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Cruisin' through my 50's
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, I ran out of daylight today but while my 2003 750 was up on it's center stand I spun the back wheel counter clockwise with my hand and heard a screech for about 20% of a rotation, the other 80% was quiet.

You can see a video here: Rear wheel video

Previous owner had said the dealer looked at rear spline during tire change but who knows. So spline noise? Lack of final drive oil noise? Just dirt in the joints noise?

Anyone want to venture an educated guess? I'm going to check more when I have time and daylight.

Bikes got 19,500 on it and about 7,000 are mine. The rear spline lube is on my list of things to do but I'm pretty green with the wrench so it intimidates me.
 

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Take your tire off and check the brake shoes. It sounds like they need to be cleaned. Also check the gear oil in the final drive using the large nut/plug/fill hole and if it is about to the threads that should be ok. If it is black or really thin you should change the gear oil. Sounds more like brakes. If there is a lot of brake dust in there use carb cleaner to clean the rim and a wire brush to clean the pads. Also it the guage on the brake lever is over half way down the wear guide you will need to replace the brake shoes.

This would be the best time to do the spline lube also where you will have the tire off and over halfway there.
 

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X2 on brakes ,mine was full of dust and needed cleaned out when I changed tires and lubed the splines. Also make sure the lever arm is free and not binding up where it goes thru the brake plate ,mine was and had to be cleaned and lubed no more noise and I also took some steell wool and scuffed the brake shoes and drum to get the glaze off of them ,much better rear brakes now.
 

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Thanks for mentioning the lever arm denny. I forgot to mention to check and see if that was binding and burning up the brakes.

My 93' did that and all that is needed to do there is take it apart (the brake lever off the drum) and clean it up on a bench grinder with a wire wheel and some neversieze if that is a problem. Just make sure you get the spring in the right position when replacing it.
 

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Thanks for mentioning the lever arm denny. I forgot to mention to check and see if that was binding and burning up the brakes.

My 93' did that and all that is needed to do there is take it apart (the brake lever off the drum) and clean it up on a bench grinder with a wire wheel and some neversieze if that is a problem. Just make sure you get the spring in the right position when replacing it.
I had a good buddy that died a couple of years ago that called Never Seize --Anti -Gall ,and grease of any type was salve,every time I her some one mention never seize I have a little chuckle .Ed was one of a kind.
 

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Cruisin' through my 50's
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I had a few minutes today to take another look at the bike. I hadn't thought about the brakes last night. You hear so many horror stories about splines and such that my mind just thought about that. I put it up on it's center stand (my gosh, I must be doing this wrong. It requires two people to get it up on the center stand. When I do it by myself I come uncomfortably close to tipping the bike.)

I spun the rear wheel and..... no sound. Yesterday when it looked like rain was coming I was in a hurry to get the bike down off it's stand and into the garage. I may have let the bike down a little harder than I normally do. I wonder if that could have dislodged whatever was making the sound. If this happens again I'm going to try tapping the lever arm to see if it's seized. It might be that I jarred it loose when I let the bike down.

The rear brake wear gauge shows it well inside the usable limits. I wasn't able to look at the final drive oil because I don't own a metric wrench large enough to handle that large nut and didn't want to strip it with an adjustable (Fathers day is coming... I need to drop a hint or better yet, I'll just go buy one for myself this weekend)

Video of a quiet wheel and brake guage You may hear some bird chirps in the background but the wheel was quiet.

Thanks for the help.
 

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I would still take the wheel off and check the brakes. That sound sounded more like metal on metal and if you groove the drum inside your looking at a new rim. You can't have those turned like a rotor or drum brake. Better to be safe then sorry. The brake wear gauge may say half way but I'm not one to trust anything except my eyes. Never know there could be something in there or it could be just brake dust and if you clean that out the brake will actually work better with a good cleaning. Anybody know if there is a posability of gear oil getting in the brake drum? That would be a bad thing also, glaze over your brakes and when you need them to stop real quick in an emergency and the brakes aren't there.
 

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I bought my 27mm socket at Lowe's. It does sound like maybe the brake screeching, but it's really hard to figure out by a video. It did look to me like the wheel tried to stop spinning when the squeak was there too, making me think the brakes were hung a little.
The spline lube job is intimidating for the first time. We can all agree to that. But once you get in there, you'll realize its not so bad. If you can get someone to help you go through it, it makes all the difference in the world.

The centerstand can be tricky. It really is more of a trick than a sheer strength experience. Leave the side stand down and stand the bike upright with the front wheel straight as you can. Hold the left grip with your left hand and put your foot down on the centerstand lever. When it is square with the floor, the bike will tend to stand upright on its own. It's better to have hard shoes on for this. Put your right hand under the back edge of the frame and get a good grip. All in one motion, put your weight down on the centerstand lever with your right foot, and use your right hand to pull up and guide the bike onto the centerstand feet. If you do this right, the bike will pop up onto the centerstand with just a slight effort. No need to pull with your left hand as its just there to stabilize the bike. Hope this helps.
 

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I bought my 27mm socket at Lowe's. It does sound like maybe the brake screeching, but it's really hard to figure out by a video. It did look to me like the wheel tried to stop spinning when the squeak was there too, making me think the brakes were hung a little.
The spline lube job is intimidating for the first time. We can all agree to that. But once you get in there, you'll realize its not so bad. If you can get someone to help you go through it, it makes all the difference in the world.

The centerstand can be tricky. It really is more of a trick than a sheer strength experience. Leave the side stand down and stand the bike upright with the front wheel straight as you can. Hold the left grip with your left hand and put your foot down on the centerstand lever. When it is square with the floor, the bike will tend to stand upright on its own. It's better to have hard shoes on for this. Put your right hand under the back edge of the frame and get a good grip. All in one motion, put your weight down on the centerstand lever with your right foot, and use your right hand to pull up and guide the bike onto the centerstand feet. If you do this right, the bike will pop up onto the centerstand with just a slight effort. No need to pull with your left hand as its just there to stabilize the bike. Hope this helps.
AS long as I have had my bike I just figured this maneuver out about a month ago and it is by far the easiest way yet.Trust Fergy on this one for sure.
 

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Cruisin' through my 50's
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Discussion Starter #11
When you "lube" the brake lever going into the hub, what do you use? I've got some anti-seize that I used when I installed the new spark plugs, maybe a couple dabs of that? I'm a little shy about putting a lubricant near brakes.

Fergy.... yes, the wheel did slow down as it made the sound. I'll have to practice your technique of getting the bike on the stand. I'll wait till my buddy is around so he can help if the bike starts to go over. I'm left handed and it's natural for me to pull harder with my left arm which dosen't help. I do tend to try to muscle it up on the stand.
 

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When you "lube" the brake lever going into the hub, what do you use? I've got some anti-seize that I used when I installed the new spark plugs, maybe a couple dabs of that? I'm a little shy about putting a lubricant near brakes.

Fergy.... yes, the wheel did slow down as it made the sound. I'll have to practice your technique of getting the bike on the stand. I'll wait till my buddy is around so he can help if the bike starts to go over. I'm left handed and it's natural for me to pull harder with my left arm which dosen't help. I do tend to try to muscle it up on the stand.
Anti-seize is great for that purpose and it's like Brylcreem a little dab will do
 
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