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Wareagle1970
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Discussion Starter #1

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Premium Member
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That should do it. Tying down the free end of the strap will help keep it from fraying.
 

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Wareagle1970
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409 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Only thing that bothered me is it doesn't list the strap strength. Also, am trying to figure where to tie it down to my 1970 F100 pickup, that I will be hauling my bike in...
 

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Super Moderator
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I got a simular set at Wal-Mart for around the same price, but one end had web loops to go around your handlebars ... You don't want to use the hooks.

They do sell "soft straps" seperately, but if you look you should be able to find the set with them built in.

Four straps should be able to hold down a fairly large bike, does not make much sence to know how many pounds they handle when you really have no idea about how much force they need to cover anyway... If they say they are for motorcycles or ATV's you should be fiine as long as you are not off roading your trailer at 70 mph.

Do not cover the bike, and do as flite suggested and tape down the loose ends....not only so they do not fray, but ,mostly so they do not beat the paint right off your bike.


They do make tie down hooks you can bolt to truck beds, I would suggest getting some.

Make sure you do not crank the front forks all the way down... leave a bit of fork travel so the bike can absorb shocks. The top of the rear shock mount is the best place for the rear straps.


KM
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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6,141 Posts
I've hauled dirtbikes a lot more than the Vulcan, but same principle.
I found it best, when hauling in a pick-up, to have the bikes front wheel in one front corner of the bed, and the rear at the opposite rear corner.
That keeps the front tire from possibly sliding out to one side or the other if it's in the middle and there's no wheel chock.

When tying it down, if the front tire is in the front passenger corner, run the left strap to the front drivers side of the bed and then the right strap to the middle or rear or the passenger side of the bed.
With the front straps as wide as possible, where they attach to the bed, you need very little downward pressure to hold the bike very secure.
One strap on the left rear of the bike to the middle or front drivers side of the bed will hold the rear of the bike fine.

I wouldn't use those bed tiedowns that mount in the stake pockets of a bed. Too much of a chance of them pulling out.

DON'T put the kickstand down once you are underway!!
After the first 20-40 miles or so, stop and check that the straps are still holding securely.
 

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gun slinger
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1,110 Posts
i ran my tire up the the front of the bed then took a tie down from each fork and load the front suspension a little (forward), then i ran one through the rear wheel and ratched it tight (towards the bed) , i then shook the crap out of the bike and if it didnt move i rolled on down the hwy














i bought a 6 pack of ratchet straps from home depot for like $9.00

i have used them for moveing 15 different bikes and a bunch of other stuff i wouldnt want to fall off on the hwy
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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7,960 Posts
I have never trucked a bike, but just recently read a suggestion for making an inexpensive front wheel chock for a pick-up truck. Cut a piece of plywood to fit the width across the front of the box and screw a couple of pieces of 2"X4" vertically to it to center the front tire between.

When you do put some tie down points on the bed of the truck, make sure they are anchored solidly with bolts to the frame, or to large reinforcment plates under the sheet metal floor. Just using flat washers under there would be asking for trouble.
 

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Wareagle1970
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Discussion Starter #8
pack of 6 ratchet straps for $9? You happen to know their strength?
 

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gun slinger
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1,110 Posts
pack of 6 ratchet straps for $9? You happen to know their strength?
There 12' 440 lbs working load and 1320lbs break capacity and it a 4 pack
 

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Daily rider
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1,043 Posts
I have never trucked a bike, but just recently read a suggestion for making an inexpensive front wheel chock for a pick-up truck. Cut a piece of plywood to fit the width across the front of the box and screw a couple of pieces of 2"X4" vertically to it to center the front tire between.

When you do put some tie down points on the bed of the truck, make sure they are anchored solidly with bolts to the frame, or to large reinforcment plates under the sheet metal floor. Just using flat washers under there would be asking for trouble.
The first time I hauled my VN750 was a couple of years ago when I bought my used Chevy S-10. I rode the bike to the dealership, and after making the deal on the pickup, asked for help loading the bike into the bed. All I had to tie it down was a container of bungee cords. Hauled the bike about 80 miles home. It didn't move a lick. Hooked the bungees to the tie-down hooks that came factory in the box. They're just below the top of the box in each corner.
 

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IBEW 915 Electrician
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115 Posts
Picked up a VN750, put it in the back of my Ranger and used the tie-downs that came with the truck, two up at the front of the bed and two at the rear. The straps had rubber coated hooks. The bike was centered on the bed of truck with the front tire against front of the bed and the bike resting on the side stand. The hooks were attached to the handle bars close to the bar clamps and tied to the front tie-downs. The rear tire was secured between the two rear tie-downs. The straps were ratcheted securely and I had no problems on the 1200 mile trip to the house. There were steep hills and bumpy roads. The hooks did not mar the handle bars.

I did worry about the strength of the tie-downs. They are bolted to the side of the bed. But after the trip I noticed no signs of stress on the tie downs. At no point in the 1200 miles did I have to tighten the straps after the initial tightening at the beginning of the trip.

If there was a problem I thought it would come from the bike weight being to far back over the rear axle. The springs did look a little flat. But once the bike was unloaded things got back to normal.
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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Been a while since I used mine, but I did something that eliminated the soft chords to wrap around for protection, darn CRS, I may have cut the hooks off one end and looped that around the upper fork section, can't remember for sure but look at yours, that might work...
I always just centered my bike, put it on the side stand, and installed the left side strap just near snug then went to the right side and strapped it till I was verticle or about 1/2 fork compression, put the side stand up, 1/2 arse did the rear, and away...lol...
BTW-My Silverado ext cab has factory tie downs in all 4 corners... I load and unload with a folding ramp, and the ramp stores folded flat beside the bike in the bed...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
 
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