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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if the brake rotors on the Vulcan are supposed to be taken to a machine shop like car brake rotors would be... I thought I saw a post where someone said they weren't supposed to be machined, but I couldn't find it, so I had to make another post.

So should they be machined when I change the front brake pads? Also, do they sell new ones anywhere?
 

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Hi Ceal:
I have not heared of anyone machining motorcycle rotors. If they are very scored they can be replaced, but I think they are too thin to machine off enough metal to remove scoring. Unless they are below minimal thickness or deeply scored I don't think there is any harm in just replacing the pads. I have done so in the past without any problems on other bikes.
Bronson
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hmm I think it was you who I saw post it before lol. I can't get the hang of the search option on this forum though, so I couldn't find it again.

So who sells new rotors for our bikes? I don't think mine need to be replaced, but it's always good to know, just in case...

Also, what do you think about sanding the rotors a bit just to remove any rust or glazing there might be? Maybe better to not mess with them at all?
 

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Well, I don't think I have posted on rotors before. Cheap cycle parts may have the rotors for our bikes at better prices that a stealership. Sometimes they can be found on Ebay.
I can't see any advantage to sanding them unless there is a residue or something glazing the metal. I would leave them alone if still in good shape. The enemy of good is better sometimes.
Bronson
 

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I bought a set of OEM rotors from a friend of mine with a parts bike then took them to work and machined them on a lathe at work. They turned out pretty good(certainly not a factory finish though) I am still waiting to install them on the bike. Since they are not designed to be resurfaced I really don't see any shops resurfacing them for anyone due to safety concerns. Since they are drilled they need to be ground down wit a stone of some type in a lathe. I used a carbide cutting tool (you have to use Carbide because these rotors are made of an extremely hardened steel, It will eat up a normal lathe steel cutting tool) And using this cutting technique you will have to go extremely slow and make multiple passes because the cutting bit hits the drilled holes in the rotor and causes a slope on the back side of the hole. So far the cheapest I have found for aftermarket rotors is 320.00. for a set to my front door. If any of you have found them cheaper please tell us where in this thread ...Thank You!:smiley_th
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yea, a link to cheaper rotors would be awesome... $320 is too much for me right now. As far as a shop not resurfacing them because of safety concerns... I live in Mexico!! What safety concerns? lol.

Anyway, I try not to do things like most Mexican mechanics and try to do things right, so that's why I was asking about resurfacing them. I haven't really taken a good look to see if they are glazed, but since it's an 85 and it sat for like a year before the previous owner got it and neglected it, it can't hurt to ask if I can sand them to remove any rust or glazing or whatever I find lol
 

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X2 for Old Hoss. If they are not warped or deeply scored, put those babies back on and ride! Just be sure those initial brake appllications are gentle!
Bronson
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Cool, thanks for the info guys!

I did look at the rotors on ebay, but I was asking to see if they could be found new but not so expensive...
 

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I machined mine on a brake lathe we only use carbide lathe bits. it actually peels the rotor in long strands that are razor sharp. So be careful if you do
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yea, I've used those carbide bits at school... The teacher took this metal rod and did all sorts of random deep scratches on it and told me to make it smooth again lol. Used the carbide bit to cut it and then I sanded it to get it smooth. Those metal strands are definitely sharp and can easily cut you... especially if they get between your fingers or if they jump at your neck or something.
 
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