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Simple Solutions
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was gonna go for a ride today and it died pullin into the gas station.cran acrank crank flooded the poor beast...... after about 30 min i got her to fire and she ran like $h!t i pulled the rear plug wires and she didnt change rear cylinder is down... limped her home and she died in the drive way... pulled the plugs black pulled the tank pulled the blew the hoses out with compressed air... took the boots off the carb and anywhere i could put the air nozzle i sprayed carb cleaner and compressed air thorough out.. .

Yesterday i tried to swap back to the original tank but found it was still leaking so i put the one i took off back on,

Was thinking that the whole problem was a pinched line but that didnt make sence the flooding or what not im so lost at what happend really am stumped put it back together and she seems to be riding ok im chaulkin it up to bad gas (shell)...

I put seafome in the new tank of texaco premium (i usually use chevron premium ) and i can tell the diffrence between brands and grades i dont know why....

After this feasco i changed the oil yes it was well needed but not the worse interval ever probably 600 to a thousand over due (normal 2500-3000) i pulled the spring and screen this time and there was what i thought were metal flakes everywhere but it was to soft and after i dumped the drain pain into a bucket i found what apeared to be a chunk of rubber.... i cant imagin anything rubber (like a thick o-ring) comming out inside, the oil was supper supper runny about the consistency of water (i use 20-50) so it shouldnt have been that thin i added 2 quarts about a month back and the windo apeared to be smokky but the oil isnt watered down the oil has no oil stain to it its just super thin.... :hitanykey:confused:
 

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The Professor
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3,147 Posts
I was gonna go for a ride today and it died pullin into the gas station.cran acrank crank flooded the poor beast...... after about 30 min i got her to fire and she ran like $h!t i pulled the rear plug wires and she didnt change rear cylinder is down... limped her home and she died in the drive way... pulled the plugs black pulled the tank pulled the blew the hoses out with compressed air... took the boots off the carb and anywhere i could put the air nozzle i sprayed carb cleaner and compressed air thorough out.. .

Yesterday i tried to swap back to the original tank but found it was still leaking so i put the one i took off back on,

Was thinking that the whole problem was a pinched line but that didnt make sence the flooding or what not im so lost at what happend really am stumped put it back together and she seems to be riding ok im chaulkin it up to bad gas (shell)...

I put seafome in the new tank of texaco premium (i usually use chevron premium ) and i can tell the diffrence between brands and grades i dont know why....

After this feasco i changed the oil yes it was well needed but not the worse interval ever probably 600 to a thousand over due (normal 2500-3000) i pulled the spring and screen this time and there was what i thought were metal flakes everywhere but it was to soft and after i dumped the drain pain into a bucket i found what apeared to be a chunk of rubber.... i cant imagin anything rubber (like a thick o-ring) comming out inside, the oil was supper supper runny about the consistency of water (i use 20-50) so it shouldnt have been that thin i added 2 quarts about a month back and the windo apeared to be smokky but the oil isnt watered down the oil has no oil stain to it its just super thin.... :hitanykey:confused:
Your oil is thinned down due to the raw fuel being dumped in the non firing cylinder. The ring will only expand when combustion takes place, if there is no ignition to create combustion the raw fuel slides past the rings on the compression stroke. Due to the inefeciancy of the gasoline powerd internal combustion engine you have to change oil at regular intervals, because all of the fuel is not burned and it contaminates the oil.

A top fuel dragster uses SAE70 oil, in less than 6 seconds it is reduced to a water like consistancy. Using propane (LPG) as a fuel you can go up to 40,000 miles on an oil change.


The rubber chuncks you are getting could be what is left of you balancer dampers. Are you shure it is rubber and not cork from your clutch plates?
 

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Simple Solutions
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965 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
not sure its not cork actually now that you mention it that makes a lot of sense

the thin oil i tried to light on fire with a tource and it didnt ignight but its understandable that the fuel would thin it down, ive never seen oil as thin as this stuff and i am usually really good about my oil changes i hate missin them, moneys been tight and i know its just an excuse but i didnt think i was that late like i said maybe 1000 miles over and i know that in cars ive never experianced that and id gone thousands of miles over due in some of the old beaters i used to drive...
thanks for the insight you've made me a lot more comfortable
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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7,960 Posts
Your oil is thinned down due to the raw fuel being dumped in the non firing cylinder. The ring will only expand when combustion takes place, if there is no ignition to create combustion the raw fuel slides past the rings on the compression stroke. Due to the inefeciancy of the gasoline powerd internal combustion engine you have to change oil at regular intervals, because all of the fuel is not burned and it contaminates the oil.

A top fuel dragster uses SAE70 oil, in less than 6 seconds it is reduced to a water like consistancy. Using propane (LPG) as a fuel you can go up to 40,000 miles on an oil change.

The rubber chuncks you are getting could be what is left of you balancer dampers. Are you shure it is rubber and not cork from your clutch plates?
Hey Lance, I`ve been running propane on cars and trucks since 1974 and my father converted a `63 Pontiac in 1966. I suppose you could go 40,000 miles between oil changes, as it doesn`t get black like oil in a gas powered engine does. It does get sort of honey colored and darker as the miles accumulate, as well as a thicker consistency. We usually wouldn`t go much over 10k miles between oil changes, due in part to thicker oil in cold Canadian winters, causing harder starting.

Way back in the good old days of 1974, when gas was about 70 cents/Imperial gallon, I was buying propane for 10 cents/gal. My `66 Grand Pariesenne with a 327 and a 2 speed Hydromatic (Canadian model, largest 4 door hardtop available then, sorry, I don`t know the US equivalent) cost about a cent a mile for fuel. :smiley_th:smiley_th Oh for the good old days!!
 

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Registered
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62 Posts
Seebeeare,
I was gonna ask about your tank also. Did you paint it yourself and is that flat black? Any advice on doing this, as I am considering it myself. Thanks
GUS
 

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Simple Solutions
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Discussion Starter #7
the first attempt at flat black and yes i did itmyself i used an acrylic enamel and i didnt go expencive but the moment the gas hit it poof paint gone 2 days down the drain ... for the lettering i printed a font on masking tape ans cut them out on the tank.... then painted the black over that i did notice the primer staid on after the gas im half tempted to find the right color primer but i know thats permiable and will promote rust i will do atttepmt 2 after i figure out how to seal the tank cross your finger i dont blow up but red hot metal here i come
 

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Premium Member
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I have a very old woman's hair dryer, the kind where they put a ventilated plastic hood over their hair and attached a hose from the fan/heating unit. I got as much gas out as I could, opened the cap, inserted hose, and ran for several hours over the course of a couple of days. No problem welding on the tank. Have also heard of using dry ice (drives out oxygen so no boom), filling tank with water, and running a hose from auto exhaust into the tank before and during welding. Be careful.
 
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