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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Questions for SEASONED RIDERS

Hi all,

I've never gone on a continuous ride that has exceeded 3hrs (I know that's pretty bad), so my 1st question is?

My throttle hand fatigues really badly.. so would a Cramp buster be sufficient on a 20 hr plus ride round trip?

Or what are your thoughts on this issue? What should I do?

I currently have a throttle lock installed but I've noticed that after a few mins of it being engaged that my speed starts to decrease and I have to constantly re-engage it which gets very frustrating. I can't keep that up for 20+ hrs round trip. I will be riding through VERY,VERY HILLY Terrain (the Entire state of NEBRASKA & IOWA) I-80.

When riding that far how often should one give the bike a rest? Like is there a such thing as over working the bike/pushing it beyond its limit? This is my biggest fear (killing my bike).

Is there any other tips you guys can offer? Please anything that will be helpful.

Oh, and I will be riding/traveling ALONE.
 

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I don't consider myself a seasoned rider...

But concerning the throttle. The Cramp Buster will help some - allows you to relax your grip and such.

I've used the Omni Cruise on mine ( OMNI-CRUISE: Universal Motorcycle Throttle Lock. Like the throttle lock you mentioned I have to frequently make minor adjustments but it allowed me to move my hand, let go of the throttle, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't consider myself a seasoned rider...

But concerning the throttle. The Cramp Buster will help some - allows you to relax your grip and such.

I've used the Omni Cruise on mine ( OMNI-CRUISE: Universal Motorcycle Throttle Lock. Like the throttle lock you mentioned I have to frequently make minor adjustments but it allowed me to move my hand, let go of the throttle, etc.
Ok, thanks! I will look into the Omni one never heard of that one.>:)
 

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Don't worry about resting the bike more than fuel breaks. It will do fine all day as long as it has fuel and oil. More than likely your body, especially your rear end if you have the stock seat, is going to tell you when it needs to rest. Shifting your weight in the saddle will help.

If your throttle lock has a tensioner, tighten it up. That should eliminate the slowly decreasing speed, at least on the flats. I know it did on mine. Over long distances, you will become both physically and mentally fatigued. Mental fatigue is hard to recognize until you start making mistakes, which can end badly. Stop, rest, sleep. I wouldn't do over 350-450 miles per day at first, even if you think you can go farther. Riding just tires you out quicker than you realize.
 

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ISO grips help, I use the palm rest on mine.

Windshield will reduce fatigue. Highway pegs are nice for leg stretch.

About 128 miles per tank is the range. Stretch your legs on those pitstops.
 

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ISO grips help, I use the palm rest on mine.

Windshield will reduce fatigue. Highway pegs are nice for leg stretch.

About 128 miles per tank is the range. Stretch your legs on those pitstops.

X2 on the windshield. I recently rode at highway speed (first time in a while) for a short bit and was really fighting the wind. Can't imagine doing that for hours.

Can't wait to get my windshield back on.
 

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1986 VN750
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Mental and physical breaks are a must, as many have noted. If you start to feel yourself zoning, while trying to find a rest spot, change your point of visual focus every few seconds. It helps. I use frequent breaks as an opportunity to check out local sights. It's amazing what you miss at 55mph.

Wind protection goes a long way, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Don't worry about resting the bike more than fuel breaks. It will do fine all day as long as it has fuel and oil. More than likely your body, especially your rear end if you have the stock seat, is going to tell you when it needs to rest. Shifting your weight in the saddle will help.

If your throttle lock has a tensioner, tighten it up. That should eliminate the slowly decreasing speed, at least on the flats. I know it did on mine. Over long distances, you will become both physically and mentally fatigued. Mental fatigue is hard to recognize until you start making mistakes, which can end badly. Stop, rest, sleep. I wouldn't do over 350-450 miles per day at first, even if you think you can go farther. Riding just tires you out quicker than you realize.
Ok, thanks soo much for the enlightenment.:motorcycl
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Mental and physical breaks are a must, as many have noted. If you start to feel yourself zoning, while trying to find a rest spot, change your point of visual focus every few seconds. It helps. I use frequent breaks as an opportunity to check out local sights. It's amazing what you miss at 55mph.

Wind protection goes a long way, too.

OK, thanks, will do!:rockon:
 

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Headbanger/Popes of Hell
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Don't worry about resting the bike more than fuel breaks. It will do fine all day as long as it has fuel and oil. More than likely your body, especially your rear end if you have the stock seat, is going to tell you when it needs to rest. Shifting your weight in the saddle will help.

