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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, Folks -
If my "wear limit" indicator on the rear brake is suggesting that a "replacement" is imminiently warranted...do I need new rear brake shoes? Pads? A drum? I haven't dismantled my rear set-up to see how the drum brake works (when I lubed the splines I tried not to disturb ancillary parts), but I was wondering if anyone had a quick answer to this question.

Thanks!
 

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Geek
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Check it out soon. You don't want metal from a worn down shoe scraping up the drum in the rear wheel. The drum and rear wheel are one piece.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
rnewell said:
Check it out soon. You don't want metal from a worn down shoe scraping up the drum in the rear wheel. The drum and rear wheel are one piece.
It's on my new project bike, and since I've dismantled most of the rear (well, okay, all of it), it's not even close to rideable at the moment. But I saw a couple of rear brake shoes on eBay and was wondering if that's what I need to replace. Come to think of it, though, what I did see of the rear was a true *drum*, not shoes. Is that right?
 

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The shoes are similar to the front pads. The drum is the inside of the wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here's the eBay item number (190052996642). Sooooo, I need a drum *and* shoes? Or are these the wrong item altogether? I'm at work, and didn't bring my Clymer's with me...Perhaps I should just...work? :)
 

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Cindy disc brakes (like on the front) use brake pads, drums (like on the back) use brake shoes. if the shoes are worn, you could just replace them but keep in mind you should inspect the drum for wear...there are wear limits for the drums and also the discs
 

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Discussion Starter #7
TrashLord said:
Cindy disc brakes (like on the front) use brake pads, drums (like on the back) use brake shoes. if the shoes are worn, you could just replace them but keep in mind you should inspect the drum for wear...there are wear limits for the drums and also the discs
The wear indicator on the outside of the drum (the arrow thing that marks "within limit") - that's for the shoes or the drum?
 

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The shoes. The drum will have to be measured by a set of calipers or similar tool. They measure the thickness of the drum wall.
How many miles does your project bike have on it? The rear brake should be good for a long time as the fronts supply most of the braking power.
 

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Cindy,

here is part of the micro fiche for the rear end. I've marked the shoes so you will know what they look like.
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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The price of a new set of brake shoes is about $30.
Although the ones on ebay (which is what you'd need) don't look too bad, I'd say go with new.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks, guys. I checked out the Bike Bandit schema as well, and decided that's what's on eBay. Put in a small bid, but imagine that'll get wiped out when it gets closer to D-Day (or E Day). $30 new is do-able.

The bike's got 25K, so there could be some wear. Definitely the indicator is suggesting that I should replace the shoes (!aha!), but the rear brake cable is also about maxed out. I was going to check out the rear splines this evening (not much left on that back end of the bike now - seat, fender, exhaust pipes and mufflers, passenger foot pegs have all been removed either for cleaning or tossing), so it's just good to know what I'm looking at/for once I pull off the rear wheel with the Moly 60 in hand.

I have this sneaking suspicion that tearing a bike apart is whole lot more fun than putting it back together... am I in for a big surprise a few weeks from now??
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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Just take your time re-assembling, all the while remembering that once the bike is back together you'll have much more of an understanding of what's what with all those nuts & bolts YOU wrenched on.

Yes, it is more fun taking it apart, but once things are up and running again, the putting back together part ends up being fun after the fact. (with maybe a few ƒ*¤¢®'s and §µ¿£'s thrown in for inspiration, LOL)

You've got the support of this great group here Cindy. Don't start doubting things now !!
 

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Cindy putting it all back together can be just as easy as the tear down...one way to keep it easy is (asuming you have space) keep everything laid out in order of disassembly and just work backwards when reassembling.
if you can...post a pic of your shoes...from the side so we can see the wear on them, hey might as well showthe drum while your at it...to at least show if the are scored up badly...you would still need to have them messured tho
 

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The wear indicater lets know that your brake shoes are near the end of there ability to stop you properly.And since you are tearing the bike all apart you should just replace the brake shoes.Yes drum brakes....................
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The beautiful thing about having a digital camera is that I can take pics as I'm disassembling; then, even though I keep things in the same order I took them off the bike (even putting tape on washers if they're running around loose), when in doubt, there's photographic evidence to serve as a double-check (plus those schematics from Bike Bandit really help!).

I didn't get around to doing any more work this evening, but am taking a day off tomorrow just to play. I'll take pics of the shoes and the drum - and for measuring the drum thickiness, my vernier calipers will do the trick? Or must I purchase another new tool? :rockon:
 

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The verniers will work just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Okay, I pulled off the rear wheel and checked out the brake situation in there. It didn't look too good - lots of red dust. I had a sudden flashback to a trip I took to Sedona. Who knew earthtones and motorcycles went together? Anyway, I cleaned up the pads and the drum with CRC brake parts cleaner, and things began to look a little better. The pads appear to be "ok" - they're not down past the wear mark on the pads themselves, but clearly the rose-colored dust did not just "appear" in there. The drum housing thing - the part that holds the pads - seems warped, however. It's not sitting firmly against the wheel, and that should no doubt be replaced.

I'm still trying to post pics - something funny was happening when I tried to upload to a new album. Any thoughts about potential causes for the dust situation? I wore a full respirator, goggles, etc. because of the CRC product, but it'd be nice to not have to repeat that cleaning process.

Oh, also lubed the rear splines while i was back there. Lo and behold, there was more than a trace of Moly 60 on 'em! So the brakes may be shot, but the splines were lookin' good! :pepper:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Measurements

Got back to the rear wheel again last evening so that I could measure the drum diameter and see if that's what might be causing the section with the brake pads to sit a little loose. Here's the dilemma: Clymer's shows someone measuring the ID of the wheel well at the very top of the well. When I did that, I got a measure of 184mm (3.25mm beyond the acceptable limit). But the pads sit further down in the well, and there's a step-off there that has a smaller ID (180mm, which is within .75mm of tolerances). Anybody know which is the correct measurement? It couldn't be that Clymer's is wrong, could it? :D
 

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You want to take the measurement of where the shoes sit. That is where the most wear is. The step-off has no wear so don't use it.
 
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