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Discussion Starter #1
The verses only show the front tire removal procedure... is there anything on here about removing the rear tire? I tried the search, but that never seems to give me good results... looked at wheels, suspension and stuff forum and didn't find it. Anyone got a link if it's already on here, or can anyone give me a rundown on how to do it?

One of the main doubts I have is if I need to remove the exhaust on either or both sides.
 

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Old Truck Junkie
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If the exhaust gets in the way the best thing to do is remove the shocks at the lower end. Than you can raise or lower the swing arm as needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, that's what I did with the shocks... the wheel is just about to come off, but this damn 14mm nut won't come off... I suppose it's from the swing arm... not sure, I'm not so experienced with the bike's parts. But it also attaches to the center under the bike, so I'm gonna try to take off that nut and take the whole thing out... it's just so much heat outside and I have no damn shade, so I need a hydrating break right now.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I got the wheel off and I got the old tire out and the newer one patched and put on the rim :) I'll attempt to put the wheel back on later when the sun's a bit more forgiving.

Also, I thought my brakes were gonna be extremely worn out cause I don't have much braking power, but the rear brake shoes don't seem extremely worn (about half, I'd say). Someone said there's a part there that might need lubing for the break to act properly... I'll try to find it, or if someone knows which part it is, please let me know.
 

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knees in the breeze!!!
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roll the wheel in neutral and tighten the nut on the brake rod a few roll some more you want to hear them drag just a bit then back off 1 full turn
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, that's kinda what I've been doing, but the bike has real low brake power... guess I do need new/better brake pads.

Anyway, I got the tire on just fine, everything went well... except the bike won't start, there was a puff of smoke coming from under the seat and I took the seat off and found that a wire got really hot and melted the insulation on it and the electrical tape around the bunch of wires... fortunately, as far as I can see, the other wires are still intact.

However, I still gotta look under the tank and see what the wires look like over there.

I guess tomorrow's gonna be wiring hell Sunday :-/
 

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Old Truck Junkie
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Be sure to check your grounds. Ussually this will happen when the big ground cable is loose and all the current tries to ground through a small ground wire.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Well, I got the wheel off and I got the old tire out and the newer one patched and put on the rim :) I'll attempt to put the wheel back on later when the sun's a bit more forgiving.

Also, I thought my brakes were gonna be extremely worn out cause I don't have much braking power, but the rear brake shoes don't seem extremely worn (about half, I'd say). Someone said there's a part there that might need lubing for the break to act properly... I'll try to find it, or if someone knows which part it is, please let me know.
Ok Ceal, this is a two part Q&A. You say you don`t have much braking power.
Is the angle between the actuating brake rod and the hub brake lever between 80*-90* or less when the brake pedal is applied?
If the angle is greater than 90* you will lose mechanical advantage and braking efficiency.

Part two.
Were the brake shoes or the drum glazed?
Was there a lot of brake dust inside the hub? Did you clean it out?
Does the hub brake lever turn the camshaft freely, and does the spring return it all the way?

The cam shaft needs to be lubricated on the bearing surface where it enters the hub and on the cams where they touch the brake shoes. Also put a dab of grease on the pivot point at the top of the brake shoes. Use the grease sparingly as you don`t want to get any on the braking surface of the shoes or the drum.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok Ceal, this is a two part Q&A. You say you don`t have much braking power.
Is the angle between the actuating brake rod and the hub brake lever between 80*-90* or less when the brake pedal is applied?
If the angle is greater than 90* you will lose mechanical advantage and braking efficiency.

Part two.
Were the brake shoes or the drum glazed?
Was there a lot of brake dust inside the hub? Did you clean it out?
Does the hub brake lever turn the camshaft freely, and does the spring return it all the way?

The cam shaft needs to be lubricated on the bearing surface where it enters the hub and on the cams where they touch the brake shoes. Also put a dab of grease on the pivot point at the top of the brake shoes. Use the grease sparingly as you don`t want to get any on the braking surface of the shoes or the drum.
Not sure about the angle, since the lever on the drum is curved... looks like it might be a little over the 90° mark, so I could work on that.

The brake shoes did look glazed.

There was a lot of brake dust inside, I did clean it out.

I checked the movement and it was ok. I sprayed some WD-40 on the camshaft, trying not to get it onto the brake shoes and I turned the lever by hand a bunch of times and it did feel a bit smoother. However, it didn't feel like it would have been a problem at first anyway.

When I said the brake shoes had been worn to maybe half, I didn't notice that the wear was not uniform. They are much thinner at the middle of the shoes than at the sides, so I guess they are about done.

I think I just need new ones, since they are quite worn in the middle and glazed all over. I don't think that's gonna be too tough to fix... thanks for pointing out the angle, I didn't pay much attention to it yesterday.

What's really got me worried right now is the melted wire :( I hate electric problems...
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Not sure about the angle, since the lever on the drum is curved... looks like it might be a little over the 90° mark, so I could work on that.

The brake shoes did look glazed.

There was a lot of brake dust inside, I did clean it out.

I checked the movement and it was ok. I sprayed some WD-40 on the camshaft, trying not to get it onto the brake shoes and I turned the lever by hand a bunch of times and it did feel a bit smoother. However, it didn't feel like it would have been a problem at first anyway.

When I said the brake shoes had been worn to maybe half, I didn't notice that the wear was not uniform. They are much thinner at the middle of the shoes than at the sides, so I guess they are about done.

I think I just need new ones, since they are quite worn in the middle and glazed all over. I don't think that's gonna be too tough to fix... thanks for pointing out the angle, I didn't pay much attention to it yesterday.

What's really got me worried right now is the melted wire :( I hate electric problems...
Judging from brake shoes I have changed on my autos in the past, it is normal for the middle of the shoe to wear faster than the ends.

IMHO WD40 is more of a cleaner and mild penetrating oil than a lubricant.
When you change the brake shoes pull the brake cam out and clean all the brake components well.
Lube the brake cam bearing surface sparingly with Moly60 or some high temp grease.
If you haven`t checked and lubed the input and output splines on the final drive yet, ( a la fergy`s spline lube and wibs addendum for the hub splines)this is the time to do that too.

To check the 80-90* brake lever angle, visualise a line drawn through the center of the holes/shaft on both ends of the curved brake lever, and use it to compare to the angle with the brake rod.:smiley_th

If the lever needs to be moved, rotating it back one spline on the shaft will be enough. If the brake cam shaft and the gear shifter shaft have the same number of splines (32 I think), a rotation of one spline is 11.25*.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
you're just full of super useful data Gordon!! Thanks! I'm planning on getting the brake shoes and some moly 60 to do the spline lube too. Thanks for the reminder though.

I'm looking at the wiring right now... I think I'll make another thread for it if I can't get it to work right.

The car's brakes went out today for no apparent reason as well, so I need to get this bike running!
 

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Old Truck Junkie
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If you are going to reuse the shoes, sand them up with rough sand paper. Also it is a good idea to do the same with the drum surface.
 
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