If your throttle lock has a tensioner, tighten it up. That should eliminate the slowly decreasing speed, at least on the flats. I know it did on mine. Over long distances, you will become both physically and mentally fatigued. Mental fatigue is hard to recognize until you start making mistakes, which can end badly. Stop, rest, sleep. I wouldn't do over 350-450 miles per day at first, even if you think you can go farther. Riding just tires you out quicker than you realize.
2x on this^.

350-450 miles a day is what I have always read as to be the rule of thumb, for taking a motorcycle trip.

stay hydrated! as stated, take breaks. lots of them. when we ride and we stop for gas, we hydrate, take a pit stop and always walk around, get a bite or a snack.
 

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If this bike had a 19 gallon gas tank, it could run 5000 rpm all day and not break a sweat. I'm always grateful for gas stops.

2x on hydration, muscle cramps are hell. Myself, I would start hydrating the day before I left. But in my case, probably still wouldn't help. :doh:
 

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NewB to Vulcans
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If you are going alone make sure someone knows roughly where you are where you will be next, i had my Vulcan quit in the middle of a cell dead zone in rural Florida. I carry two cell phones JIC, had one simply die on me on I-10 on a cross country trip. I also have an old Magellan GPS as it works off the grid (like I-10 through Texas).

I have a home made zip tie throttle helper doohickey and a palm thingy, both help esp when zapping along at 80 for long distances. My commute to work is 63 miles with up to 60 on freeways depending on route. I also have a Bluetooth intercom so i can listen to the radio and get voice info from Waze. Consider a gel seat cushion. I have a Mustang seat and find it quite hard compared to stock, its also slightly taller.

I could not do that commute without a shield or fairing, I have an antique Vetter fairing installed currently. An hour plus of wind battering you about the head and shoulders is too much for this old guy.

+++ on taking rest stops, but with the poor range of the Vulcan you pretty much can only get two hours at a time anyway! I don't do more than ~8 hours a day in my Durango on FL to AZ and back cross countries so would probably limit to 6 hours riding the Vulcan and limit that to two days in a row, maybe three.

Have fun, sounds like a nice little challenge.
 

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All of the above^
Although I'll say I'm not a fan of throttle locks. I'm just not a fan of the idea that they allow you to take your hand away from the throttle, and more importantly the front brake lever. A simple cheap crampbuster however was a godsend to me on a long trip.
Many folks I've seen that get cramps in their right hand are getting this from just gripping the throttle too tightly. That's why I prefer tacky rubber grips...I can hold the throttle open by just barely gripping it.(Still leaving a finger or two over the brake lever)

Any long trip your main concern should be your comfort. If you're not comfortable in the saddle it will wear on you. Also there may be areas that will do that, but won't show up until you have gone a few hundred miles. Seats being the biggest culprit here. The first 110 miles were fine, but suddenly your ass starts feeling pain.

I also suggest planning not just your route, but your stops. That 350-450 mile thing may be a stretch for someone that's never gone that far. If I'm doing a 560 mile trip, I won't try and do it in one day, I'll break it down to two 280 mile legs, and I'll already have booked a motel at that halfway point.
Same goes for gas stops. You don't want to find yourself near empty and not be sure you can make it to the next station. Planning helps here. You can always alter things if you want, but having reasonable goals for each day will make you more comfortable and relaxed.
I won't travel at night, so I try and plan my overnight stops so I get there in time to relax, have dinner, and get enough sleep before leaving in the morning.

I'd also suggest getting a dedicated GPS. They not only can be used to plan your route, but give you information on where to eat, where to fill up, and give alternate routes if you find the one you originally mapped out won't work because of accidents or road closures.

Good luck and happy motoring:)
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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yes you don't wanna run outta gas.sleeping underneath a picnic table at a rest stop in Pennsylvania is very underrated.everyone should try it at least once.lol

Sent from my LGL34C using Tapatalk
 

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yes you don't wanna run outta gas.sleeping underneath a picnic table at a rest stop in Pennsylvania is very underrated.everyone should try it at least once.lol

Sent from my LGL34C using Tapatalk
so long as I can CCW in PA, that sounds like a hoot! :carryflag
 

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A lot of good advice, but I'm wondering why your taking on such an extreme ride after only averaging 3 hours at a time. Hopefully you'll be able to take several days to complete it and enjoy yourself as well. Riding hard for hours at a time will take it's toll, as stated above. And riding alone is not a safe bet. These are older bikes and things happen. I wish you good luck and be safe out there.
 
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