no burrs or sharp edges. Yea I should have cut more away for the wires just to be safe.

The soldering was tough because the wires were inside the pickup coil plastic. Just enough visible to clean out and tin with solder paste. Then tinned the wires and put together with the solder covered tip.

Thanks for publishing this idea for everyone. The pictures and description were great. I was too anxious to get it done and should have been more careful.
Ride safe
 

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Discussion Starter #56 (Edited)
Thanks again for the great write up and pics. Glad it worked out for you. When you've recovered from this, try fergy's spline lube. I think he saved my bacon. I'm in the middle of it. Very straight foward process. My front ones by the u joint were dry as a bone and rusting but still meaty.
 

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WOW !!!! i hadnt even considered cutting the housing. Im a metal worker by trade and my stator just went on the fritz !! GOOD JOB !!! im gunna try it this week ill post to let every 1 know how it goes :D
 

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Well after a month still running strong with solid green on the meter and no leaks! I changed the oil after several hundred miles since I wanted to get all the oil through the filter for many cycles - plus I am lazy as you would have learned by reading my past posts and seeing my pictures.

Only a few small burrs on the oil filter screen from the cutting. There was more pieces of silicone than metal. Being curious I cut open and disected the filter. Not too bad. No large pieces of metal. The oil that dripped out was metallic looking towards the end. Much cleaner than I expected, especially for not using a vacuum during cutting.
 

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Ok, I hate to be the one that says this but, Why? Why do all this work to save an hour? When I first got my VN I really thought I needed a new stator and found this thread. Then I looked into it more and it really doesn't take much to pull the engine half way out to do it right.. The main thing I don't trust about this mod is that you need to grind the case down just for a few wires. It seems like over time it may bring you more problems then it's worth.

just my .02
 

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One reason I can think of is you'd never have to pull/tilt the engine if you ever needed to replace the stator. But I haven't done either yet.
 
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